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A discount-store employee is time-warped to a medieval castle, where he is the foretold savior who can dispel the evil there. Unfortunately, he screws up and releases an army of skeletons. (tvguide.com)
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December 31, 2017

The [New Year's] Weekend Desk Report

For completists, there was no column on Friday.

The best countdown the world will see this year has already happened.

Some background here from LandOfSkyBlueWaters.com.

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The Best Movie I Saw In 2017

Reptilicus, on Mystery Science Theater 3000.

*

Hipster Ed

*

About "Cheap Sunglasses"

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Reminder For 2018

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New on the Beachwood today and since Thursday's post . . .

Chicagoetry: Metal Machine Music
Nothing, really nothing to turn off.

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The Week In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Ulla Straus, die Reihe, Wish Fulfillment, Michael DeMaio, Yakuza, Helen Money, and Common Kings.

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The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #181: Vegas Is Always Right
Whales, hookers, blow and food poisoning. Plus: We Miss The Beef O'Brady Bowl; Our Hypothetical Gambling Habits; Too Early For College Basketball; All About Niko; Don't Tell Me The Cubs Couldn't Afford Wade Davis; and The Bears, Ugh.

With special guest Mike Luce, pinch-hitting for the vacationing Jim "Coach" Coffman.

*

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 6
"One of the few remnants of Red Terror appears ingloriously as the name of the school's gameday bus service."

*

CEO-Worker Income Gap Higher In U.S. Than Anywhere Else In The World: Analysis
Not even close.

*

The Paradise Papers: The Long Twilight Struggle Against Offshore Secrecy
A groundswell of action.

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ChicagoGram

Dear Beautiful Brickhouse...You're Mighty Mighty, Just Lettin' It ALL Hang Out! Thanks to Chicago Artist Amanda Williams @awstudioart I just found my mantra for 2018...I'm A MF Brickhouse! I'm Lettin' It ALL Hang Out...You Can't Blow Me Down! Spent yesterday in the city @mcachicago and while I saw some really cool art throughout the gallery Amanda's exhibit blew me away. Trying to explain it won't do it justice you have to see it for yourself. Let's just say these bricks have a story. If you head in go to @farmhousechicago for Brunch and sit upstairs in the sunshine...food is fresh and amazing! #newyearnewmantra #2018mantra #amandawilliams #museumcontemporaryartchicago #museumcontemporaryart #adayinthecity #chitown #chicago #chicagoartist #farmhousechicago #lesleyarlaskybrandographer #lesleyarlaskyphotography

A post shared by Lesley Arlasky (@lesleyarlasky) on

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ChicagoTube

Music Maker Jam Chicago House Disco House Dance Pop EDM1 Throwback Hip Hop.

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Weekend BeachBook
A sampling.

'America Is A White Nation' In Maggie Daley Park.

Emboldened.

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A Tribute To My Improbable Tea Party Friend.

*

Sorry, Obama's Still Deporter-In-Chief.

*

Who Would Pay $26,000 To Work In A Chicken Plant?

*

The Last 2 McDonald's Selling Pizza Have Been Forced To Stop.

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Weekend TweetWood
A sampling.

*

How The News Media Distorts Black Families.

As it has been ever thus, and yet still not solved. How long?

*

For some reason, they are ennobled in the media mindset - unlike, say, poor black people, who get what they deserve.

*

Part of the problem.

*

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The Weekend Desk Tronc Line: Ennobled.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 11:19 AM | Permalink

Chicagoetry: Metal Machine Music

Metal Machine Music

Ain't it just like the night to play tricks when you're trying to be so quiet? - Bob Dylan, "Visions of Johanna"

The heat pipes do more than just cough:
they hiss and spew, slur and sing.
Sometimes comes garbled dialogue
in a voice like Captain Beefheart

or his hero Howlin' Wolf;
that could be a projection of mind
or perhaps the pipes are actually
channeling radio waves.

A generalized hiss that ebbs, then flows,
noise that soothes rather than sullies.
Highly percussive: clanks, pops, whistles, pings.
At each resurgence, a few more handfuls of rain

transmogrify into both comfort
and joy.

Sometimes it's like air brakes
on a freight train, sometimes like
the old dial-up modem
connection signal,

Old-fashioned radiator heat
throughout a multi-unit building:
automatic, even excessive,
Nothing to turn on and

nothing, really nothing to turn off.
As such, a luxury,
like sleep itself anymore in life
during wartime.

Not until late middle-age
did I not shiver indoors, dressed in layers,
through fifty Chicago winters.
This stolid, clockwork choir

celebrates my coming through!
Instead of irritation
whenever this ambient oratorio
commences I feel

elation.

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J.J. Tindall is the Beachwood's poet-in-residence. He welcomes your comments. Chicagoetry is an exclusive Beachwood collection-in-progress.

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More Tindall:

* Chicagoetry: The Book

* Ready To Rock: The Music

* Kindled Tindall: The Novel

* The Viral Video: The Match Game Dance

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:14 AM | Permalink

December 30, 2017

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Ulla Straus at Heavy Petting on Thursday night.


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2. die Reihe at Heavy Petting on Thursday night.

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3. Wish Fulfillment at Heavy Petting on Thursday night.

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4. Michael DeMaio at Heavy Petting on Thursday night.

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Catching up with . . .

Yakuza at the Empty Bottle on December 22nd.

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Helen Money at the Empty Bottle on December 22nd.

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Common Kings at the Concord on December 9th.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:08 PM | Permalink

December 29, 2017

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #181: Vegas Is Always Right

Whales, hookers, blow and food poisoning. Plus: We Miss The Beef O'Brady Bowl; Our Hypothetical Gambling Habits; Too Early For College Basketball; All About Niko; Don't Tell Me The Cubs Couldn't Afford Wade Davis; and The Bears, Ugh.


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SHOW NOTES

* 181.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report!

3:08: We Miss The Beef O'Brady Bowl.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 6.

* Return On Investment.

* Bowl Game Or Bust: Is Title Sponsorship Worth It?

* And yet, bowls persist.

* Vegas is always right.

* Ohio State (Luce) vs. USC (Rhodes).

* East Coast vs. West Coast.

24:30: Our Hypothetical Gambling Habits.

* NFL vs. NCAA.

* Mike Luce Plays Roulette And I Will Never Let Him Forget It.

* Mike Luce Hits On 16.

* Whales, Hookers & Blow.

* About The Heaven That Is Sportsbooks.

* The Cosmopolitan (By Marriott).

* Monsters Inside Me.

* Top Golf.

53:05: Too Early For College Basketball.

* The usual suspects.

53:23: All About Niko.

* Rhodes: Keep Niko. Luce: Trade Niko.

54:48: Blackhawks Black Box.

* Without Corey Crawford, garbage.

* Q on the hot seat. Really.

56:13: Don't Tell Me The Cubs Couldn't Afford Wade Davis.

* We talk about it!

1:00:29: The Bears, Ugh.

* Luce loves Tarik Cohen, though, and thinks Trubisky might have something. But the rest of the offense is a mess, including Jordan Howard's inability to catch. Oh, and maybe Shaheen.

* Something about chickens and contact lenses.

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STOPPAGE: 7:06

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For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:05 PM | Permalink

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 6

The Demon Deacons, Aggies (times three), Wolfpack, Sun Devils, Wildcats (twice), Trojans, and Buckeyes are in action today.

Sidebar: the Wolfpack are among 13 NCAA Division I football teams with a nickname that does not end in 's.' Quiz yourself on the remaining 11* here.

Sidebar's sidebar: Depending on how you split hairs, only one college team has an individual nickname. The Wolfpack, for instance, does not end in 's' yet refers to a pack of more than one wolf. If you gave up on the quiz above or decided seeing the results wasn't worth handing over your e-mail address, take a look at the list here and decide for yourself.

Sidebar to the sidebar's sidebar: The Editorial Guidelines page provided by North Carolina State puts in plainly: Wolfpack is a singular noun that takes a singular verb and pronoun. Here's a conundrum that has bugged us: what do you call a lone Wolfpack? A one-man wolfpack, if you will. Take the following example of how this question is easily resolved for other teams:

Kentucky's Benny Snell ranks among the nation's top rushers yet garners little attention outside the SEC. The Wildcat running back doesn't appear on many lists of premier players despite posting 18 TDs, good for #5 nationally.

Straight forward, no?

The Belk Bowl
Wake Forest Demon Deacons (-3.5) vs. Texas A&M Aggies
Noon, ESPN (Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, NC)

Hard to have a strong feeling about this one. Wake Forest never makes our radar. Texas A&M plays in the Southeastern Conference and can't get past the likes of Alabama, LSU and Auburn in the SEC West. That the two teams in this year's Belk Bowl have never met previously is the only mildly interesting tidbit we can offer about this game

CFR pick: The Aggies, we guess?

The Chicken: Wake Forest by 31

*

The Hyundai Sun Bowl
#24 NC State Wolfpack (-7) vs. Arizona State Sun Devils
2 p.m. ESPN (Sun Bowl in El Paso, TX)

North Carolina State fields a competent passing attack (#35 overall in passing YPG), led by QB Ryan Finley. The junior Wolfpa . . . Wolfpacker? Wolfpackee? Pack person? Finley can't be a wolf, as the team is a Wolfpack, not the Wolves. What is he? What, we ask you!

This dilemma would be a non-issue had NC State stuck with the "Farmers and Mechanics," the Aggies, the Techs, or the Red Terrors, all historical nicknames of other school sports squads. The latter was held as the nickname for all other sports (other than football, which switched to the Wolfpack early on) from 1925 to 1948. The Red Terrors would be hands-down the sweetest nickname in sports. But no, the student body, blind to the predicament such a decision would present to future commentators, opted to call all university teams "Wolfpack" in 1948. One of the few remnants of Red Terror appears ingloriously as the name of the school's gameday bus service.

CFR pick: We're calling for a standout performance by a Sun Devil - see how easy that is? - to tilt the game in ASU's favor. Perhaps junior linebacker Christian Sam (#3 in FBS in solo tackles) can slow down Finley and his fellow pack members.

The Chicken: Arizona State by 12

*

The Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl
Kentucky Wildcats vs. Northwestern Wildcats (-8)
3:30 p.m. ESPN (Nissan Stadium in Nashville, TN)

As someone famous once said, "Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation, and every city or house divided against itself will not stand." We prefer the simplified version by some other guy: "A house divided against itself cannot stand." In this case, the Reporter's Residence is split down the middle: one half for the Wildcats of the Kentucky persuasion and another for Northwestern.

CFR pick: We like the Wildcats.

The Chicken: Northwestern by 2

*

The Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl
New Mexico State Aggies vs. Utah State Aggies (-4.5)
4:30 p.m. CBSSN (Arizona Stadium in Tucson, AZ)

The Aggies take on the . . . Aggies, this afternoon on CBS! The Aggies squared, if you will. Aggies to the second power. What is Aggies times Aggies? Aggies.

CFR pick: Go Aggies.

The Chicken: Aggies by 14

*

The Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic
#8 USC Trojans vs. #5 Ohio State Buckeyes (-7.5)
7:30 p.m. ESPN (AT&T Stadium in Arlington, TX)

This year the Cotton Bowl has the questionable fortune of hosting the Also-Ran Classic matching up two would-be contenders for the College Football Playoff. Despite lobbying from the likes of Michigan HC Jim Harbaugh, the playoff system has yet to expand past four teams, so for now the qualifying criteria are simple: You have to win games. Ohio State dropped an excusable early game to another top-ranked team (#2 Oklahoma on September 9) yet was still in the hunt as OSU reeled off six wins including a thrilling squeaker over #9 Penn State before traipsing into Iowa City for a 55-24 shredding by the Hawkeyes. Voters couldn't let it go, and despite wins later in the year over #18 Michigan State, rival Michigan and #6 Wisconsin to close out the season, the Buckeyes ended up in Arlington.

USC couldn't get over two losses of their own. The Trojans lost by a FG to #21 Washington State in early September and took a licking from #14 Notre Dame, 49-14. Wipe out either loss and, considering USC rounded out the season defeating #15 Stanford 31-28, Southern Cal could have had an argument to place in the top four.

The Cotton Bowl is nothing to sneeze at, mind, however this type of game tends to favor whichever team can get "up" for the occasion, making predictions difficult as otherwise reliable lines of analysis (offense vs. defense, turnover tendencies, performance against similar or like opponents) can go out the window if one squad decides playing a premier primetime match-up just isn't worth the energy.

CFR pick: This one comes down to which team has the best haircut. There's no question about this angle. Southern Cal QB Sam Darnold wins hands down. Look at that finely coiffed mane.

The Chicken: Ohio State by 11

* "Wolfpack" appears on the list twice for NC State and Nevada.

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Previously:

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 1. Keywords: AutoNation, Dreamstyle Remodeling, Las Vegas, Mountain Dew Mouth, North Texas Mean Green, Raycom, Troy Trojans.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 2. Executives at Cheribundi no doubt would have preferred a more competitive game. Having signed on as the bowl sponsor until 2019, Cheribundi needed the contest to attract at least some marginal attention to bolster the awareness of its tart cherry beverages nationwide.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 3. In this world of uncertainty, the Potato Bowl remains our rock.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 4. Overlapping with the NFL schedule this weekend provides a gift to bettors: putting action on pro/bowl teasers.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report Bowl Game Preview Part 5: Introducing The Fourth Down Stupidity Index, starring Northern Illinois University. Oh, Huskies!

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:43 AM | Permalink

CEO-Worker Income Gap Higher In U.S. Than Anywhere Else: Analysis

As corporations and wealthy individuals across the United States are slated to benefit from massive tax breaks thanks to the GOP's latest tax legislation, a Bloomberg analysis published Thursday found that chief executives of American companies already make 265 times the amount of money an average worker is paid - the largest CEO-worker income gap in the world.

"CEOs of the biggest publicly traded U.S. companies averaged $14.3 million in annual pay, more than double that of their Canadian counterparts and 10 times greater than those in India," according to Bloomberg. While India ranked second on Bloomberg's CEO pay-to-average income ratio, Indian chief executives made about a tenth of their American counterparts' incomes, averaging $1.46 million annually.

"There are myriad reasons for compensation discrepancies between executives," Bloomberg notes. "The U.S. is home to several of the world's largest corporations, which tend to pay more. Cost of living is often higher in North America and Western Europe than some parts of Asia. And even the mere disclosure of detailed figures can push pay higher as boards set CEOs' compensation in line with their peers."

The new analysis comes as a security filing by Apple - one of the largest public companies in the United States - revealed on Wednesday that the company gave CEO Tim Cook and some of its other executives major raises.

The Wall Street Journal reports Cook's "total compensation for the fiscal year, which ended in September, jumped 47 percent - to $12.8 million - the largest bump among the five executives listed in Apple's annual proxy filing," notably "driven by his cash bonus, which was hinged on exceeding the revenue and profit targets set by the board."

"Apple's other highest-paid executives received smaller increases in total compensation, according to Wednesday's filing, each rising about 6 percent to just over $24 million from just under $23 million a year ago," the Journal reports. "Compensation for each included about $1 million in salary, $20 million in restricted stock, and $3.1 million in cash for performance."

Although Cook's yearly compensation is lower than that of other Apple executives, the Journal notes that "the number is somewhat misleading because of a large restricted stock grant he received in 2011. About 560,000 shares of that award vested in fiscal 2017 that were valued at $89.2 million" - pushing the Apple CEO's 2017 total payout beyond $100 million.

While Cook's yearly income is substantial, it's less than half of what was given to the highest-paid chief executive in 2016. As CNBC reported in July, the executive who was paid the most last year was Marc Lore, CEO of e-commerce at Walmart, who made $243.9 million. He was followed by Sundar Pichai, CEO of Alphabet's Google, who made $199.7 million, and Robert J. Coury, the chairman of the pharmaceutical company Mylan, who made $136.8 million.

Last year's CEO-to-worker compensation ratio, calculated by the Economic Policy Institute, was 271-to-1, with the chief executives of American companies seeing an average of $15.6 million in annual compensation. The EPI report, which was published in July, notes that "regardless of how it's measured, CEO pay continues to be very, very high and has grown far faster in recent decades than typical worker pay," and "exorbitant CEO pay means that the fruits of economic growth are not going to ordinary workers."

EPI president Lawrence Mischel and research assistant Jessica Schieder found that CEO compensation rose "by 807 or 937 percent (depending on how it is measured - using stock options granted or stock options realized, respectively) from 1978 to 2016." They argue that "exorbitant CEO compensation . . . has fueled the growth of the top 1 percent incomes" at the expense of "the vast majority of workers."

"Simply put, money that goes to the executive class is money that does not go to other people. Rising executive pay is not connected to overall growth in the economic pie," Mishel says, as Common Dreams previously reported. "We could curtail the explosive growth in CEO pay without doing any harm to the economy."

In response to their findings in July, Mishel and Schieder proposed the following policy solutions:

* Reinstate higher marginal income tax rates at the very top.

* Remove the tax break for executive performance pay.

* Set corporate tax rates higher for firms that have higher ratios of CEO-to-worker compensation.

* Allow greater use of "say on pay," which allows a firm's shareholders to vote on top executives' compensation.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:55 AM | Permalink

December 28, 2017

The Paradise Papers: The Long Twilight Struggle Against Offshore Secrecy

Dear Steve,

Here we are, the final e-mail from ICIJ for the year - and what a year it has been!

Today we have our latest piece of Paradise Papers coverage for you - reflecting the groundswell of action ICIJ's projects on offshore secrecy have created. We're hoping it continues in the new year!

We also calculated how much money tax authorities across the world have recouped since we published the Panama Papers in April last year - more than $500 million (and counting!)

And in true holiday spirit, we have insight into what our team members (though maybe not me!) are doing this holiday season.

paradiseyearend.jpg

Finally, I'd like to thank you all for your support. Our weekly e-mails have received amazing reactions from most of you - e-mails of gratitude and tips about what we should cover next!

It's also the last chance for you to support ICIJ financially before the end of the year. We want to raise $100,000, and News Match is still matching gifts until Dec. 31, so now's the perfect time to donate. If you want to make a donation there are so many ways. You can use Facebook, PayPal, online payments, you can mail us a check and you even can get yourself a Snax Haven sticker!

snaxhavenlogofinal.jpg

And if your employer matches donations, don't forget to ask for that match.

Until next time! (And next year!)

Amy Wilson-Chapman
ICIJ's Community Engagement Editor

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Previously in The Paradise Papers:
* 'Paradise Papers' Reveal Tax Avoidance, Shady Dealings Of World's Rich And Powerful.

* Just How Much Money Is Held Offshore? Hint: A SHIT-TON.

* Development Dreams Lost In The Offshore World.

* Keeping Offshore 'Hush Hush,' But Why?

* Tax Havens Are Alive With The Sound Of Music.

* Today In Tax Avoidance Of The Ultra-Wealthy.

* Go To Town With This Offshore Leaks Database.

* The Paradise Papers: The View From Africa And Asia.

* The Paradise Papers: The End Of Elusion For PokerStars.

* The Paradise Papers: An Odd Call From The Bermuda Government.

* The Paradise Papers: Nevis Is An Offshore Haven Of Opportunity

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Previously in The Panama Papers:
* The Panama Papers: Remarkable Global Media Collaboration Cracks Walls Of Offshore Tax Haven Secrecy.

* The Panama Papers: Prosecutors Open Probes.

* The [Monday] Papers.

* Adventures In Tax Avoidance.

* Mossack Fonseca's Oligarchs, Dictators And Corrupt White-Collar Businessmen.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! They're All In It Together.

* Meet The Panama Papers Editor Who Handled 376 Reporters In 80 Countries.

Previously in other tax scammage:
* Deepwater Horizon Settlement Comes With $5.35 Billion Tax Windfall.

* Offshoring By 29 Companies Costs Illinois $1.2 Billion Annually.

* Government Agencies Allow Corporations To Write Off Billions In Federal Settlements.

* The Gang Of 62 Vs. The World.

* How The Maker Of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing.

* $1.4 Trillion: Oxfam Exposes The Great Offshore Tax Scam Of U.S. Companies.

* How Barclay's Turned A $10 Billion Profit Into A Tax Loss.

* Wall Street Stock Loans Drain $1 Billion A Year From German Taxpayers.

* German Finance Minister Cries Foul Over Tax Avoidance Deals.

* Prosecutor Targets Commerzbank For Deals That Dodge German Taxes.

* A Schlupfloch Here, A Schlupfloch There. Now It's Real Money.

* How Milwaukee Landlords Avoid Taxes.

* Study: 32 Illinois Fortune 500 Companies Holding At Least $147 Billion Offshore.

* Watch Out For The Coming Tax Break Trickery.

* When A 'Tax Bonanza' Is Actually A Huge Corporate Tax Break.

* The Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump.

* Oxfam Names World's Worst Tax Havens Fueling 'Global Race To Bottom.'

* Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Illinois Small Business $5,789 A Year.

* State Tax Incentives To Corporations Don't Work.

* GOP Tax Plan Would Give 15 Of America's Largest Corporations A $236 Billion Tax Cut.

* Triumph Of The Oligarchs.

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Previously in carried interest, aka The Billionaire's Loophole:
* Patriotic Millionaires Vs. Carried Interest.

* The Somewhat Surreal Politics Of A Private Equity Tax Loophole Costing Us Billions (That Obama Refused To Close Despite Pledging To Do So).

* Fact-Checking Trump & Clinton On The Billionaire's Tax Break.

* Despite Trump Campaign Promise, Billionaires' Tax Loophole Survives Again.

* Carried Interest Reform Is a Sham.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:25 PM | Permalink

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 5

Boston College quietly claimed the top spot in the newly coined College Football Report Fourth Down Stupidity Index. A column by ESPN's Gregg Easterbrook in 2009 convinced us that too few coaches make (seemingly) aggressive play calls on fourth down. A great example took place on Wednesday. As Easterbrook called out, faced with anything short of a now-or-never decision, head coaches (and Easterbrook was speaking of the NFL but the same holds true at the collegiate level) default to playing it by the book. Or so it would seem but the book, or conventional wisdom, call it what you will, makes no sense unless you're looking to avoid mockery on message forums and drunken tirades from upset boosters. Fourth down on your own side of the 50? Punt. (For that matter, most coaches will often punt even if in opposing territory as most college kickers* can't handle field goals over 50 yards.) In the red zone but not at the goal line? Kick the field goal.

If you thought Northern Illinois University's ill-advised attempt to convert 4th-and-18 from the Huskies' own end zone was asinine, you'd be right. Trailing by a touchdown in the first quarter of the Quick Lane Bowl on Tuesday, NIU inexplicably called a fake punt. To be clear, we are not advocating for this level of outright insanity.

However unless you were watching The New Era Pinstripe Bowl closely Wednesday, you might have missed an equally dumb decision. The Iowa Hawkeyes (narrowly favored by 2.5) faced off against the Boston College Eagles in Yankees Stadium in frigid conditions on a frosted-over playing surface. (Players reportedly switched to sneakers as running in cleats yielded as much traction as ice skates.)

Midway through the fourth quarter, after punting on three consecutive possessions, the Eagles drove from their own 39 deep into Hawkeyes territory. Trailing 20-17, the offense suddenly showed signs of life on a bomb to the Iowa 7. However, the BC attack bogged down and ground to a halt at 3rd-and-goal from the Iowa 6. Following an incomplete pass, BC coach Steve Addazio weighed his options. In fact, Addazio mulled over the decision for so long, he squandered a precious timeout, hemmed, hawed, and ultimately called in the kicker who successfully converted a 24-yard chip shot to knot the game 20-20. BC coughed up the ball on its two ensuing possessions, ultimately ending the match in a whimper to lose by a touchdown.

You may have lived to play another season, Addazio, but why? BC never had another opportunity in the red zone. It's a bowl game, there's nothing left to play for other than a win. Failing the fourth-and-goal would have pinned Iowa deep and most likely yielded a punt, with BC resuming midfield. We're putting BC at 100 on the 2017 Bowl Season FDS.

* Notable exceptions include kickers Bryce Crawford of San Jose State (5-of-8 from 50+ in 2017), Matt Gay of Utah (5-of-6), Daniel Carlson of Auburn (4-of-7), Matthew McCrane of Kansas State (3-of-6), and Erik Powell of Washington State (3-of-4) among others. Nice job, boys. Fifty yards is far. For those who have ever doubted the value of a kicker with an accurate and lengthy boot, consider Matt Gay's 2017 stats: 40-of-40 on extra point attempts and 30-of-34 on FGs, with a long of 56 yards. Gay is the college kicker equivalent of Steph Curry: virtually anywhere past midfield is in range.

Can't picture how far 56 yards is? Try this: if you lined up eight 1975 Cadillac Fleetwood 75s nose to tail - the Fleetwood was the longest four-door passenger car ever produced, measuring ~244 inches - you would still need an extra five feet in distance. Never mind that you'd have to clear the cross bar, a height just shy of Manute Bol's arm reach. (That is his flat-footed reach. No jumping allowed, Manute. Let's keep it fair.) You got this.

As an aside, how fun would it be to give special teams coaches the option of fielding a defender at the cross bar and allow goaltending? Programs could opt to squander a roster spot for a true special-teams player: put the basketball team's center on speed dial and call him in whenever the opposing team lines up for a ridiculously long kick. The odds of suffering a last-second loss on a desperately long kick would go from slim to none. Suddenly long attempts would take on an extra layer of drama. Bouncing in a 56-yard kick off the cross bar? Get that out of here! Kickers would have to get creative and go all bumper pool to avoid rejection such as the 46-yarder by South Alabama back in October that boinked the upright, ricocheted off the cross bar twice, and in.

A brief rundown on Thursday's match-ups:

The Military Bowl Presented by Northrup Grumman
Virginia Cavaliers vs. Navy Midshipmen (-1.5)
12:30 p.m. ESPN (at Navy-Marine Corp Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, MD)

CFR pick: This is a no-brainer. Go Navy!

The Chicken: Navy by 22

*

The Camping World Bowl
#22 Virginia Tech Hokies vs. #19 Oklahoma State Cowboys (-5.5)
4:15 p.m. ESPN (Camping World Stadium in Orlando, FL)

CFR pick: Va Tech has always been known for touch special teams and given the nature of this column, let's go with the Hokies and take the points.

The Chicken: VT by 9

*

The Valermo Alamo Bowl
#13 Stanford Cardinal vs. #15 Texas Christian Horned Frogs (-3)
8 p.m. ESPN (Alamodome in San Antonio, TX)

We love this game. Can we play the Alamo Bowl in the Alamo from now on? That would make it the Alamo Bowl in the Alamodome at the Alamo.

CFR pick: TCU may have home field(ish) advantage, but Stanford can play the "no one respects us" card. Plus, West Coast teams don't necessarily get the love deserved from the betting public. Stanford it is.

The Chicken: Stanford by 7

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The San Diego County Credit Union Holiday Bowl
#18 Washington State Cougars vs. #16 Michigan State (-2.5)
8 p.m. ESPN (SDCCU Stadium in San Diego, CA)

Let's get this straight: the SDCCUHB will be played in SDCCU Stadium? Got it. Just making sure.

CFR pick: We never believe in the Big Ten. Once again, we'll take the West Coast.

The Chicken: Michigan State by 16

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Previously:

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 1. Keywords: AutoNation, Dreamstyle Remodeling, Las Vegas, Mountain Dew Mouth, North Texas Mean Green, Raycom, Troy Trojans.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 2. Executives at Cheribundi no doubt would have preferred a more competitive game. Having signed on as the bowl sponsor until 2019, Cheribundi needed the contest to attract at least some marginal attention to bolster the awareness of its tart cherry beverages nationwide.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 3. In this world of uncertainty, the Potato Bowl remains our rock.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 4. Overlapping with the NFL schedule this weekend provides a gift to bettors: putting action on pro/bowl teasers.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:52 AM | Permalink

The [Thursday] Papers

"Three people in Cook County have died due to cold exposure since mid-November, including a 62-year-old man found in a vehicle Tuesday morning in the Austin neighborhood," the Sun-Times reports.

"With temperatures not expected to eclipse the mid-teens until after New Year's Day, Chicago's homeless shelters have become packed with people looking for a respite from the extreme conditions.

"It's life and death out there," said Stephen Welch, director of development at the Pacific Garden Mission in Pilsen. "I talked to a couple of guys who thought they were going to die today. They could barely move."

From the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless's Twitter feed:

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New on the Beachwood today . . .

The World's Greatest College Football Report Fourth Down Stupidity Index/Bowl Preview Part 5 Featuring Manute Bol And the 1975 Cadillac Fleetwood
Featuring the Northern Illinois Huskies, the Boston College Eagles and the Alamo Bowl in the Alamodome at the Alamo.

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Vikings Film Room: The Bears' Offense
Mitch Trubisky's growing pains and shitty passing personnel vs. Jordan Howard's proficiency in the zone running game.

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ChicagoGram

#JosieBaker aka #ChicagoJoan aka #SheSheLaMoor #CraveArt #HoodComix

A post shared by Joël Maximé, Jr. (@cravechicago) on

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ChicagoTube

Chicago Song/Stu Larsen & Natsuki Karai.

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BeachBook

The Real Lucy Parsons.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

Why is it so hard for Twitter and Facebook to get it right? It must be super profitable for them not to.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Retronculous.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:34 AM | Permalink

Vikings Film Room: The Bears' Offense

Mitch Trubisky's growing pains and shitty passing personnel vs. Jordan Howard's proficiency in the zone running game.


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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:16 AM | Permalink

December 27, 2017

The [Wednesday] Papers

"In a community that once billed itself as the most industrialized city in America, elected leaders for the second time this year have voiced opposition to a proposed industrial permit," the Northwest Indiana Times reports out of East Chicago.

"The City Council last month voted 8-0 to adopt a resolution opposing an air permit application for Indiana Harbor Coke Co. without 'an aggressive schedule of compliance.' Mayor Anthony Copeland signed the resolution."

It's a start.

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"Midwestern cities often side with companies and economic growth, said Mark Templeton, director of the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic at the University of Chicago.

"While he was not familiar with the details surrounding the Indiana Harbor Coke Co. permit application, Templeton said it's generally a big deal when communities take a stand like East Chicago's elected leaders have done."

FYI from Abrams' website: "The Abrams Environmental Law clinic attempts to solve some of the most pressing environmental problems throughout Chicago, the State of Illinois, and the Great Lakes region. On behalf of clients, the clinic challenges those who pollute illegally, fights for stricter permits, advocates for changes to regulations and laws, holds environmental agencies accountable, and develops innovative approaches for improving the environment."

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Back to the Times:

"Thomas Frank, a board member for the Southeast Environmental Task Force, East Chicago resident and member of the Community Strategy Group, said residents' values are changing.

"'We're seeing the representative leaders following the interests of the community,' he said. 'They're saying, No, we don't want this anymore. We don't have to trade our health for jobs. We don't have to trade our health for economic development. We want both.'"

Links mine

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Previously:

-> Flawed CDC Report Left East Chicago Children Vulnerable To Lead Poisoning.

-> East Chicago Is Toxic.

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New on the Beachwood today . . .

Amid State Cuts, A Texas High School Football Coach Got A $20,000 Raise. His District Says He's Earned It. (And A Jumbotron.)
"This comes at a time when Carthage ISD also lost $6.9 million after a state funding program primarily supporting rural, oil-dependent school Texas districts expired, forcing hundreds of school leaders to take red pens to their budgets. Carthage ISD raised local property taxes, slashed most teacher benefits, packed students in classrooms, and cut 32.5 teaching, security, transportation and administrative positions."

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ChicagoGram

Pepperoni Chair, get ready for tomorrow!

A post shared by Helen Sanchez (@helen_sanzcor) on

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ChicagoTube

"Goin' To Chicago"/Van Morrison & Chris Farlowe

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BeachBook

Zerious Meadows Was Sentenced To Life Without Parole At 17. Now He's Struggling With Freedom.

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Meet (And Listen To) The CSO's Principal Clarinetist.

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Che, Stalin, Mussolini And The Intellectuals Who Loved Them.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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And so am I.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Think, dammit. Think.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:54 AM | Permalink

Amid State Cuts, A Texas High School Football Coach Got A $20,000 Raise. His District Says He's Earned It.

CARTHAGE, TEXAS - Watching his players dart up and down the field during a recent game, Carthage High head football coach Scott Surratt anxiously anticipated every pass, penalty and fumble, sometimes needing to be stopped from charging onto the turf.

A local profile of the man who has brought five state football championships to Carthage ISD refers to his arrival 10 years ago as "the best thing that could have happened to a lackluster football program." Fans packing the stands dressed in "Bulldawg" red declare themselves lucky that he took the team's reins. Though Surratt has had opportunities to coach at larger high schools and at the college level, he's opted to stay in this small East Texas town 150 miles southeast of Dallas.

"I got very lucky, very lucky to get the job," Surratt told The Texas Tribune. "[Our players] represent the seal on their helmet and do it with pride and play unbelievably hard for the community."

As he succeeds on the field, Surratt, who's also the district's athletic director, has been rewarded off of it. Carthage ISD increased his salary this year by $21,400, the district's biggest administrative pay raise this year. With a total salary of $154,900, Surratt is paid just a little less than the high school football coach in Lake Travis, where the district's student body is nearly four times larger and its median income is six figures. Carthage ISD's median income is $49,886, a few thousand below the state average.

This comes at a time when Carthage ISD also lost $6.9 million after a state funding program primarily supporting rural, oil-dependent school Texas districts expired, forcing hundreds of school leaders to take red pens to their budgets. Carthage ISD raised local property taxes, slashed most teacher benefits, packed students in classrooms, and cut 32.5 teaching, security, transportation and administrative positions.

Carthage_football_3.jpgScott Surratt/Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

Should districts like Carthage ISD increase administrative or athletic salaries when they are millions of dollars in the red? Local district officials argue many critics fundamentally misunderstand school budgets: Surratt paid for his own raise by bumping ticket sales and earning championship prize money.

Screen Shot 2017-12-27 at 9.57.52 AM.png

Each year, school communities across the state are debating where and how to trim while doing the least harm. School budgeting was a hot topic during this summer's special legislative session, when Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and Senate Republicans argued that schools weren't spending efficiently, and they unsuccessfully pushed a measure requiring districts to "reprioritize" existing money to guarantee teacher raises. "[Districts] have to be better about how they spend the money. They have to put more focus on teachers," Patrick said at a July news conference.

Education groups argued Patrick's plan would require districts to cut other staff such as instructional aides, who support teachers in the classroom.

The issue gets more complicated as state cuts to schools become more standard, experts and public education advocates say. It's not always easy to tell whether school administrators, with limited options, are prioritizing cuts in a way that benefits students, teachers and families. The real problem worth discussing, many argue, is that schools are subsisting on meager funds.

A recent report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a left-leaning think tank, shows that Texas made among the deepest cuts to public education in the last decade, compared with other states.

"The school district budget, while it may seem large, on a per-student basis is probably the most efficient budget in the city or county, wherever the school district is located," said Tracy Ginsburg, executive director of the Texas Association of School Business Officials, a nonprofit organization that analyzes school finance. "I think there was a time where school districts could become more efficient. That is in the back mirror."

Personnel makes up about 80 percent of school spending, so "if you need significant savings, it's hard to do that without looking at staffing," said Greg Gibson, an Austin-based consultant who has helped about 150 districts, many of them in Texas, spend more efficiently over the last 25 years.

Screen Shot 2017-12-27 at 9.59.09 AM.png

Many districts start like Carthage ISD did by cutting back staff, consolidating positions and not filling positions vacated by staff members who retired or left, Gibson said. Smaller districts are by definition more efficient, with many people already serving more functions, meaning they face a bigger challenge in finding savings, he added.

But some don't always agree with the methods of consolidation. After learning that Surratt's raise was coming while teachers' aides and bus monitors were being let go, Felita Ewins held a small protest outside the district administration building on the first day of school. An alumna of Carthage public schools, Ewins has grandsons who participate in athletics at the high school.

"They do all of the sports . . . but it's not going to get them an education," she said. "That's uneven footing, if you want to cut someone that's helping them academically and give a raise to a department where it's not going to help them academically."

Carthage ISD district sits on one of the country's largest natural gas reserves. The dip in natural gas prices means Carthage is currently low on revenue, and the state's decision not to renew a funding program further hurts the district. Carthage ISD will send about $9.5 million to the state this year, through the "Robin Hood" provision of the state school funding system, which requires districts with higher property values to subsidize those with lower values.

Glenn_Hambrick_Carthage_MKC.jpgSupt. Glenn Hambrick/Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

In the next few years, if values don't rise organically, Superintendent Glenn Hambrick said, Carthage ISD will have to ask the community to vote to raise taxes again because the tax rate is far below the maximum allowed by state law.

Hambrick said he donated his own $5,000 salary increase back to the school district. But he argued that Surratt has earned his raise by bringing large crowds into the stadium. When Carthage ISD won the state championship game last year, the league sent over a check for $32,357. "We would save a lot of money initially if we changed football coaches . . . But if we didn't make the playoffs anymore, we would lose that income," he said. "He justifies his salary by the amount of money or revenue the program brings in."

Surratt's salary is part of Carthage ISD's extracurricular budget, which makes up just 4.7 percent of all spending.

Ewins doesn't buy Hambrick's claim. With almost 20 positions cut in academic departments throughout the district, she says, why not use the football revenue to save a teacher's salary? Fans will fill the stands either way, like they did when she was a young girl.

She acknowledges she's in the minority. Residents in the school district, who number about 16,700, are crazy about their high school team. The 400-member booster club raised $119,360 between January and October to supplement the school's athletic budget. Cutting any athletic program would harm students who use sports as an emotional outlet for difficult home lives, said Andy Dawson, head of the booster club and the father of a Carthage High junior who wants to go into sports medicine. For some, football provides a more realistic financial pathway to college, he said.

Football is unlikely to see major changes, though Carthage ISD administrators could eventually have to consider cutting elective courses and extracurricular programs. Potentially on the chopping block is a free, dual-credit program with local Panola College, in which Carthage ISD now pays for students' tuition and books, said Jason Harris, the high school's principal.

"Teacher morale is one thing I have to focus on. Every teacher here had a pay cut [with the reduced contribution to health insurance]. They're bringing home less money than they did and working the same amount of time," Harris said. "I have to think long and hard about positions and moving people and retaining teachers."

He described the state funding cut as a "cloud that's hanging over" the district and its staff.

Few understand the shadow that cloud casts more than Chris Stacy, high school academic coordinator and former coach. He was supposed to be promoted to assistant principal at Carthage High School, but the district realized they couldn't pay him an administrator's salary. Instead, he has cobbled together a similar role using stipends to boost his pay, while teaching math classes, supervising lunches, coordinating teachers and driving a school bus.

"You lose a lot of extra services you were able to provide your students," he said.

Carthage ISD caught a lot of heat for one specific extravagance, the crown jewel of its football field: a $750,000, four-camera Jumbotron, reportedly the biggest high school screen of its kind when it was installed in 2012. That's not a spending decision the district made alone, Hambrick said, sounding weary of repeating an answer he's given many times. About 73 percent of Carthage ISD residents who voted agreed to pay for the screen in a bond election; the money comes from a self-imposed hike in property taxes, not from school coffers.

Carthage_football_2.jpgJumbotron/Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

"We didn't throw it out there as anything other than what it is: a $750,000 luxury item," he said. It took just over a month for taxpayers to pay it off.

For Ewins, the scoreboard is a reminder of a priority she does not share with her neighbors.

"That tells you what the mindset is here in Panola County. They voted to have taxes raised so we could have a scoreboard," she said, with a laugh. "They're blind to anything else as long as we get to go to these football games. You'd think it was the Dallas Cowboys."

Hambrick ascribes the pride the community takes in its football team to a loftier motive: "A lot of East Texas communities, kids are graduating, moving out, and not coming back . . . Carthage thinks differently. They want to have a place kids want to come back to."

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:54 AM | Permalink

December 26, 2017

The [Tuesday] Papers

Here's something I want to get off my chest before the year ends: The plethora of stories about a Moe's Tavern pop-up failed to mention that Chicago already has a permanent Moe's Tavern.

(Okay, I don't know if all the stories failed to mention that, because I didn't do my usual due diligence of digging into the archives on this one, but I'm pretty sure from my general impression based upon my reading experience that the failure was widespread, if not total!)

Chicago's real Moe's Tavern is a pretty great bar - good beer selection, fairly priced; live music that's not bad and sometimes really good; a free foosball table; and a jukebox, even if it's of the internet variety, as seems to be the case almost everywhere these days, sadly.

I dig it.

Also, they once got a cease-and-desist order from Fox, proudly framed on premises.

canddmoes2.jpg

To satisfy Fox, they altered the Simpsons characters just enough to pass legal muster (at least that's what I was told, and it appears to be true).

moestavernreal.jpg

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Barely related note: I had a floor hockey team for eight years that was named Moe's Tavern. We started out awful, but awfully fun, and ended up winning three championships in six trips to the Finals. In one, I scored the winning goal with just seconds left - one of the true highlights of my life. The Moe's pennant Beachwood site designer Cate Nolan made after our first championship hung in the Beachwood Inn until its demise - even surviving a theft that was pretty humorously resolved (a story for another time).

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P.S.: I'm now much more of a Family Guy person than a Simpsons person, but still.

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P.P.S.: Those photos are mine, I took them on my first visit to Moe's.

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New on the Beachwood today . . .

Bears Prove They Are Better Than The Browns On At Least One Given Sunday
Tried to give the game away; Cleveland didn't bite.

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The Weekend In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Red Francis, Black Bear Radio, The Hush Sound, Tiesto, and A Story Unwritten.

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ICYMI on the Beachwood since the holiday . . .

Beachwood Sports Radio: Are The Bulls, Um, Good?
Is this really happening? Plus: Are The Blackhawks, Um, Good?; The Cubs Are Having An Interesting Offseason!; Can Loyola Ramble Into The Dance?; and The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview.

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The World's Greatest College Bowl Preview Part 4
Overlapping with the NFL schedule this weekend provides a gift to bettors: putting action on pro/bowl teasers.

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ChicagoGram

Peace on earth.

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

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ChicagoTube

Pajaritos!

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BeachBook
A sampling.

An Astonishing Story About How The Mexican Government Controls That Country's News Media. Wow.

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A History Of The War On Christmas.

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Both Trump And The Nazis Used Christmas To Promote White Nationalism.

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Porcupine For Dinner: Christmas In Early Wisconsin.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

Until everybody has written it. And then every year.

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And their own comfort.

As with Trump supporters, as the previous tweets indicate. The media is in such a rush to make sure we don't label all Trump voters racist that they fail to label any but the most extreme white nationalists as such. That is a major journalism fail.

Related, from Vox earlier this month: "The Past Year Of Research Has Made It Very Clear: Trump Won Because Of Racial Resentment | Another study produces the same findings we've seen over and over again."

Dear Journos: Reckon with reality. This is the country we live in. These people are among our citizens. They are legion; you missed it.

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Tip: Go back and read the transcripts (or watch the video) of Trump's campaign rallies - most of you seem to have missed them in real time. They are chilling. He basically ran as a Nazi. That is not hyperbole. He didn't hide who he was, or whose causes he was championing, or who surrounded, supported and enabled him. It was - and remains - right in your face.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Get it right.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:06 PM | Permalink

The Weekend In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Red Francis at Demma's in Oak Lawn on Saturday night.


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2. Black Bear Rodeo at Demma's in Oak Lawn on Saturday night.

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3. The Hush Sound at Thalia Hall on Friday night.

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4. Tiesto at the Aragon on Saturday night.

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Catching up with . . .

A Story Unwritten at the Forge in Joliet on December 17th.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:54 AM | Permalink

December 25, 2017

Bears Prove They Are Better Than The Browns On At Least One Given Sunday

"There might be a very different feel about Trubisky [and the Bears] today if Carl Nassib had taken one step back before the first snap of the second half," Dan Pompeii writes.

This was the play. Nassib lines up correctly, and the score would've been 10-6 Browns, presuming they kick the PAT. Turning point!

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"Fox will pay the price for GM Ryan Pace's failures, and it remains to be seen whether Pace will keep his job. Assuming he does, it will be entertaining to watch Pace spin his three-year record, which improved to an impressive 14-33 Sunday as the Bears defeated the winless Browns before a half-empty Soldier Field," Barry Rozner writes for the Daily Herald.

It's difficult to remember a time when the Bears were less relevant or interesting, and the fans have stayed away in droves during the second half of this season.

Pace has won six games, three games and five games in his three seasons and ought to go the way of Fox.

Any explanation to the contrary will be met with screams - and not screams of joy.

But if he stays, McCaskey, Phillips and Pace will stand before you and pretend the Bears won 10 games and made the playoffs this season.

Go read the rest - it's the day's best take.

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The worst take? We return to Pompeii:

"I wonder what the Bears' record would have been if they would have had a normal year for injuries."

Did last year not happen? Is this not the new normal under this crew? Did they really have more - and more consequential - injuries than other teams? Ask the Packers about that!

My God.

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This list of teams hit hardest by injuries was through Week 12, the most recent I could find: The Bears don't make it.

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"All of the stories you've heard about the Browns are true. Wow, Cleveland is bad," Jeff Dickerson writes for ESPN.

"The Bears aren't a whole lot better," he adds.

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More Dickerson:

"Truth be told, the Browns had opportunities to make it a game. But each time, almost on cue, Cleveland would mess it up."

In other words, the Browns are so bad the Bears couldn't even give away the game, hard as they tried.

"[T]he Bears led only 6-3 at halftime, and the Browns had a near pick-six called back because of an offside penalty. The Browns also fumbled close to the goal line. It's not like the Bears played exceptionally well. Cleveland's defense had way too many free shots on Trubisky, and the Bears really struggled to identify pressure when the Browns hit them with stunts off the edge. Fox also lost another challenge. But what else is new?"

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:28 PM | Permalink

December 24, 2017

The [War On Merry Christmas] Weekend Desk Report

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TV Funhouse: The Narrator Who Ruined Christmas.

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Debbie Downer: Christmas Eve with Santa Claus.

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Dear Megyn Kelly:

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From Beachwood past:

"Santa denied permission to buzz the tower at O'Hare. "That's a negative, Ghostrider. The pattern is full."

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"Whatcha packin', Santa? "Let me tell you what Melba Toast is packin' right here, all right. We got 4:11 Positrac outback, 750 double pumper, Edelbrock intake, bored over 30, 11 to 1 pop-up pistons, turbo-jet 390 horsepower. We're talkin' some fuckin' muscle."

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My roommate went to Jewel and it was closed.

Me: "But it says Jew right in the name!"

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Sleigh apparently in the shop.

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Family Guy Jesus. Click-through for a real history lesson.

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New on the Beachwood this weekend . . .

The Week In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Constantine, Monomania, The Handcuffs, Daisychain, Todd Rundgren, Wax Fang, Cryptopsy, Belphegor, and Jimmy Degenerate & the NotSeez.

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The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 4
Overlapping with the NFL schedule this weekend provides a gift to bettors: putting action on pro/bowl teasers.

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The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #180: Are The Bulls, Um, Good?
Is this really happening? Plus: Are The Blackhawks, Um, Good?; The Cubs Are Having An Interesting Offseason!; Can Loyola Ramble Into The Dance?; and The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview.

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Weekend ChicagoGram

Quimby's NYC.

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Weekend ChicagoTube

Sabbath '71.

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Weekend BeachBook

New Documents Show Tiananmen Square Death Toll Was 10,000.

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Gov't Docs Show Laura Poitras Cleared After 6-Year Fishing Expedition.

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Washington State Says Comcast Stole At Least $73 Million From Subscribers Over 5 Years.

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How University Admissions Are Biased Despite What The Percentages Say.

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Your Weekend Must-Read: The Story Of Reality Winner.

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The Billion-Dollar Loophole.

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UN Investigator On Extreme Poverty Issues A Grim Report - On The U.S.

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Jon Stewart: Obama Totally Lying About NSA Spying.

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It's (Dash-Cam) Sabotage.

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How The High Museum In Atlanta Tripled Its Non-White Audience In Two Years.

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Weekend TweetWood
A sampling.

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Rporters shouldn't "clear" suspected sources - it helps narrow the field of possibilities.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Consult.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:44 AM | Permalink

December 23, 2017

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 4

A short list of games round out the first week of bowl season. This weekend will see a rare intersection of the college and pro schedule with three bowls Saturday coinciding with Colts-Ravens (3:30 p.m.) and Vikings-Packers (7:30 p.m.) followed by the NFL's full slate and a lone bowl on Sunday.

The tail end of the regular season always attracted a mix bag of NFL fans: in addition to the diehards, a small number of contrarians (although we'd prefer realists) perversely root for their squad to bomb and thus improve draft position (ahemBEARSahem), fans of teams in the hunt watch with one eye on the scoreboard particularly for teams still technically in contention due to the NFL's arcane tie-breaking rules, and, even otherwise meaningless games draw passionate interest from fantasy owners. (For most fantasy leagues the playoff championship culminates this weekend.)

However we find another aspect of the overlapping schedules most intriguing: putting action on pro and college "teasers." (See some examples here.) Love the dogs? Tease the Colts (+19.5) with Army (+12.5) on Saturday. Prefer frontrunners? Buy the Patriots (-11.5) down to -5.5 and Toledo to a Pick (favored by -6.5). The latter looks especially attractive: a two-team tease gets you a 6 and 6.5 swing, asking an otherwise healthy favorite (Toledo) just to win and dropping an otherwise intimidating spread (Patriots) to under one touchdown. (Check this out for more on teaser strategy.) Don't even get us started on three-league teasers: with the NBA's marquee match-ups on Christmas day, the number of options start to multiply exponentially. Of course, you're exposed to greater risk. Even a Push in any game is a loss.

Of course, if you see an otherwise live teaser bet headed south in the second game, you can always hedge at halftime . . . or if you're a high-risk, high-reward bettor, put your money on parlays like these. The books love parlays (especially with three teams or more) almost as much as Super Bowl prop bets because suckers tend to flush cash on longshots. But never mind that. Betting is easy! You just have to pick the right side!

As we go to press, The Birmingham Bowl (at Legion Field in you-know-where) has kicked with slight 'dog Texas Tech (+2) getting out to a strong start over South Florida. Bowls can be equalizers. Typically a team with a great record (9-2) like South Florida will look like a no-brainer over an opponent that squeaked in like Texas Tech (at 6-6). But examine those nine wins. Only one (versus Temple) came against a team with a winning record. Yuck.

Texas Tech enters the Birmingham with a mediocre record but plenty of experience against legit competition. The Red Raiders faced nine teams now in the postseason (albeit with only three wins) and finished 3-3 ATS and won twice outright when getting points. Look for similar incongruities as we progress through the remaining schedule of lesser-known bowl games leading up to the premier games and presumably better-paired match-ups.

The Lockheed Armed Forces Bowl
San Diego State Aztecs (-6.5) vs. Army Black Knights
Saturday, December 23, 2:30 p.m. ESPN (Amon G. Carter Stadium in Fort Worth, TX)

We've always liked the Aztecs but picking against the Cadets seems downright un-American. And if 2017 taught us anything, it's that Americanness is super important. We aren't worried because our ancestors were nursed by bald eagles and swaddled in Old Glory. But unless you were raised by Uncle Sam on a strict diet of apple pie and lulled to sleep each evening to "God Bless America," you had better take Army. Rumor has it that the NSA is monitoring online betting sites and SDSU backers should expect unwelcome Christmas guests asking pointed questions.

CFR pick: Whatever. San Diego State's offense fields a deadly ground attack featuring Rashaad Penny, the nation's leading runner with 2,027 yards, and a change-of-pace back most squads would love to have as a primary option: Juwan Washington gained 715 yards recording seven touchdowns. Go ahead, deport us. Go Aztecs!

The Chicken: SDSU by 8

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The Dollar General Bowl
Appalachian State Mountaineers (-6.5) vs. Toledo Rockets
Saturday, December 23, 6:30 p.m. ESPN (Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, AL)

As a region, Appalachia doesn't have much going for it. How can we not root for the upstart Mountaineers? ASU reached FBS status just four short years ago yet is going bowling for the third consecutive season including last year's Camilia Bowl, which featured this exact same match-up.

CFR pick: We like the Mountaineers to repeat and will lay the points.

The Chicken: Not a beast renowned for sentimentality or many other human emotions (other than orneriness) the Chicken likes Appalachian State too, by 13.

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The Hawai'i Bowl
Fresno State Bulldogs (-1.5) vs. Houston Cougars
Sunday, December 24, 7:30 p.m. ESPN (Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, HI)

Hard to believe either team will be too focused playing on a glorified vacation. Among the first items on the agenda for Wednesday, for example: a luau featuring a joint hula dance.


CFR pick: Let's make this fluffy occasion interesting shall we? We'll tease a pair underdogs to get the Cougars (Fresno is jinxed, with two losses in recent Hawaiian bowl games) up to +7.5 and the Seattle Seahawks way up (!) to +10.5 over the Dallas Cowboys.

The Chicken: Houston by 19

Merry Christmas. Apparently we're saying that again.

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Previously:

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 1. Keywords: AutoNation, Dreamstyle Remodeling, Las Vegas, Mountain Dew Mouth, North Texas Mean Green, Raycom, Troy Trojans.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 2. Executives at Cheribundi no doubt would have preferred a more competitive game. Having signed on as the bowl sponsor until 2019, Cheribundi needed the contest to attract at least some marginal attention to bolster the awareness of its tart cherry beverages nationwide.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 3. In this world of uncertainty, the Potato Bowl remains our rock.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:13 PM | Permalink

December 22, 2017

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 3

We missed it! Perhaps - although it's a tight race so awarding this honor could go to any number of contenders - the most ridiculously named bowl game went down on Wednesday. Temple trounced Florida International 28-3 in The Bad Boy Mowers Gasparilla Bowl in a game that went sideways in a hurry. Panthers stud senior signal-caller Alex McGough went down with a broken collarbone early, leaving FIU with an untested backup at quarterback. How is it that college coaches can't find a solution to this predicament? Quarterbacks go down like dominoes these days yet the victimized team rarely has a better plan than flinging a human clipboard to the wolves. In FIU's case, the sacrificial lamb was a second-year QB who had attempted all of six passes. We try to avoid trashing college players - making rare exceptions for the likes of Jameis Winston - so let's just say McGough's backup is a work in progress. Following the Bad Boy Bowl, Maurice Alexander's two-year career touchdown-to-interception ratio stands at 2-8 with two picks coming in the bowl game. Tough break (ayyooo) Panthers.

For the curious, the Gasparilla name honors Jose Gaspar, a mythical buccaneer of the late 18th- and early 19th-century who plundered the Gulf of Mexico and environs for 40 years, raiding dozens of vessels from his legendary pirate kingdom in Southeast Florida. Now that is a bowl backstory. No doubt Gaspar rolled over in his watery grave when a lawncare company won sponsorship rights to his namesake game. Perhaps Bad Boy Mowers however isn't the worst choice. Witness the history of the bowl's past incarnations:

  • magicJack St. Petersburg Bowl, 2008
  • Beef O'Brady's Bowl, 2009-2013
  • Bitcoin St. Petersburg Bowl, 2014
  • St. Petersburg Bowl, 2015-2016

Where were the sponsors in '15 and '16? What happened to Beef O'Brady's? Those were the days.

As we go to press, The Bahamas Bowl (featuring UAB vs. Ohio in . . . the Bahamas) is underway with another close behind:

The Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Central Michigan Chippewas vs. Wyoming Cowboys (-3)
Friday, December 22, 3 p.m. ESPN (Albertsons Stadium in New Orleans, LA)

In this world of uncertainty, the Potato Bowl remains our rock. The annual spudfest gives us a warm and comforting sensation, much like slipping into a bathtub of buttered mashed potatoes.

CFR pick: Wyoming QB Josh Allen plans to make a go of it despite coming off an injured shoulder. Kudos to Allen. As a projected first-round pick in April's NFL draft, many players in his position (as has increasingly become the norm) would sit out the game rather than risk further injury. Good on you, Josh. Even so, we still like the Chippewas catching a field goal.

The Chicken: CMU by 2

Up next: a three-game series on Saturday followed by a lone game on Sunday. Christmas Eve! What's the world coming to. Wait, what are we saying? Game on!

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Previously:

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 1. Keywords: AutoNation, Dreamstyle Remodeling, Las Vegas, Mountain Dew Mouth, North Texas Mean Green, Raycom, Troy Trojans.

* The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 2. Executives at Cheribundi no doubt would have preferred a more competitive game. Having signed on as the bowl sponsor until 2019, Cheribundi needed the contest to attract at least some marginal attention to bolster the awareness of its tart cherry beverages nationwide.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:56 PM | Permalink

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #180: Are The Bulls, Um, Good?

Is this really happening? Plus: Are The Blackhawks, Um, Good?; The Cubs Are Having An Interesting Offseason!; Can Loyola Ramble Into The Dance?; and The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview.


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SHOW NOTES

* 180.

* Wilbur Wood: "Wood was seriously injured in a game against the Detroit Tigers in Tiger Stadium, May 9, 1976, when Ron LeFlore, the Tigers' center fielder, hit a vicious line drive back toward the pitchers mound. The ball struck Wood's left knee forcibly, shattering his kneecap. He had surgery the next day, but the outlook was bleak. Many predicted that he would never pitch again, but after considerable rehabilitation, he did some pitching for two more seasons with the White Sox. However, he showed few signs of his former mastery. He retired in 1978, moving back to his native New England."

2:50: Are The Bulls Really Happening?

* The game has slowed down for Fred Hoiberg!

* Trading and tanking.

* Sometimes it's bad to be good.

13:43: Are The Blackhawks, Um, Good?

* Coffman: "Taking non-physical hockey to the next level!"

* Patrick Sharp-Brandon Saad reunion tour not working so far.

* Tommy Wingels:

23:30: The Cubs Are Having An Interesting Off-Season!

* The Machado Market.

* Watch, listen and read about how MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred lied to Dan Le Batard.

* Jesse Rogers: "Part of the thinking revolves around the Cubs' 23-year-old current starting shortstop. Dealing Russell now might be selling him at his peak value. There's no questioning Russell's ability, but he lost much of a season to off-field issues in 2017 and the injuries that are starting to pile up. He's had previous leg problems going back to before he was acquired from Oakland, and just last year he had a terrible case of plantar fasciitis, as well as a sore shoulder on more than one occasion."

* In on Darvish, not so much Arrieta.

* Gonzalez: "The rebirth of Jake Arrieta and the dramatic ascent of Kyle Hendricks masked a disturbing trend recently in the Cubs organization.

"Its long-standing inability to develop several high-round draft picks into major-league pitchers shared negative attention last season with the club's high-wire bullpen that struggled to throw strikes - especially in the playoffs.

"'We needed to do something better,' general manager Jed Hoyer said.

"The additions of new pitching coach Jim Hickey and special assistant Jim Benedict are designed to give the Cubs' big-league pitchers a fresh voice as well as a fresh look to help turn a struggling or underachieving prospect into at least a serviceable pitcher.

"'We have been open about the fact we need to do a better job with our evaluation and development of pitching, especially young pitching,' President Theo Epstein said. 'So finding the new voice or the right resource in the front office would be valuable to us.

"'(Benedict) probably has as good a track record as anyone taking pitchers who are down on their luck or a low point in their career and building their confidence back up and retooling their deliveries and arsenal and giving guys a second crack at a career,' Epstein said."

* Justin Wilson still has a chance.

* Taylor Davis is a Cub again!

1:02:15: Can Loyola Ramble Into The Dance?

* It just got tougher.

1:04:19: The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview

* Look for a new installment Friday afternoon!

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STOPPAGE: 7:06

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For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:01 PM | Permalink

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Constantine at Crown Liquors on Tuesday night.


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2. Monomania at the Empty Bottle on Thursday night.

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3. The Handcuffs at the Empty Bottle on Thursday night.

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4. Daisychain at Crown Liquors on Tuesday night.

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5. Todd Rundgren at the Park West on Sunday night.

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Catching up with . . .

Wax Fang at the Empty Bottle on December 6th.

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Cryptopsy at the Forge in Joliet on December 3rd.

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Belphegor at the Forge in Joliet on December 3rd.

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Jimmy Degenerate & the NotSeez at the Red Line Tap on December 15th.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:30 AM | Permalink

The [Friday] Papers

"Chicago was once a major destination for African-Americans during the Great Migration, but experts say today the city is pushing out poor black families. In less than two decades, Chicago lost one-quarter of its black population, or more than 250,000 people," Kalyn Belsha reports for the Chicago Reporter.

250,000 people.

That's just about the population of Buffalo.

If those 250,000 people formed their own city, it would be the 83rd largest in the United States.

That's a lot of people, and the city hasn't really reckoned with it - other than to close schools instead of investing in those folks' neighborhoods to make them more appealing. (I suspect the foreclosure crisis/scandal has a lot to do with it too, which just goes to show how incredibly weak both local and federal responses to it have been.)

*

"In the past decade, Chicago's public schools lost more than 52,000 black students."

52,000.

If those 52,000 students formed a city, it would be bigger than DeKalb, and just about the size of Tinley Park or Des Plaines.

That's a lot of kids.

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Where are they going? Don't say Atlanta!

"A common refrain is that Chicago's black families are 'reverse migrating' to Southern cities with greater opportunities, like Atlanta and Dallas. But many of the families fleeing the poorest pockets of Chicago venture no farther than the south suburbs or Northwest Indiana. And their children end up in cash-strapped segregated schools like the ones they left behind, a Chicago Reporter investigation found."

Just like - or including - the dispersion of former Chicago public housing residents whose buildings no longer exist.

*

"About 15,000 students from the city's predominantly poor and African-American schools transferred out of CPS over the past eight academic years, yet remained in Illinois, according to an examination of tens of thousands of state transfer records. About one-third enrolled in school districts that are both majority poor and majority black.

15,000.

"Often, the receiving school districts in Illinois and Northwest Indiana were chronically underfunded. Research shows poor black students in Illinois perform worse academically in such districts compared with Chicago."

*

There's nothing accidental or organic about it. The mass outbound movement is part and parcel of policy decisions made by political leaders.

A spokeswoman for Mayor Rahm Emanuel said his administration is taking steps to keep African-Americans in the city. "Mayor Emanuel has led several major initiatives to invest in our youth, support local businesses and create jobs in neighborhoods across the city," Lauren Markowitz said in a statement. She pointed to expanded mentoring and jobs for African-American youth and investments in businesses and shopping corridors on the predominantly black South and West sides.

But some academics blame city officials for making it harder for poor African-Americans, in particular, to live in Chicago: They closed neighborhood schools and mental health clinics; failed to rebuild public housing, dispersing thousands of poor black families across the region, and inadequately responded to gun violence, unemployment and foreclosures in black communities.

"It's a menu of disinvestment," says Elizabeth Todd-Breland, who teaches African-American history at the University of Illinois-Chicago. "The message that public policy sends to black families in the city is that we're not going to take care of you and if you just keep going away, that's OK."

There's a lot more, go read the whole thing.

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New on the Beachwood today . . .

2018 Inspector General Preview!
Has the City implemented the recommendations made by the Mayor's Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Reform Task Force? Does the Chicago Police Department manage and maintain dashboard cameras and footage effectively? And more!

*

The Week In Chicago Rock
Is in pre-production.

*

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 3
In this world of uncertainty, the Potato Bowl remains our rock.

*

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #180: Are The Bulls, Um, Good?
Is this really happening? Plus: Are The Blackhawks, Um, Good?; The Cubs Are Having An Interesting Offseason!; Can Loyola Ramble Into The Dance?; and The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview.

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The Media Mindset

Is there a more hypocritical profession?

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ChicagoGram

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ChicagoTube

The Chicago Paintball Open.

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BeachBook

Flashback: The Media & Laquan McDonald.

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Flashback: Rahm Releases E-Mails He Denied Existed, From Account Tribune Editor Used.

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The Truth About Multilevel Marketing Earnings. (See also Uber.)

*

How America Moves Homeless People Around The Country To No Good End.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Sankey in, sankey out.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:49 AM | Permalink

2018 Preview: Chicago's Office Of Inspector General!

The City of Chicago Office of Inspector General Audit and Program Review section has published its 2018 Audit Plan. APR supports the OIG mission by conducting independent, objective performance analysis and evaluation of municipal programs and operations, issuing public reports of findings and making recommendations to strengthen and improve the delivery of public services.

In addition to summarizing work completed in 2017 and work currently in progress, the 2018 APR Audit Plan identifies 23 new audit topics to initiate in the coming year, which will answer the following questions, among others:

  • Has the City implemented the recommendations made by the Mayor's Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Reform Task Force?
  • Does the Chicago Police Department manage and maintain dashboard cameras and footage effectively?

  • Do the Department of Buildings, the Department of Planning and Development and the Chicago Police Department collaborate effectively to achieve their respective goals for the Troubled Buildings Initiative?
  • Does the Chicago Department of Transportation's maintenance program ensure that traffic signals remain in good working order?
  • Does the Department of Streets and Sanitation set street sweeping routes to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of street sweeping citywide?
  • Does the City adequately promote and facilitate coordination between the Chicago Police Department and the Department of Family and Support Services, as well as between City departments and external stakeholders, to ensure the full functionality of the Juvenile Intervention Support Center?

APR's role is separate from, but complements, the work performed by the OIG Investigations and Public Safety (police oversight) sections. While Investigations primarily examines allegations of individual misconduct or wrongdoing, APR focuses on the effectiveness and efficiency of programs and processes.

APR is also distinct from the Hiring Oversight section, which performs legally mandated reviews of the City's hiring and employment practices to ensure compliance with the City's various hiring plans.

The 2018 APR Audit Plan can be found on OIG's website: http://bit.ly/2018APRAuditPlan. If you have any comments or suggestions related to the topics in the Audit Plan, please contact us at (866) 448-4754 or via our website.

Follow OIG on Twitter @ChicagoOIG for the latest information on how OIG continues to fight waste, fraud, abuse and inefficiency in Chicago government.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:07 AM | Permalink

December 21, 2017

The [Thursday] Papers

"Mass surveillance society subjects us all to its gaze, but not equally so. Its power touches everyone, but its hand is heaviest in communities already disadvantaged by their poverty, race, religion, ethnicity, and immigration status. Technology and stealth allow government watchers to remain unobtrusive when they wish to be so, but their blunter tools - stop-and-frisk, suspicionless search, recruitment of snitches, compulsory questioning on intimate subjects - are conspicuous in the lives of those least empowered to object," Barton Gellman and Sam Adler-Bell write for The Century Foundation.

To wit:

Public and subsidized housing, no less than welfare, have historically been Fourth Amendment exclusion zones. In the early 1990s, as part of a self-described campaign against violent drug crime, police in Chicago, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and elsewhere commenced impromptu, warrantless raids of public housing complexes. Chicago's "Operation Clean Sweep" involved twelve steps, including "securing perimeter of building by placing police at all entrances and exits," "notifying the press that a sweep is under way," "inspecting each unit," and "enclosing the lobby to control access." Many Chicago housing residents had grown weary of gang violence; they welcomed the raids. Others felt their rights were under assault. In 1994, a federal court deemed "Clean Sweep" unconstitutional on Fourth Amendment grounds. Judge Wayne Anderson acknowledged in his ruling, "Many tenants within CHA housing, apparently convinced by sad experience that the larger community will not provide normal law enforcement services to them, are prepared to forgo their own constitutional rights." He was unwilling to permit the government to "suspend their neighbor's rights as well."

From the Reader in 1990:

"Operation Clean Sweep, the CHA's ballyhooed security program, did chase the gangbangers and drug dealers from the Prairie Courts high rise. But it also robbed innocent tenants of their freedom and dignity, and now it threatens to evict them from their homes."

From the New York Times in 1989:

"The crackdown, 'Operation Clean Sweep,' has won praise from Jack F. Kemp, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, who has urged housing officials in other cities to view the Chicago move as 'a model for the rest of the country.'''

From the Chicago Tribune in 1988:

"Street gangs and drug dealers could not stop the Chicago Housing Authority`s security crackdown. Now the American Civil Liberties Union is giving it a try. Here`s hoping the ACLU fails."

See also: Clean Sweep Or Witch Hunt?

*

Back to the current-day Century Foundation Report:

"As we have tried to demonstrate, arbitrary government intrusions in the terrains of East New York or Chicago's West Side are routinely accompanied by humiliation, physical force, the risk of a lethal encounter, or crushing financial pressure . . .

"In Chicago, police have also mined Facebook and other social networks to identify individuals they judge to be at high risk of committing or becoming victims of gun violence.

"Even if these correlations sometimes prove out, the concentration of law enforcement power in 'at risk' communities will reinforce the poisonous effects of historic biases. It aims to preempt bad acts by a small minority by subjecting all residents to aggressive law enforcement intrusions on the basis of their associations, demographics, and geography.

"Policy makers should give careful thought to that punitive impact on the blameless majority, which is exactly akin to the central grievance of the colonists against King George. As noted above, New York's experiment with stop and frisk discovered firearms in 1.5 percent of its searches, many or most never used in a crime, at the cost of millions of searches that made up the other 98.5 percent.

"There is considerable risk that machine learning techniques, when applied to a statistical record of unequal policing, will reproduce that bias in the guise of neutral science. Prejudice embedded in computer code will be an exceptionally difficult question for lay policy makers to judge."

See also, from ProPublica: "Machine Bias: There's software used across the country to predict future criminals. And it's biased against blacks."

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New on the Beachwood today . . .

The Real Story Behind Katharine Graham And The Post
"The Washington Post was instrumental in avidly promoting the lies that made the Vietnam War possible in the first place."

*

Life After Workplace Injury
"While workplace injury expenses are an employer's legal responsibility, nearly half of surveyed injured Chicago workers had to pay their own bills (41%) or use their own health insurance (8%) to cover injury medical expenses. Workers' compensation insurance paid all or part of medical expenses for only 3% of the injured workers surveyed."

*

Can Weed Save Football?
Former New Orleans Sainst All-Pro Kyle Turley says pot saved his life - and could save the game.

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ChicagoGram

I actually haven't posted this on the 'gram yet. But here it is anyway.

Hamms.jpg

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ChicagoTube

The Magician and the Dragon - Epic Battle In Chicago.

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BeachBook

Chicago Refugee Resettlement Program Closing.

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Me, a year ago: "Building a new high school in Englewood is really a way to close high schools in Englewood."

*

Remembering Our Exclusive Look Inside Chi-Town Rising.

*

What If We Talked Like TV Reporters All The Time?

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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*

*

*

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The Beachwood Tip Line: Emporium.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:19 PM | Permalink

Can Weed Save Football?

"In this 3-part series, Kyle Turley takes us on his journey to to deal with the damaging effects of football through the use of marijuana. After an NFL career that saw him take home All-Pro honors, Turley was diagnosed with pre-CTE. After taking a laundry list of pharmaceutical drugs in order to deal with the associated issues, Kyle found marijuana to be the best available treatment for the problems that he was facing. In this episode, we meet Kyle and see the beginning of his journey.​"

1. Chasing Strains.


*

2. Would I Do It Again? In A Heartbeat.

*

3. Guys Are Ready To Explore.

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See also:
* Sports Illustrated: Turley: Marijuana Saved My Life.

* CBS Sports Radio: Turley: Marijuana Has Changed My Life For The Better.

* Kyle Turley's Wikipedia page.

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Previously:
* Bob Probert's Broken Brain.

* NFL Players Killing Themselves Because They Miss Football So Much.

* The College Football Report: Dementia Pugilistica.

* Blackhawks Playing Head Games.

* Jay Cutler Should Consider Retiring.

* Dislike: Friday Night Tykes.

* Hurt And Be Hurt: The Lessons Of Youth Sports.

* Chicago Soccer Player Patrick Grange Had CTE.

* Sony Softened Concussion To Placate NFL.

* Ultra-Realistic Madden To Simulate Game's Debilitating Concussions.

* Dear Football: I'm Breaking Up With You.

* Dead College Football Player's Brain Leaves Clues Of Concussions' Toll On Brain.

* More Bad Concussion News For Young Football Players.

* NFL Tried To Fix Concussion Study.

* The Week In Concussions: Another Enforcer Down.

* Teen Concussion Rate Rising Significantly.

* Conflict Of Interest For NFL Doctors To Report To Teams: Harvard Study.

* U.S. Supreme Court Ends Fight Over $1 Billion NFL Concussion Deal.

* U.S. High School Soccer Concussions On The Rise.

* Youth Football Finally Listening To Coach Coffman.

* Many Kids Still Don't Report Concussion Symptoms. How Can We Change That?

* Brain Damage In Former Players Fuels Soccer 'Heading' Fears.

* Canadian Youth Hockey Injuries Cut In Half After National Policy Change.

* More Teen Knowledge About Concussion May Not Increase Reporting.

* High School Boys Fear Looking 'Weak' If They Report Concussions.

* Pro Flag Football Is Now A Thing - Starring Former NFL Players!

* Nearly All Donated NFL Brains Found To Have CTE.

* Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions.

* Whoa. Perhaps The Smartest Player In NFL History - He's In Math PhD Program At MIT - Assesses Situation And Decides To Save His Brain.

* Study: CTE Affects Football Players At All Levels.

* Dan Jiggetts Is Right About CTE.

* Letting Our Boys Onto The Football Field Is A Losing Play.

* Tackle Rings?

* CTE Season Preview.

* The CTE Diaries: The Life And Death Of A High School Football Player Killed By Concussions.

* Study: Youth Football Linked To Adult Problems.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 3:35 AM | Permalink

The Real Story Behind Katharine Graham And The Post

Movie critics are already hailing The Post, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Meryl Streep as Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham. Millions of people will see the film in early winter. But the real-life political story of Graham and her newspaper is not a narrative that's headed to the multiplexes.

The Post comes 20 years after Graham's autobiography Personal History appeared and won enormous praise - including the Pulitzer Prize. Read as a memoir, the book is a poignant account of Graham's long quest to overcome sexism, learn the newspaper business and gain self-esteem. Read as media history, however, it is deceptive.

screen_shot_2017-12-20_at_9.11.19_am.jpg"To Graham, men like McNamara and Kissinger - the main war architects for Presidents Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon - were wonderful human beings."

"I don't believe that whom I was or wasn't friends with interfered with our reporting at any of our publications," Graham wrote. However, Robert Parry - who was a Washington correspondent for Newsweek during the last three years of the 1980s - has shed some light on the shadows of Graham's reassuring prose. Contrary to the claims in her book, Parry said he witnessed "self-censorship because of the coziness between Post-Newsweek executives and senior national security figures."

Among Parry's examples: "On one occasion in 1987, I was told that my story about the CIA funneling anti-Sandinista money through Nicaragua's Catholic Church had been watered down because the story needed to be run past Mrs. Graham, and Henry Kissinger was her house guest that weekend. Apparently, there was fear among the top editors that the story as written might cause some consternation." (The 1996 memoir of former CIA Director Robert Gates confirmed that Parry had the story right all along.)

Graham's book exudes affection for Kissinger as well as Robert McNamara and other luminaries of various administrations who remained her close friends until she died in 2001. To Graham, men like McNamara and Kissinger - the main war architects for Presidents Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon - were wonderful human beings.

In sharp contrast, Graham devoted dozens of righteous pages to vilifying Post press operators who went on strike in 1975. She stressed the damage done to printing equipment as the walkout began and "the unforgivable acts of violence throughout the strike." It is a profound commentary on her outlook that thuggish deeds by a few of the strikers were "unforgivable" - but men like McNamara and Kissinger were lovable even after they oversaw horrendous slaughter in Southeast Asia.

Graham's autobiography portrays union stalwarts as mostly ruffians or dupes. "Only a handful of [Newspaper Guild] members had gone out for reasons I respected," she told readers. "One was John Hanrahan, a good reporter and a nice man who came from a longtime labor family and simply couldn't cross a picket line. He never did come back. Living your beliefs is a rare virtue and greatly to be admired."

But for Hanrahan (whose Republican parents actually never belonged to a union) the admiration was far from mutual. As he put it, "The Washington Post under Katharine Graham pioneered the union-busting 'replacement worker' strategy that Ronald Reagan subsequently used against the air-traffic controllers and that Corporate America - in the Caterpillar, Bridgestone/Firestone and other strikes - used to throw thousands of workers out of their jobs in the 1980s and the '90s."

The Washington Post deserves credit for publishing sections of the Pentagon Papers immediately after a federal court injunction in mid-June 1971 stopped the New York Times from continuing to print excerpts from the secret document. That's the high point of the Washington Post's record in relation to the Vietnam War. The newspaper strongly supported the war for many years.

Yet Graham's book avoids any semblance of introspection about the Vietnam War and the human costs of the Post's support for it. Her book recounts that she huddled with a writer in line to take charge of the editorial page in August 1966: "We agreed that the Post ought to work its way out of the very supportive editorial position it had taken, but we couldn't be precipitous; we had to move away gradually from where we had been." Vast carnage resulted from such unwillingness to be "precipitous."

Although widely touted as a feminist parable, Graham's beloved autobiography is notably bereft of solidarity for women without affluence or white skin. They barely seemed to exist in her range of vision; painful realities of class and racial biases were dim, faraway specks. Overall the 625-page book gives short shrift to the unrich and unfamous, whose lives are peripheral to the drama played out by the wealthy publisher's dazzling peers. The name of Martin Luther King Jr. does not appear in her star-studded, history-drenched book.

Katharine Graham's decision to publish the Pentagon Papers was indeed laudable, helping to expose lies that had greased the wheels of the war machinery with such horrific consequences in Vietnam. But the Washington Post was instrumental in avidly promoting the lies that made the Vietnam War possible in the first place. No amount of rave reviews or Oscar nominations for The Post will change that awful truth.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 3:12 AM | Permalink

Life After Workplace Injury

Maria Escutia, 36, of Park City, Illinois, could not get out of bed to care for her two children after being injured on the job. Two years after her workplace injury, her back pain was so severe she was not able to sleep through the night. The pain pulsed and burned all day long and traveled down her leg, causing tingling and frequent numbness. "Every day I was in pain and more irritable. It made it difficult to do everyday things - like helping my kids with their homework. It was endlessly frustrating. My family suffered the consequences of my workplace injury, but my employer didn't."

Escutia was a supervisor at a fast food chain for more than 15 years and never thought she would get hurt on the job. Once she reported the injury to her supervisors, the insurance company tried to deny her claim by alleging the injury did not occur in the workplace.

Sadly, Escutia's experience is not unique. As James Ellenberger notes in a 2012 report, "Introduced as a no-fault program to provide medical benefits and wage replacement in the place of the uncertainty of tort recovery, workers' comp has seen massive efforts to shift both the blame and the burden of workplace injuries and illnesses to the backs of workers."

Cuerpos-rotos-194x300.png

Says Escuita: "I was so afraid! I knew from my co-workers that employees had been injured at other locations before and the company looked for any pretext or excuse to fire them."

Practices like these make it likely that workers, particularly low-wage, immigrant workers, are less likely to report an injury once it occurs. According to a U.S. House Committee on Education and Labor report from 2008, "As much as 69 percent of injuries and illnesses may never make it into the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses." The report goes on to note that many workers fear retaliation or intimidation for reporting and injury to their employer.

In a 2010 UIC study of low-wage workers in Chicago, researchers found similarly low reporting rates. Of the workers surveyed who experienced a serious workplace injury, only 9% filed a workers' comp claim. When workers told their employer about an injury, 20% experienced an illegal employer reaction. While workplace injury expenses are an employer's legal responsibility, nearly half of surveyed injured workers had to pay their own bills (41%) or use their own health insurance (8%) to cover injury medical expenses. Workers' compensation insurance paid all or part of medical expenses for only 3% of the injured workers surveyed.

Despite this rampant underreporting, data show that workplace hazards are present in all industries and cause thousands of injuries every year, ranging from minor burns, cuts, or fractures to lifelong major disabilities and even death. However, certain industries are more dangerous, and some workers are more likely to be injured.

Temporary workers are much more likely to become injured on the job, with incidence rates between 36 percent and 72 percent higher than other industries. Latino workers had the highest rate of fatal workplace incidents than any other racial group.

Honoria Pimentel went to a temp agency to find work in 2015. She was placed in a factory and was not properly trained on how to operate the machine at her station, nor provided adequate protective gear. Within the first few days of work, she injured her ankle. She reported it to the site supervisor and was referred to company clinic for an assessment, where they instructed her to remain out of work for a few days. When she returned, she was assigned to a new area that was severely understaffed. She performed the work of two workers alone and, once again, without proper training. She was injured for the second time in one week and has been in recovery ever since.

Her employer's workers' compensation insurance company spent years denying her claims. Pimentel sadly notes, "Employers treat you like you are disposable. If a machine is damaged they fix it quickly, but what they do with a human is replace you with another person."

Pimentel recently underwent a surgery and continues physical therapy exercises, but still suffers from constant pain and is unable to return to work. "What else?" Pimentel says. "All we have left is to continue living with the pain."

The outlook for workers like Escutia and Pimentel is grim: Recent studies show that workers who are injured on the job have long-term income losses even after they have recovered, and face increased mortality over the course of their lifetime. Qualitative data highlight the extreme effects workplace injuries have on an injured workers' physical health, mental health, economic health, and family well-being.

Workers like Escutia and Pimentel, who struggle with ongoing pain and long-term impacts, exemplify these findings. Yet they also decided to take action to prevent other workers from being victimized by dehumanizing workplace practices. As Escutia notes, "My motivation in all this nightmare is my children and my parents; they are my engine and my light to continue trying hard."

Workers like Escutia and Pimentel are increasingly seeking support from local worker centers to learn their rights and to connect with others struggling through the workers' comp process. Escutia notes, "When I arrived [at Arise Chicago], my eyes were covered because the only thing I knew was what my boss wanted me to know. Now I feel more confident knowing my rights."

Due to an observed trend in injured workers reporting additional non-physical long-term impacts, Arise Chicago launched a pilot project for injured workers. "We wanted to know, why is it that if you are injured at work, you are doomed to face long-term problems - from your physical health, to your mental health and well-being, and long-term economic challenges?" says Carolyn Morales, an organizer for Arise Chicago. "Why does a workplace injury lead to complete turmoil for so many workers? We created an Injured Workers Group to explore these questions, learn from workers' experiences, and based on their recommendations, work to improve the system for other workers."

Broken-Bodies--193x300.png

After meeting over the course of many weeks, workers published a booklet of their reflections in the hope that others can learn from their experiences and that their stories will lead to safer, more humane working conditions for all workers.

Debbie Berkowitz, a senior fellow at the National Employment Law Project, writes in a recent report, "The evidence is clear that safety pays: safe workplaces save employers money, prevent injuries, and contribute to a more robust economy. It is estimated that workplace injuries cost the economy more than $198 billion annually. Yet, study after study clearly show that when employers provide safe equipment and implement basic safety measures, they save money."

It is time for employers and regulatory agencies to take the physical safety of workers' bodies seriously. Because the impacts of workplace injuries are severe, comprehensive, and long-lasting, safe workplaces not only protect individual bodies, they also leads to greater well-being for entire families and communities.

"Now I understand that the most important thing is my health, my body," Escuita says. "There are many jobs, but I only have one body and I have to take care of it." Like all workers who suffer a workplace injury, Escutia values her physical health and safety. It's time for employers to do so as well.

-

Previously in workers' comp:

* How To Investigate Workers' Comp In Your State.

* Injured Worker In ProPublica/NPR Story Testifies Before Illinois Legislature.

* State Legislators To Investigate Workers' Comp Opt Out.

* Tyson Foods' Secret Recipe For Carving Up Workers' Comp.

* The Workers' Comp Industrial Complex Parties Hearty.

* Corporate Campaign To Ditch Workers' Comp Stalls.

* U.S. Labor Department: States Are Failing Injured Workers.

-

Previously from Arise Chicago:

* After Receiving Only Tips For Years And Losing Thumb At Work Accident, Latino Car Wash Worker Demands Back Wages.

* The Patisserie Protest.

* Item: Clean Cars, Dirty Work: Worker Rights Violations In Chicago Car Washes.

* Riviera Stagehands To "Trick-or-Treat" For Union Contract At JAM Productions.

* Low-Wage Immigrant Women Call Out Workplace Sexual Harassment.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:09 AM | Permalink

December 20, 2017

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 2

For those of you who may have missed the opening weekend of the 2017 college football bowl season, a total of 10 teams played in five games. Five of those teams emerged victorious. Five did not. Another game took place on Tuesday. More games follow. You may not have been aware of this. That's where The College Football Report comes in.

First, a recap of The Cheribundi Tart Cherry Boca Raton Bowl
Akron Zips 3 vs. Florida Atlantic Owls 50 (at FAU Football Stadium in Boca Raton, FL)

That final tally isn't a typo: the match was anything but competitive. After a brief sign of life in the first quarter culminated in a missed chip shot from the Owl's 21, the Zips faded fast and trailed for the remainder. Even the hefty 22-point spread wasn't in doubt for long. The close of the first quarter said it all. With the quarter winding down to a scoreless tie, FAU drove the ball to a first-and-goal. Three missed opportunities later saw Florida Atlantic coach Lane Kiffin (yes, that Lane Kiffin) stomping the sidelines in open frustration. His team reached the postseason on a 10-game win streak including victories by a least a two-touchdown margin in all but one (a five-point W over Marshall) game during that stretch. On Tuesday, viewers were treated to Lane Kiffin Face following a dud draw play on third-and-goal. Kiffin doesn't take failure with grace (nor is he a fan of sportsmanship, as the score suggests) and anything short of a touchdown was unacceptable. A hurry-up snap and toss to the endzone on 4th-and-goal and, bingo, Owls 7, Zips zip and the rout was on.

Executives at Cheribundi no doubt would have preferred a more competitive game. Having signed on as the bowl sponsor until 2019, Cheribundi needed the contest to attract at least some marginal attention to bolster the awareness of its tart cherry beverages nationwide. Rightly so. We could all stand to benefit from learning more about this magical beverage. For example, Cheribundi Tart Cherry Juice has "the highest ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) capacity" among the other 32 (unnamed) "healthy beverages," with an ORAC unit measurement 1.4 times higher than the next highest juice. Any beverage that can be measured in Radicalness must be pretty awesome.

The tart (aka sour, aka dwarf) cherry is the lesser-known cousin of the sweet cherries we all enjoy but refuse to buy for $9.99 per pound. Tart cherries are used worldwide in desserts and other dishes. However the only product containing tart cherry juice you may recognize is Lindeman Kriek Lambic, the bastard offspring of Belgian beer and cough syrup. That stuff is disgusting. A bit like Malört, Lindeman's clings to a sliver of misguided souls who believe paying a premium for rank booze (fizzy and pink in this case) signifies something other than utter foolishness. Lindeman's is like carbonated anti-Pedialyte: it tastes terrible and leaves you dehydrated and hung over.

Onward!

The Inaugural DXL Frisco Bowl
Southern Methodist Mustangs (-4) vs. Louisiana Tech Bulldogs
Wednesday, December 20, 7 p.m. ESPN (Toyota Stadium in Frisco, TX)

Back in April, the American Athletic Conference sold the rights to the (now defunct) Miami Beach Bowl to ESPN. Ignoring the three-year history of the venerable bowl, The Worldwide Leader picked up stakes and packed for Frisco, TX. The name is misleading: Frisco isn't so much a standalone town as a far flung burb of the Dallas-Fort Worth megaplex. In addition to other notable attractions, such as a pretty sweet mall and an Ikea, the National Videogame Museum also calls Frisco home. (Readers in Texas take note: the NVM now offers three college scholarships to locals. Other criteria and qualifications are as yet unknown.) We feel the hours invested years ago in Super Dodgeball, Coach K College Basketball, and Super Mario 3, should make us eligible for exception to the residency requirement should we decide to reboot (ho ho!) college.

CFR pick: Over 71 (now up to 71.5 at some books) in what figures to be a high-scoring affair.

The Chicken: Mustangs by 25

Up next: More football games.

-

Previously: The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Preview Part 1.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 3:44 PM | Permalink

The [Wednesday] Papers

Today in The Paradise Papers: Nevis Is An Offshore Haven Of Opportunity.

Dear Steve,

Today we're releasing more data from the Paradise Papers. We're adding more than 160,000 entities to our Offshore Leaks Database from four Caribbean jurisdictions.

We also dive into a story about Kurt Donsbach - a doctor with a history of practicing medicine without a license. He reconfigured a trust in Nevis and moved assets, after being sentenced, which is not surprising given the island's asset-protection laws.

There is also an update about our UK partners, the Guardian and the BBC, which reported that Appleby - the law firm at the center of The Paradise Papers - is pursuing a legal case against them for their reporting. Our director, Gerard Ryle, called this a "dangerous moment for free expression."

Until next time!

Amy Wilson-Chapman
ICIJ's Community Engagement Editor

P.S. We've also just made it easier for you to financially support ICIJ. In four easy steps you can organize a fundraiser for us.

Of course, now the United States is its own tax haven - well, even more than it already was - for corporations and the ultra-rich.

-

Previously in tax scammage:
* Deepwater Horizon Settlement Comes With $5.35 Billion Tax Windfall.

* Offshoring By 29 Companies Costs Illinois $1.2 Billion Annually.

* Government Agencies Allow Corporations To Write Off Billions In Federal Settlements.

* The Gang Of 62 Vs. The World.

* How The Maker Of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing.

* $1.4 Trillion: Oxfam Exposes The Great Offshore Tax Scam Of U.S. Companies.

* How Barclay's Turned A $10 Billion Profit Into A Tax Loss.

* Wall Street Stock Loans Drain $1 Billion A Year From German Taxpayers.

* German Finance Minister Cries Foul Over Tax Avoidance Deals.

* Prosecutor Targets Commerzbank For Deals That Dodge German Taxes.

* A Schlupfloch Here, A Schlupfloch There. Now It's Real Money.

* How Milwaukee Landlords Avoid Taxes.

* Study: 32 Illinois Fortune 500 Companies Holding At Least $147 Billion Offshore.

* Watch Out For The Coming Tax Break Trickery.

* When A 'Tax Bonanza' Is Actually A Huge Corporate Tax Break.

* The Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump.

* Oxfam Names World's Worst Tax Havens Fueling 'Global Race To Bottom.'

* Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Illinois Small Business $5,789 A Year.

* State Tax Incentives To Corporations Don't Work.

* GOP Tax Plan Would Give 15 Of America's Largest Corporations A $236 Billion Tax Cut.

* Triumph Of The Oligarchs.

-

Previously in carried interest, aka The Billionaire's Loophole:
* Patriotic Millionaires Vs. Carried Interest.

* The Somewhat Surreal Politics Of A Private Equity Tax Loophole Costing Us Billions (That Obama Refused To Close Despite Pledging To Do So).

* Fact-Checking Trump & Clinton On The Billionaire's Tax Break.

* Despite Trump Campaign Promise, Billionaires' Tax Loophole Survives Again.

* Carried Interest Reform Is a Sham.

-

Previously in The Paradise Papers:
* 'Paradise Papers' Reveal Tax Avoidance, Shady Dealings Of World's Rich And Powerful.

* Just How Much Money Is Held Offshore? Hint: A SHIT-TON.

* Development Dreams Lost In The Offshore World.

* Keeping Offshore 'Hush Hush,' But Why?

* Tax Havens Are Alive With The Sound Of Music.

* Today In Tax Avoidance Of The Ultra-Wealthy.

* Go To Town With This Offshore Leaks Database.

* The Paradise Papers: The View From Africa And Asia.

* The Paradise Papers: The End Of Elusion For PokerStars.

* The Paradise Papers: An Odd Call From The Bermuda Government.

-

Previously in The Panama Papers:
* The Panama Papers: Remarkable Global Media Collaboration Cracks Walls Of Offshore Tax Haven Secrecy.

* The Panama Papers: Prosecutors Open Probes.

* The [Monday] Papers.

* Adventures In Tax Avoidance.

* Mossack Fonseca's Oligarchs, Dictators And Corrupt White-Collar Businessmen.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! They're All In It Together.

* Meet The Panama Papers Editor Who Handled 376 Reporters In 80 Countries.

-

New on the Beachwood today . . .

Triumph Of The Oligarchs
"Most Americans know that the tax plan is payback for major Republican donors. Gary Cohn, Trump's lead economic advisor, even conceded in an interview that 'the most excited group out there are big CEOs, about our tax plan.' Republican Rep. Chris Collins admitted 'my donors are basically saying, Get it done or don't ever call me again.' Senator Lindsey Graham warned that if Republicans failed to pass the tax plan, 'the financial contributions will stop.'"

*

The Real Jonathan Pie
Meet Tom Walker, accidental satirist who gives us a glimpse of how the news should be delivered.

-

ChicagoGram

-

ChicagoTube

Great Falls International Adds Direct Flight To Chicago; Local TV News Reports Featuring Cubs Gear.

-

BeachBook

The Rise Of America's Secret Wars.

*

University Enrollment Decline Continues Into Sixth Straight Year.

*

The Kushner's NYC Buildings Are Mostly Owned By Others.

*

Lizard Squad Hacker Admits To Conspiracy Targeting Thousands.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

*

And now that inheritance isn't even taxed!

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Grog.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:12 AM | Permalink

The Real Jonathan Pie

Meet Tom Walker, accidental political (and media) satirist.


*

Inspired by this Peter Sissons clip:

*

"[Pie] was supposed to be a comic character . . . but the politics are what grabbed people's attention."

The media satire is also what works for some people.

*

"Pie [a socialist] is frustrated with the left, he's frustrated with their tactics, and he keeps trying to explain why they keep losing, and it's because they think they have the moral high ground."

*

"He is like me, he's an exaggeration of my politics, but I'm really frustrated with the left."

*

On Facebook.

On Twitter.

JonathanPie.com.

Wikipedia page.

-

Previously in Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter!:

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Explains The Economy.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! It's Shit Crap News, Tim.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Is Going To Paris.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Grow Some Balls; Tell The Truth.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! MP Is A Wanker Santa.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Merry Fucking Christmas.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! New Year's Rant.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Sexy Skype.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! TTIP Is Boring Shit.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Truth About Teachers & Doctors.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Valentine's Day 2016.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! On The 'Environment" Beat.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Political Theater As News.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Charter Wankers International.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Panama Papers: They're All In It Together.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Answer The Fucking Question.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Snapchatting The Environment.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Election Fever!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Day-Glo Fuck-Nugget Trump.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Dickens Meets The Jetsons.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Tony Blair: Comedy Genius Or Psychopath?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! What Real Business News Should Look Like.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Facts Are No Longer Newsworthy.

* Pie's Brexit.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Real Life Is Not Game Of Thrones.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Labor: The Clue's In The Title!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Pie Olympics.

* Occupy Pie.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Where Is The War Against Terrorble Mental Health Services?

* Progressive Pie.

* The BBC's Bake-Off Bollocks.

* Pie Commits A Hate Crime.

* Pie Interviews A Teenage Conservative.

* Jonathan Pie's Idiot's Guide To The U.S. Election.

* President Trump: How & Why.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! All The News Is Fake!

* Happy Christmas From Jonathan Pie.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! 2016 In Review.

* Inauguration Reporting.

* New Year: New Pie?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Make The Air Fair.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! A Gift To Trump?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Strong And Unstable.

* Pie & Brand: Hate, Anger, Violence & Carrying On.

* Socialism Strikes Back!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Election Carnage.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Papering Over Poverty.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Queen's Speech.

* Showdown: North Korea vs. Trump.

* Time For The Royal Scroungers To Earn Their Keep.

* Cricket vs. Brexit.

-

Plus:

If Only All TV Reporters Did The News Like This.

-

And:

Australia Is Horrific.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:34 AM | Permalink

December 19, 2017

Triumph Of The Oligarchs

The Republican tax plan to be voted on this week is likely to pass. "The American people have waited 31 long years to see our broken tax code overhauled," the leaders of the Koch's political network insisted in a letter to members of Congress, urging swift approval.

They added that the time had come to put "more money in the pockets of American families."

Please. The Koch network doesn't care a fig about the pockets of American families. It cares about the pockets of the Koch network.

It has poured money into almost every state in an effort to convince Americans that the tax cut will be good for them. Yet most Americans don't believe it.

Polls shows only about a third of Americans favor the tax plan. The vast majority feel it's heavily skewed to the rich and big businesses - which it is.

In counties that Trump won but Obama carried in 2012, only 17 percent say they expect to pay less in taxes, according to a recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. Another 25 percent say they expected their family would actually pay higher taxes.

Most Americans know that the tax plan is payback for major Republican donors. Gary Cohn, Trump's lead economic advisor, even conceded in an interview that "the most excited group out there are big CEOs, about our tax plan."

Republican Rep. Chris Collins admitted "my donors are basically saying, 'Get it done or don't ever call me again.'"

Senator Lindsey Graham warned that if Republicans failed to pass the tax plan, "the financial contributions will stop."

By passing it, Republican donors will save billions - paying a lower top tax rate, doubling the amount their heirs can receive tax-free, and treating themselves as "pass-through" businesses able to deduct 20 percent of their income (effectively allowing Trump to cut his tax rate in half, if and when he pays taxes).

They'll make billions more as their stock portfolios soar because corporate taxes are slashed.

The biggest winners by far will be American oligarchs such as the Koch brothers; Peter Thiel, the Silicon Valley investor; Sheldon Adelson, the Las Vegas casino magnate; Woody Johnson, owner of the New York Jets football team and heir to the Johnson & Johnson fortune; and Carl Icahn, the activist investor.

The oligarchs are the richest of the richest 1 percent. They've poured hundreds of millions into the GOP and Trump. Half of all contributions to the first phase of the 2016 election came from just 158 families, along with the companies they own or control.

The giant tax cut has been their core demand from the start. They also want to slash regulations, repeal the Affordable Care Act, and cut everything else government does except for defense - including Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security.

In return, they have agreed to finance Trump and the GOP, and mount expensive public relations campaigns that magnify their lies.

Trump has fulfilled his end of the bargain. He's blinded much of his white working-class base to the reality of what's happening by means of his racist, xenophobic rants and policies.

The American oligarchs couldn't care less about what all this will cost America.

Within their gated estates and private jets, they're well insulated from the hatefulness and divisiveness.

They don't worry about whether Social Security or Medicare will be there for them in their retirement because they've put away huge fortunes.

Climate change doesn't concern them because their estates are fully insured against hurricanes, floods, and wildfires.

They don't care about public schools because their families don't attend them. They don't care about public transportation because they don't use it. They don't care about the poor because they don't see them.

They don't worry about the rising budget deficit because they borrow directly from global capital markets.

Truth to tell, they don't even care that much about America because their personal and financial interests are global.

They are living in their own separate society, and they want Congress and the President to represent them, not the rest of us.

The Republican Party is their vehicle. Fox News is their voice. Trump is their champion. The new tax plan is their triumph.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

-

Previously in tax scammage:
* Deepwater Horizon Settlement Comes With $5.35 Billion Tax Windfall.

* Offshoring By 29 Companies Costs Illinois $1.2 Billion Annually.

* Government Agencies Allow Corporations To Write Off Billions In Federal Settlements.

* The Gang Of 62 Vs. The World.

* How The Maker Of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing.

* $1.4 Trillion: Oxfam Exposes The Great Offshore Tax Scam Of U.S. Companies.

* How Barclay's Turned A $10 Billion Profit Into A Tax Loss.

* Wall Street Stock Loans Drain $1 Billion A Year From German Taxpayers.

* German Finance Minister Cries Foul Over Tax Avoidance Deals.

* Prosecutor Targets Commerzbank For Deals That Dodge German Taxes.

* A Schlupfloch Here, A Schlupfloch There. Now It's Real Money.

* How Milwaukee Landlords Avoid Taxes.

* Study: 32 Illinois Fortune 500 Companies Holding At Least $147 Billion Offshore.

* Watch Out For The Coming Tax Break Trickery.

* When A 'Tax Bonanza' Is Actually A Huge Corporate Tax Break.

* The Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump.

* Oxfam Names World's Worst Tax Havens Fueling 'Global Race To Bottom.'

* Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Illinois Small Business $5,789 A Year.

* State Tax Incentives To Corporations Don't Work.

* GOP Tax Plan Would Give 15 Of America's Largest Corporations A $236 Billion Tax Cut.

-

Previously in carried interest, aka The Billionaire's Loophole:
* Patriotic Millionaires Vs. Carried Interest.

* The Somewhat Surreal Politics Of A Private Equity Tax Loophole Costing Us Billions (That Obama Refused To Close Despite Pledging To Do So).

* Fact-Checking Trump & Clinton On The Billionaire's Tax Break.

* Despite Trump Campaign Promise, Billionaires' Tax Loophole Survives Again.

* Carried Interest Reform Is a Sham.

-

Previously in the Paradise Papers:
* 'Paradise Papers' Reveal Tax Avoidance, Shady Dealings Of World's Rich And Powerful.

* Just How Much Money Is Held Offshore? Hint: A SHIT-TON.

* Development Dreams Lost In The Offshore World.

* Keeping Offshore 'Hush Hush,' But Why?

* Tax Havens Are Alive With The Sound Of Music.

* Today In Tax Avoidance Of The Ultra-Wealthy.

* Go To Town With This Offshore Leaks Database.

* The Paradise Papers: The View From Africa And Asia.

* The Paradise Papers: The End Of Elusion For PokerStars.

* The Paradise Papers: An Odd Call From The Bermuda Government.

-

Previously in the Panama Papers:
* The Panama Papers: Remarkable Global Media Collaboration Cracks Walls Of Offshore Tax Haven Secrecy.

* The Panama Papers: Prosecutors Open Probes.

* The [Monday] Papers.

* Adventures In Tax Avoidance.

* Mossack Fonseca's Oligarchs, Dictators And Corrupt White-Collar Businessmen.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! They're All In It Together.

* Meet The Panama Papers Editor Who Handled 376 Reporters In 80 Countries.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:02 PM | Permalink

The [Tuesday] Papers

"The [Bureau of Investigative Journalism's] 2017 annual report from our Drones team shows a massive increase in air attacks by American forces in Afghanistan, Yemen and Somalia since President Donald Trump took power.

"There have been twice as many strikes in Somalia and three times as many in Yemen as the year before. In Afghanistan the number of weapons dropped is now at levels last seen during the 2009-12 surge. There are also signs that drones are returning to Pakistan's skies."

The problem?

"More civilians are being hit. In Afghanistan the UN says there were 177 civilian casualties in the first nine months of 2017 - almost twice as many as in the same period the year before."

So is the president making us safer than his predecessor or creating more (rightfully) vengeful enemies bent on doing us harm? And is America committing war crimes?

*

Also:

"As the casualties mount the U.S. has been less willing to disclose data to the Bureau and we are concerned that this makes it more difficult to hold U.S. forces to account in 2018."

We are a rogue nation.

Not that we haven't always been, on the sly, but now it's our primary identity.

-

Airbsb
"The Airbnb listing for a 'HIP 1BR' apartment near Millennium Park boasts a 'prime location' - in all capital letters - with 'amenities galore,' all for just $115 a night. The listing leaves out one key word: illegal," Crain's reports.

It's one of numerous illicit rentals in Chicago still available on Airbnb four months after the city launched a computerized system to license homes rented through the shared-housing website. The East Loop apartment is in a building that prohibits vacation rentals, but city regulators have yet to catch up with "Rapheal," the Airbnb host trying to rent it.

A lot of scofflaws like Rapheal are still falling through the cracks of a shared-housing ordinance that Chicago officials like to say is among the toughest in the country. And that's frustrating landlords and aldermen.

"I'm disappointed with how the ordinance is working so far - or not working," said downtown Ald. Brendan Reilly, 42nd. "The ordinance that is on the books was designed to fail, and that's why Airbnb was happy with it."

The ordinance, crafted by the mayor, passed the council 43-7 in June 2016. It was sponsored by Ald. Joe Moore. The "No" votes were Susan Sadlowski Garza, Patrick Daley Thompson, Marty Quinn, Derrick Curtis, Scott Waguespack, John Arena and Michele Smith. Reilly voted "Yes" - though he "predicted Airbnb would flout the new rules, 'and we'll be back in a few months' trying to pass tougher regulations," according to the Trib.

*

The Trib reported a year ago that "The city's new shared-housing ordinance and how it would affect Airbnb hosts was a hot topic in the mayor's inbox.

"Investor Marc Andreessen e-mailed Emanuel in November 2015, asking him to meet with Chris Lehane, Airbnb's head of global policy, to discuss Chicago's regulatory plans."

Lehane worked with Rahm Emanuel in the Clinton White House. The New York Times once called him a "Master of the Political Dark Arts."

"Those who know Mr. Lehane say his skill lies in his intricate understanding of how news organizations work, and in his uncanny ability to play one reporter off another," the Times reported.

*

Back to the Trib:

"Airbnb representatives said they thought Emanuel wasn't 'fully aware of what the bureaucrats have been working on,' according to an e-mail Andreessen forwarded to the mayor. Asking for the meeting seemed to be a drastic measure: In one of the emails, Andreessen's people call it an 'unusual ask' by Airbnb.

"Airbnb spokesman Ben Breit said in a statement that the home-sharing company works with cities worldwide on clear and progressive home-sharing rules. 'Speaking with policymakers and community leaders is essential to crafting home-sharing rules that work for everyone,' he said.

"The implementation of the ordinance has since been delayed and tweaked after being challenged by a couple of lawsuits."

*

Last March, the Tribune reported that Andreessen "also exchanged messages with Emanuel about how Airbnb was going to hire 'a strong supporter of yours' weeks before South Side Ald. Will Burns left City Hall to work for the company. Mark Kelly, a retired astronaut and husband of former U.S. Gabby Giffords, also e-mailed the mayor trying to set up a meeting on Airbnb's behalf."

Neither Andreessen nor Kelly had registered as lobbyists, one of a couple dozen such cases the mayor's hand-picked ethics board took up and essentially shrugged off, despite the fact that Emanuel was secretly using private e-mail to conduct public business.

-

New on the Beachwood today and since the last column . . .

GOP Tax Plan Would Give 15 Of America's Largest Corporations A $236 Billion Tax Cut
Over the last 30 years, 15 of the largest U.S. corporations have accepted $3.9 trillion of corporate welfare in the form of subsidies, tax credits, and bailouts, and another $108 billion in government handouts in the form of federal contracts. Now, Republicans want to give these corporations an additional $236 billion tax cut.

*

John Fox Going Down Fighting For Irrelevant Field Position
The hill he dies on.

*

The Weekend In Chicago Rock
Featuring: The Rubs, Thinner, Strange Lovelies, The Obsessed, Coffin Screw, Seven Lions, Blake, Marty Stuart, Hayes Carll, Ides of March, Tab Benoit, Lia Kohl & Haley Fohr, and Jeff Tweedy & Chikamorachi.

*

SportsMonday: Hit-Averse Hawks Hot
Taking non-physical hockey to the next level.

*

Chicagoetry: Winter Mice
Fatalistically determined to attain heaven.

*

Harvard Students And DOJ Will Find Answers Elusive In Quest To Learn About Admissions Decisions
"Both inquiries rest on the faulty assumption that admissions decisions are driven by an objective, measurable process that will yield the same results over and over again. It's more human - and random - than that."

*

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 1
College football fans may be among the few Americans not ready for the year to end.

*

Charter Schools Are Complicit With Segregation
"A recent Associated Press analysis of national school enrollment data found that 'as of school year 2014-2015, more than 1,000 of the nation's 6,747 charter schools had minority enrollment of at least 99 percent, and the number has been rising steadily.'"

*

Last Week In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Andrew Bird, Robbie Fulks & the Flat Five, Los Lobos, Lita Ford, Common, and The Mr. T Experience.

*

The Political Odds
Updated to reflect recent developments.

*

Trailer: Swing District
Featuring a former Chicago police officer and trader - and former Republican state legislator - who is now a 71-year-old Democratic freshman in Congress running for re-election.

This project is raising money to fund its completion. If you can help, contact me and I'll put you in touch with the filmmaker.

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The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #179: The Ryan Pace Narratives Drive Us Nuts
Willful ignorance. Plus: Devin Hester Retires Ridiculous And So Should Zach Miller; Schwarbs Shapes Up; Maddon's Song Remains The Same; Manny Madness; Real Chicago Blackhawks; and Niko Is Back.

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Illinois Coach Banned From USA Gymnastics Over Alleged Sexual Misconduct
Parents stunned; sudden retirement of decorated Westmont coach apparently explained.

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Vonnegut's Story Shapes
The master's thesis the University of Chicago rejected.

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The Sears Motor Buggy
The 1911 model came with 30-inch rims.

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RECALL! Piller's Fine Foods Ready-To-Eat Salami
Produced in Canada and shipped to distribution centers in California, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey and New York.

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Retroactivism In The Lesbian Archives
"Bessette considers a diverse array of primary sources, including grassroots newsletters, place-based archives, experimental documentary films, and digital video collections, to investigate how retroactivists have revised and replaced dominant accounts of lesbian deviance."

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Chicago For Dummies
Cosmopolitan yet not elite!

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ChicagoGram

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ChicagoTube

Skating with James Brown's style.

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BeachBook
A sampling.

I Can't Answer These Standardized Test Questions About My Own Poems.

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Subway Franchisees Rally Against $4.99 Subs.

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Remembering The [Rahmbo] Papers.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Define irony.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:01 AM | Permalink

RECALL! Piller's Fine Foods Ready-To-Eat Salami

Piller's Fine Foods, a Waterloo, Canada establishment, is recalling approximately 1,076 pounds of ready-to-eat salami and speck products that may be adulterated with Salmonella, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Saturday.

The ready-to-eat speck prosciutto and salami items were produced on Sept. 22 and Oct. 12, 2017, respectively. The following products are subject to recall:

  • Vacuum-sealed random weight plastic packages containing "Black Kassel Piller's Dry Aged D'Amour Salami" with Best Before date of May 12, 2018.
  • Vacuum-sealed random weight plastic packages containing "Black Kassel Piller's Dry Aged Speck Smoked Prosciutto" with Best Before date of May 12, 2018.

These items were produced in Canada and were shipped to distribution centers in California, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey and New York.

The problem was discovered when an FSIS sample of the ready-to-eat salami product was confirmed positive for Salmonella. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment.

In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers' freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen. The only way to confirm that meat and poultry products are cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Trent Hilpert, President, Piller's Fine Foods, at (519) 743-1412 ext. 240.

Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov.

The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

NOTE: Access news releases and other information at FSIS' website at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Follow FSIS on Twitter at twitter.com/usdafoodsafety or in Spanish at: twitter.com/usdafoodsafe_es.

USDA RECALL CLASSIFICATIONS
* Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.

* Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.

* Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice), or (202) 720-6382 (TDD).

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:49 AM | Permalink

Retroactivism In The Lesbian Archives

Grassroots historiography has been essential in shaping American sexual identities in the 20th century.

Retroactivism in the Lesbian Archives examines how lesbian collectives have employed "retroactivist" rhetorics to propel change in present identification and politics.

By appropriating and composing versions of the past, these collectives question, challenge, deconstruct, and reinvent historical discourse itself to negotiate and contest lesbian identity.

lesbianarchives.jpg

Bessette considers a diverse array of primary sources, including grassroots newsletters, place-based archives, experimental documentary films, and digital video collections, to investigate how retroactivists have revised and replaced dominant accounts of lesbian deviance.

Her analysis reveals inventive rhetorical strategies leveraged by these rhetors to belie the alienating, dispersing effects of discourses that painted women with same-sex desire as diseased and criminal.

Focusing on the Daughters of Bilitis, the Lesbian Herstory Archives, and the June L. Mazer Archives, and on historiographic filmmakers such as Barbara Hammer and Cheryl Dunye, Bessette argues that these retroactivists composed versions of a queer past that challenged then-present oppressions, joined together provisional communities, and disrupted static definitions and associations of lesbian identity.

Retroactivism in the Lesbian Archives issues a challenge to feminist and queer scholars to acknowledge how historiographic rhetoric functions in defining and contesting identities and the historical forces that shape them.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:29 AM | Permalink

December 18, 2017

GOP Tax Plan Would Give 15 Of America's Largest Corporations A $236 Billion Tax Cut

In "further proof that the Republican tax bill is a massive giveaway to the largest corporations in the country," a new report prepared for Sen. Bernie Sanders and published on Monday found that 15 of America's most profitable corporations would receive a combined $236 billion tax cut if the GOP plan becomes law.

Released as Republicans gear up for a final vote on their tax bill as early as Tuesday, the report notes that "[o]ver the last 30 years, 15 of the largest U.S. corporations have accepted $3.9 trillion of corporate welfare in the form of subsidies, tax credits, and bailouts, and another $108 billion in government handouts in the form of federal contracts."

"On top of this $4 trillion boondoggle," the analysis adds, "Republicans want to give these corporations an additional $236 billion tax cut."

citizens_0_0.jpgtakomabibelot/Flickr

Among the companies the report highlights are Apple, Pfizer and Walmart, all of which utilize fancy "accounting tricks to dodge taxes" while also taking advantage of government programs that add to their bottom lines at the expense of American taxpayers.

screen_shot_2017-12-18_at_4.46.41_pm.png

The report goes on to observe that far from living up to its lofty goal of discouraging outsourcing, the deeply unpopular GOP tax bill actually "encourages companies to shift their jobs and profits overseas by moving to a 'territorial' tax system that would exempt future offshore profits of U.S. subsidiaries from taxation."

While these companies stand to benefit massively from the GOP's bill, "more than half of middle class families will pay more in taxes at the end of ten years," Sanders said in a statement.

"Further, by running up a $1.4 trillion deficit, the Republicans are paving the way for massive cuts to Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid," Sanders concluded. "This is a tax bill written for wealthy Republican campaign contributors, not for the average American. It must be defeated."

Sanders' report coincides with an analysis released Monday by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, which found that over 82 percent of the GOP bill's benefits would go to the top one percent of Americans and nearly 60 percent would go to the top 0.1 percent by 2027.

screen_shot_2017-12-18_at_4.54.37_pm.png

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Previously in tax scammage:
* Deepwater Horizon Settlement Comes With $5.35 Billion Tax Windfall.

* Offshoring By 29 Companies Costs Illinois $1.2 Billion Annually.

* Government Agencies Allow Corporations To Write Off Billions In Federal Settlements.

* The Gang Of 62 Vs. The World.

* How The Maker Of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing.

* $1.4 Trillion: Oxfam Exposes The Great Offshore Tax Scam Of U.S. Companies.

* How Barclay's Turned A $10 Billion Profit Into A Tax Loss.

* Wall Street Stock Loans Drain $1 Billion A Year From German Taxpayers.

* German Finance Minister Cries Foul Over Tax Avoidance Deals.

* Prosecutor Targets Commerzbank For Deals That Dodge German Taxes.

* A Schlupfloch Here, A Schlupfloch There. Now It's Real Money.

* How Milwaukee Landlords Avoid Taxes.

* Study: 32 Illinois Fortune 500 Companies Holding At Least $147 Billion Offshore.

* Watch Out For The Coming Tax Break Trickery.

* When A 'Tax Bonanza' Is Actually A Huge Corporate Tax Break.

* The Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump.

* Oxfam Names World's Worst Tax Havens Fueling 'Global Race To Bottom.'

* Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Illinois Small Business $5,789 A Year.

* State Tax Incentives To Corporations Don't Work.

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Previously in carried interest, aka The Billionaire's Loophole:
* Patriotic Millionaires Vs. Carried Interest.

* The Somewhat Surreal Politics Of A Private Equity Tax Loophole Costing Us Billions (That Obama Refused To Close Despite Pledging To Do So).

* Fact-Checking Trump & Clinton On The Billionaire's Tax Break.

* Despite Trump Campaign Promise, Billionaires' Tax Loophole Survives Again.

* Carried Interest Reform Is a Sham.

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Previously in the Paradise Papers:
* 'Paradise Papers' Reveal Tax Avoidance, Shady Dealings Of World's Rich And Powerful.

* Just How Much Money Is Held Offshore? Hint: A SHIT-TON.

* Development Dreams Lost In The Offshore World.

* Keeping Offshore 'Hush Hush,' But Why?

* Tax Havens Are Alive With The Sound Of Music.

* Today In Tax Avoidance Of The Ultra-Wealthy.

* Go To Town With This Offshore Leaks Database.

* The Paradise Papers: The View From Africa And Asia.

* The Paradise Papers: The End Of Elusion For PokerStars.

* The Paradise Papers: An Odd Call From The Bermuda Government.

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Previously in the Panama Papers:
* The Panama Papers: Remarkable Global Media Collaboration Cracks Walls Of Offshore Tax Haven Secrecy.

* The Panama Papers: Prosecutors Open Probes.

* The [Monday] Papers.

* Adventures In Tax Avoidance.

* Mossack Fonseca's Oligarchs, Dictators And Corrupt White-Collar Businessmen.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! They're All In It Together.

* Meet The Panama Papers Editor Who Handled 376 Reporters In 80 Countries.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:14 PM | Permalink

The Weekend In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. The Rubs at Cole's on Friday night.


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2. Thinner at Cole's on Friday night.

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3. Strange Lovelies at Cole's on Friday night.

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4. The Obsessed at Livewire on Thursday night.

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5. Coffin Screw at the Mutiny on Thursday night.

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6. Seven Lions at the Aragon on Saturday night.

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7. Blake at Quenchers on Thursday night.

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8. Marty Stuart at the Old Town School on Saturday night.

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9. Hayes Carll at the Old Town School on Friday night.

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10. Ides of March at the Arcada in St. Charles on Saturday night.

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11. Tab Benoit at City Winery on Saturday night.

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Catching up with . . .

Lia Kohl and Haley Fohr at the Hideout on December 13th.

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Chikamorachi and Jeff Tweedy at the Hideout on December 13th.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:51 PM | Permalink

John Fox Going Down Fighting For Irrelevant Field Position

"It was just a football game against a division team that was in playoff contention," Adam Hoge writes for WGN-AM.

There, you just read the worst lede in the history of sports writing.

Except that sentence is actually a direct quote from the head coach of the Chicago Bears after John Fox fell to 3-14 against the NFC North with a 20-10 loss to the Lions Saturday at Ford Field.

"Overall, I think it was just a football game against a division team that was in playoff contention," Fox said as he opened his postgame press conference. "We just didn't start fast. We had penalties, in particularly on offense. To spot them 13 points in the first half, the guys battled, kind of semi got back into it. But a little bit too little too late."

By "semi got back into it," Fox means the Bears scored their first touchdown of the game with 2:32 left in the fourth quarter before "semi" trying an on-side kick by pooching the ball 37 yards downfield where there were exactly zero players wearing Bears jerseys.

Fox also "semi" tried to score points earlier in the game before punting on 4th-and-1 on his own 45 yard line. And, according to him, he never even "semi" considered going for it, despite trailing 6-0 early in the second quarter - or, perhaps more notably, owning a 4-9 record.

And so on.

At least we won't - presumably - have John Fox to kick around much longer. Ryan Pace, inexplicably, appears to be a different story.

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"Whenever the Chicago Bears win a game, which has happened a grand total of 13 times in three years, GM Ryan Pace is labeled a genius and the Bears are Super Bowl bound," Barry Rozner writes for the Daily Herald.

And whenever the Bears lose a game, coach John Fox should be fired.

Never has a Bears narrative run so askew.

Fox is always wrong. Pace is always right. Might be something wrong with the math on this one as they are joined at the hip.

Fox is 13-33 in Chicago, but so is Pace, who owns the roster after three years of drafting and signing.

Now 4-10 in 2017 after a loss in Detroit Saturday, the Bears' problems today are nearly all the same problems they had when Pace got here.

Three years is an eternity in the NFL where rebuilds can be done quickly if you draft and sign impact players who can change a game instantly.

Who does that for the Bears consistently on either side of the ball?

Only Tarik Cohen - on special teams, which technically isn't either side of the ball.

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"Chicago Bears coach John Fox's decision to punt on fourth-and-1 from the team's 45-yard line on Saturday caused a stir amongst Windy City sports fans," Jeff Dickerson writes for ESPN.

At 4-10 (the Bears were still 4-9 when Fox elected to kick on fourth down) the season is virtually over. Why not just go for it? What do you have to lose?

"Yeah, you do got something to lose, that's called field position," Fox said after the Bears fell 20-10 to the Lions. "We failed to have that much of the day, largely to some of our inability to move the ball, in particularly the first half. I think, sure, you can go for that, but it can bite you too."

There's no denying the Bears had trouble moving the ball. Chicago went to the halftime locker room with only five first downs and 90 total yards.

Still, showing a little faith in your offense to pick up 1 yard isn't a bad thing. The Bears do have Jordan Howard, who's rushed for 1,000 yards in back-to-back seasons.

On cue, the Lions marched 92 yards on 10 plays and scored a touchdown immediately after Fox attempted to play it safe.

Missing from the reporting: What do the analytics say about going for it on fourth down there?

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"Later, after the Bears scored a touchdown to make the score 20-10 with 2 minutes, 32 seconds remaining, Fox had kicker Mike Nugent try a pooch kick with the regular kickoff coverage unit instead of a traditional onside kick with the hands team on the field," Rich Campbell writes for the Tribune. "

The Bears had all three of their timeouts.

The Lions recovered that ball easily.

"Again, it's field position," Fox explained. "There was time enough left in the game."

If it was about field position, you would have just had Nugent kick the ball deep. If it was about going out trying, an onside kick would have been in order - especially after noticing, as Fox should have, that the Lions' hands-team was not on the field. The in-between is death.

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Ha ha.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 11:40 AM | Permalink

SportsMonday: Hit-Averse Hawks Hot

Remember way back at the beginning of the Blackhawks' season when fans were worried about the team's depth on defense, especially after the team traded away veteran blue-liner and ultra-shot-blocking tough guy Niklas Hjalmarsson?

Well, that is no longer a concern.

Not after Jordan Oesterle, languishing as the seventh defenseman on a team only playing six, started seeing ice time eight games ago.

He's been nothing but good (piling up an impressive plus-6 rating) and had his best game Sunday night as the Hawks made it six victories in a row with a 4-1 thrashing of the Minnesota Wild. If the season ended today, the Hawks would squeak into the playoffs as a wild card, something they weren't able to say for an uncomfortably long time.

Oh, and eighth defenseman Michal Kempny, who also sat out for a long stretch (13 games) before returning recently due to an injury to Jan Rutta? He fired in a valuable insurance goal late in the Hawks' win over Winnipeg last Thursday night, their most dominant and important win this season.

In that game, the Hawks displayed a fascinating strategy of late: taking non-physical hockey to the next level. They were credited with only two hits - to the Jets' 25 - in that game.

Now, Hawks play-by-play man Pat Foley posited during the broadcast last night that those numbers were not quite accurate and that some hometown Winnipeg scorekeeping came into play. But the bottom line is the Hawks hardly hit anyone in that game and still took home a much-needed 5-1 win.

I'm guessing what is really going on here is that the Hawks have enough skill that they have made a conscious decision to dial the physicality way back. And if they aren't initiating borderline checks, they are oftentimes avoiding the sorts of penalties that can set teams back in games against teams like the Jets with strong power plays.

Now if another team dials up the physical play, my guess is the Hawks will respond in kind. But that hasn't happened yet. You can bet it will at some point, especially in the playoffs. And isn't it nice to feel so much more comfortable saying something like that than you did two weeks ago, when the Hawks were outside of playoff position looking in.

It is amazing what a big ol' win streak can do.

As the Hawks have played well against good teams the past three games, Patrick Kane has led the way. It appears he is shooting more of late after spending a big chunk of last season finding new and delightful ways to set set up linemates Artemi Panarin and Artem Anisimov.

But this year he is playing with pass-first, and second and third, linemate Nick Schmaltz. And while Schmaltz needs to start shooting more at some point, for now Kane is always looking for a pass and has had a great stretch of putting it in the net.

Last night in the first period, Kane sent a cross-ice pass to Schmaltz a moment before both crossed the blue line. When Schmaltz found a way to send a pass right back, Kane had opened himself up and was perfectly prepared to blast a perfect one-timer for the Hawks' first lead.

Then in the second period, Oesterle made his sweet, almost 100-foot pass from his own end to Kane on a change just as he crossed the attacking blue line. Kane didn't miss, the Hawks had a well-deserved 2-0 lead, and they took it home from there.

The Blackhawks, in a wild card spot for now, are only four points behind Winnipeg for the third playoff spot in the division, take to the road for the rest of the calendar year.

They travel to Dallas on Thursday and New Jersey on Saturday before taking a nice, four-day break for Christmas. Then it is games at Vancouver and Edmonton before capping off the year in Calgary on New Years's Eve.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:53 AM | Permalink

Chicagoetry: Winter Mice

Winter Mice

The winter mice are reappearing,
As if they've been there all along, invisible,
Walking through walls,

Fatalistically determined like lemmings
Or salmon
To attain heaven.

Last season's traps remain, steadfast, solitary,
Positioned strategically in regular lanes
Of entry and exit,

Old wood-and-steel models aid sleek new black
Plastic ones.

The old, dried peanut butter baits
Will need to be refreshed;
Harder with the old traps but
Lessons have been learned.

My technique is now highly refined,

Having endured a learning curve with wood-and-steel:
You'll break a knuckle if you don't
Play your cards right and if you get

The cheapest ones, with the lame, plastic fake cheese
Release mechanisms,
They're worthless.

You get used to the insult
Of seeing the bait soon cleared
Without the trap springing. "Little fuckers!"

I wish I could welcome and nourish them,
Allow them to flourish, but alas, they might bring plague.
They make me feel anxious and unclean.

Sometimes at night I hear the metal ones snap
And know some little thing is suffering.
Every time I view such, I gasp aloud.

Sometimes I don't find them for a day or two, jumping
At the discovery (along with the gasp).
I pitch the entire apparatus - trap plus small, gray,

Lifeless body - into the trash.

The new black plastic models
Are easier to set up and just as effective
For the slaughter that looms,

A harvest of miniature regrets.

Last winter seemed a holocaust.
They just kept coming!
I would, too, if I were homeless

In winter
And could walk through walls.

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J.J. Tindall is the Beachwood's poet-in-residence. He welcomes your comments. Chicagoetry is an exclusive Beachwood collection-in-progress.

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More Tindall:

* Chicagoetry: The Book

* Ready To Rock: The Music

* Kindled Tindall: The Novel

* The Viral Video: The Match Game Dance

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:47 AM | Permalink

Vonnegut's Story Shapes

Are certain familiar narrative arcs inherently appealing?

Although his master's thesis on the topic was rejected by the University of Chicago's anthropology department, it's hard to discount the acuity of Kurt Vonnegut's theory of "story shapes."

This archival video features Vonnegut using a chalkboard and his famous deadpan wit to map out three highly familiar narrative arcs that seem to have lost none of their popularity despite countless iterations:

He addressed story shapes at greater length in his essay collection A Man Without a Country (2005).

The U.S. graphic designer Maya Eilam later adapted his archetypes into a series of handy infographics, which can be viewed at her website.

This post originally appeared at Aeon.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:55 AM | Permalink

December 15, 2017

The World's Greatest College Football Report's Bowl Game Preview Part 1

College football fans may be among the few Americans not ready for the year to end. The bulk of the nation, if not busy fleeing "nightmarish flame and towering smoke", plunging into debt in a shopping orgy, or camping out in line for Star Wars*, will welcome Baby New Year with open arms. That is, until Junior is outed by the FBI for babbling state secrets into his Classic Fisher-Price Chatter Phone toy. For now, we can look forward to 2018 with the naive optimism that is the calling card of this great nation. Should you need a distraction in the interim, CBS, ABC, Fox Sports, and all the ESPNs have you covered. Just ask any college football fan: we are entering the Gridiron Grand Finale, the Pigskin Pinnacle, the seasonal smorgasbord that is Bowl . . . er, Season. Forty (for-ty, four-zero, FORTY!) games await beginning with a brief slate of games this weekend. Call them the amuse-bouche. We are not above eager anticipation of the Raycom Media Camellia Bowl and others kicking off this Saturday.

Note: this Report omits the Celebration Bowl for no other reason than we don't want to slip down the slope that is covering anything outside the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision.

The R+L Carriers New Orleans Bowl
Troy University Trojans (-6.5) vs. University of North Texas Mean Green
Saturday, December 16, 1 p.m. ESPN (Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, LA)

Selecting the nickname for Troy University's football squad must have been among the easiest decision in sports. The origin story of the Mean Green, however, is murky. Several competing tales claim the coach's wife, or the announcer, or various other sources, picked the name.

Our favorite involves an impromptu cheer led by two drunken NTU football players. Legend has it that during a game in the late '60s, UNT players Willie "Sleepy" Davis and Ira "Hotrod" Daniels downed a bottle (a little one, supposedly, however keep in mind this is Texas, where Everything Is Bigger) at halftime and Davis, irritated at the crowd's lack of enthusiasm in the second half, sprung to his feet and led the student section in a rousing chorus of "Mean Green, you look so good to me!" We have no idea what that means. Perhaps the lyric referenced the dominant play of Pittsburgh Steelers legend "Mean" Joe Greene. It's unclear. Also, drinking at halftime?

College Football Report pick: All the money (85%) is on Troy. Betting the chalk is boring and uncontroversial. Experts look lazy when picking the favorite. And yet . . . An early line movement from -7 to -6.5 may be the only cause to believe the 'dogs are underrated. (Perhaps not the only reason, as the Mean Green did finish with a 9-4 record including wins against . . . well, one of the Ws came against the Texas-San Antonio Roadrunners, so let's not look further at UNT's record.) Bettors aren't exempt from dumb herd animal behavior any more than other large group of people, but we think taking the favorite is the move here. You'll note a trend throughout in fact.

The College Football Free Range Antibiotic Free Sacred Chicken**: Troy by 2.

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AutoNation Cure Bowl
Western Kentucky Hilltoppers (-6) vs. Georgia State Panthers
Saturday, December 16, 1:30 p.m. CBSSN (Camping World Stadium in Orlando, FL)

This will not be the last time we consult Google for the nature of a bowl game. This Cure Bowl will be presented by AutoNation which, we can guess without consulting the Font of All Human Knowledge, is a seller or insurer of automobiles. Apart from imagining the bowl is dedicated to some cause pitted against an affliction we'd all rather avoid, we couldn't hazard a guess as to the nature of the Cure Bowl. Ah, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation as it turns out. Pink, lots of pink.

CFR pick: We have always had a soft spot for the 'Toppers. Go Big Red!

The Chicken: WKU by 5.

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The Las Vegas Bowl
Oregon Ducks (-7.5) vs. #25 Boise State Broncos
Saturday, December 16, 2:30 p.m. ABC (Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas, NV)

The Las Vegas Bowl will be played in Las Vegas this year. Why these two teams, perennial contenders (Oregon) or at least spoilers (Boise), are playing in a preamble game is unclear. We do expect plenty of fireworks. Defense isn't a strong suit for either squad.

CFR pick: Over 59.5

The Chicken: Boise by 4

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The GILDAN New Mexico Bowl
Marshall Thundering Herd vs. Colorado State Rams (-5)
Saturday, December 16, 3:30 p.m. ESPN (Branch Field at Dreamstyle Stadium, in Albuquerque, NM)

Let's talk about the location for the hotly anticipated New Mexico Bowl. Beyond the controversial selection of New Mexico for the New Mexico Bowl, the site itself presents a titillating world of possibilities. Dreamstyle? Are we talking about martial arts? The Sybaris of the Southwest? Mattress. We're going mattress.

Alas, no. Apparently the naming rights went to Dreamstyle Remodeling, a local construction firm. (For the low price of $10 million, let's note.)

CFR pick: Colorado State hung with Alabama before folding 41-23 back in September and should overmatch the Herd without much trouble. The Rams have had mixed success in close games (2-2 in games decided by one score) however so keep an eye on the clock.

The Chicken: Marshall by 9

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The Raycom Media Camellia Bowl
Middle Tennessee State Blue Raiders vs. Arkansas State Red Wolves (-3.5)
Saturday, December 16, 7:00 p.m. ESPN (Crampton Bowl in Montgomery, AL)

We have inexplicably referred to MTSU as Mountain Dew State since . . . forever. Why? Most likely due to the school's location although the actual reason has been lost to time. As evidence of The Volunteer State's obsession with Mountain Dew and general insanity we'd point to young people's obsession with "dewshine" (not the real thing - which, let's be honest, sounded pretty awesome) but the bootleg version. To formulate Dewshine, yellow-bellied youth mix the soda with alcohol. We use that term loosely as anything close at hand can be used, even, for the truly idiotic, racing fuel. Fuel up, Tennesseans. Have your fun now before your teeth fall out from Mountain Dew Mouth.

Getting back to the game, the Red Wolves deserve a long look. Arkansas State always fields a frisky team. Especially under the tutelage of former Head Coach Gus Malzahn (now overseeing Auburn), ASU beat some legit teams and outright crushed conference foes. A notable game back in 2012 featured the same matchup as the Camellia Bowl with the Red Wolves posting a 45-0 spanking over Mountain Dew State. Saturday won't be as lopsided but winning tends to be contagious. Malzahn raised ASU's national profile and the team fields some decent talent.

CFR pick: Arkansas State

The Chicken: The Red Wolves by 16

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* Here is the official College Football Report last-minute gift idea: join the Antioxidants Alliance and "Unite for a Healthy Galaxy" by gifting some Star Wars-branded Dole fruit to your loved ones.

** For those unfamiliar, the College Football Report Sacred Chicken, (now Free Range and Antibiotic Free), debuted in 2013 honoring the Roman Empire's soothsaying fowls. Senators and generals consulted the sacred chickens before every momentous decision. The luminaries released the birds, caged and starved for days, onto a heap of grain and, if the chickens "ate it avidly while stamping their feet and scattering" the kernels, fate bode well. If not, the augury was unfavorable. Woe betide he who disregarded the chickens' omen.

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Mike Luce is The World's Greatest College Football Columnist. He welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:43 PM | Permalink

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #179: The Ryan Pace Narratives Drive Us Nuts

Willful ignorance. Plus: Devin Hester Retires Ridiculous And So Should Zach Miller; Schwarbs Shapes Up; Maddon's Song Remains The Same; Manny Madness; Real Chicago Blackhawks; and Niko Is Back.


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SHOW NOTES

* 179.

* Even when putrid, the Bears are the No. 1 story in town.

* Why fans go.

* Willful ignorance in the men's room.

7:50: Devin Hester Retires Ridiculous And So Should Zach Miller And Ryan Pace.

* The Tarik Cohen model.

* Hall-of-Famer No-Brainer.

* The U, baby!

* Zach Miller, dead-ender.

* When sports end.

* The Ryan Pace Narratives Drives Us Nuts.

* The fifth Bears draft pick in 2017 was Jordan Morgan, a Division II offensive lineman who has spent the season on IR.

38:29: Schwarbs Shapes Up; Maddon's Song Remains The Same.

* For some reason, this really grinds Coach's gears!

* Joe Maddon Has Never Made A Mistake, According To Joe Maddon.

* Mike Montgomery Goes Rogue; Odd Man Out.

* Joe Maddon Is The Tom Thibodeau Of Bullpens.

* Chili Heyward.

58:15: Manny Madness.

1:02:04: Real Chicago Blackhawks.

* Wingelsy!

1:06:10: Niko Is Back.

* And screwing up the lottery.

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STOPPAGE: 12:46

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For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:13 PM | Permalink

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Andrew Bird at the Fourth Presbyterian Church on Thursday night.


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2. Robbie Fulks and the Flat Five at the Hideout on Monday night.

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3. Los Lobos at City Winery on Wednesday night.

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4. Lita Ford at the Brauerhouse in Lombard on Sunday night.

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Catching up with . . .

Common at the new DePaul arena last Saturday night.

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The Mr. T Experience at the Bottom Lounge on December 1st.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:27 AM | Permalink

Trailer: Swing District

The 2018 midterms are likely to be the most closely watched congressional elections in U.S. history! Swing District will follow one of the most competitive House races in the country, Arizona's 1st, while also exploring the reasons why Congress has become increasingly unpopular with American voters. Watch!


Synopsis: American confidence in Congress sits at an embarrassing low. Capitol Hill has been hyper-polarized and gridlocked for far too long. There are plenty of good people whom we elect to serve in our government, so why are they unable to do more good for the country? What are the true defects in the system?

In 2018, the documentary film Swing District will follow 71-year-old freshman congressman Tom O'Halleran in his capacities as a moderate Democratic legislator in Washington, D.C., and as a candidate seeking re-election in his Arizona swing district.

Once voters have selected a Republican nominee in the primary, the film will cover both campaigns as they square off in the general election. We will also hear from Republicans and Democrats in the House who serve with Tom.

In addition to the structural and political challenges that Swing District will portray, the audience will also get an insight into the personal sacrifice that is required to run, win and serve as a member of the U.S. Congress.

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From Wikipedia:

"O'Halleran served with the Chicago Police Department from 1966 to 1979. He then became a member of the Chicago Board of Trade, operating his own futures trading business.

"O'Halleran formerly served as a Republican in the Arizona State Legislature. He represented the 1st District in the Senate from 2007 to 2009, but was unseated by primary challenger Steve Pierce during the 2008 election cycle. Prior to that, he served in the Arizona House of Representatives from 2001 through 2006.

"In 2014 he resigned from the Republican Party, citing the party's policies on education, water and child welfare as reasons for his departure. He then stood for election in the 6th District as an independent, losing by 3 percent."

On November 8, 2016, O'Halleran won a seat in Congress, defeating his Republican opponent with 51 percent of the vote.

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Michael Golden is the author of Unlock Congress. Beachwood editor and publisher Steve Rhodes was an editor of the book. Golden is now seeking funding to complete Swing District. If you're interested, contact him through Steve.

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Previously in Michael Golden:
* A Ruinous Rule.

* Q&A With Michael Golden:

* Lawrence Lessig:

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:40 AM | Permalink

The Sears Motor Buggy

"On November 26, 2017, the Secret Lives of Objects exhibition closed after a three-and-a-half-year run, requiring museum staff to return the exhibition's artifacts to storage. One of the largest was a Model P motor buggy sold by Sears, Roebuck & Company around 1910."


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See also:
* CNN: See The Car That Sears Used To Sell.

* SearsMotorBuggy.com.

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And:

1908 Model.

*

1911 Model Came With 30-Inch Rims.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:15 AM | Permalink

Chicago For Dummies

Cosmopolitan yet not elitist!

Read Chicago For Dummies | PDF books from hukewe

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:11 AM | Permalink

December 14, 2017

Illinois Coach Banned From USA Gymnastics Over Alleged Sexual Misconduct

"The gymnastics community let out a collective 'shock' and 'disbelief' on Monday upon learning the news that former elite gymnast Todd Gardiner of the Illinois Gymnastics Institute and one of the most decorated Illinois coaches in the sport was found by USA Gymnastics to have violated their code of ethical of conduct," NBC5 reports.


*

"The Indianapolis-based organization declined to provide specifics, but a spokeswoman said Gardiner's name was added Dec. 7 to its list of coaches who are permanently ineligible to coach again in the sport," the Tribune reports.

According to an e-mail obtained by the Tribune, Gardiner retired Nov. 16. In the e-mail, which Gardiner sent out to IGI parents, he addressed his limited involvement with the program over the last several months. The e0mail did not provide specifics about what prompted his sudden retirement.

"I've owned and operated gymnastics facilities in the western suburbs for nearly 40 years and have committed my life to the community, our athletes, and IGI's core values," Gardiner's e-mail read, in part. "It has been a pleasure to serve all of you. Though my involvement with IGI is over, I know its best days are still ahead."

According to his online biography, Gardiner was a national elite champion in his youth who attended Hinsdale Central High School and went on to coach at the institute, which he opened in 1979. The institute, which has operated at various locations in DuPage County, has produced about 90 full-tuition college scholarships and qualified athletes to the U.S. Olympic trials, according to its website.

In 1999, Gardiner started the well-known "Chicago Style Meet," which is held each year at Navy Pier.

The spokesperson "also confirmed the action taken against Gardiner is not related to the national scandal involving a former elite sports doctor who had worked at Michigan State University and with whom Gardiner has known professionally.

"This month, Larry Nassar was sentenced to 60 years in prison on federal child pornography charges. Nassar also is awaiting sentencing after he pleaded guilty to molestation charges."

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Previously:
* When USA Gymnastics Turned A Blind Eye To Sexual Abuse.

* USA Gymnastics Named In New Sexual Abuse Lawsuit.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:43 PM | Permalink

Harvard Students And DOJ Will Find Answers Elusive In Quest To Learn About Admissions Decisions

After weeks of negotiation, Harvard University recently agreed to provide the Department of Justice access to its admissions files. The department is reopening a complaint by 63 Asian-American groups alleging that Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants. The complaint was previously dismissed under the Obama administration. Some educators, elected officials and public policy advocates worry that government lawyers plan to use the case to argue that all race-conscious admissions - including affirmative action - are a violation of the Civil Rights Act.

Separately, Harvard undergraduates have recently begun to take advantage of their right to view their own admissions files, often only to become frustrated in their efforts to pinpoint exactly why they got admitted.

The inquiries of the Department of Justice and the curious Harvard students have something in common: Both are unlikely to turn up any evidence of why some applicants make the cut and others don't. That's because both inquiries rest on the faulty assumption that admissions decisions are driven by an objective, measurable process that will yield the same results over and over again. As a Harvard professor who has studied and written a book about college admissions and their impact on students, I can tell you that's just not how it works.

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(I am not speaking officially for Harvard and I am not involved in undergraduate admissions.)

Elite private universities have made clear time and again that their admissions decisions are made through a holistic decision-making process that involves a series of discussions among the admissions team.

This means, for example, that Harvard rejects 1 in 4 students with perfect SAT scores. The University of Pennsylvania and Duke University reject three out of five high school valedictorians.

Despite universities like Harvard, Princeton, Yale, and Stanford having closely aligned admissions criteria and similar rates of admission, just because an applicant gets into one school does not mean the applicant will get into another. That's why it makes headlines when a student is reported to have gained admission to all the Ivies. This is a rare, unexpected event.

What A Holistic Approach Entails

So, how do universities make admissions decisions? William Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions at Harvard, writes of an "expansive view of excellence." This includes "extracurricular distinction and personal qualities" in addition to test scores and grades. Evaluating applications is a long process. At Harvard, it involves at least two readers of each file. It also involves discussions among a subcommittee of at least four individuals that last up to an hour. This process is similar for other selective colleges. Admissions officers at the same university often differ about which students to admit. The process is more art than science.

Holistic evaluation allows admissions officers to take into account opportunities, hardships and other experiences that may have affected an applicant's grades and SAT scores. They may also consider how those things affected their participation in activities outside of school. Nevertheless, the outcomes of admission to the most elite colleges are unequal. In fact, while 37 percent of young adults in the United States are black or Latino, just 19 percent of students at the top 100 colleges in the country are.

In addition, while only one-third of American adults have a bachelor's degree, a review of Ivy League universities' published data reveals that about 85 percent of students have a parent with a bachelor's degree. So, even if holistic evaluation does a better job than looking at test scores and grades alone, the process still concludes by systematically undervaluing working class, poor, black and Latino young men and women. That is, if we assume that talent and "personal qualities" are equally distributed in our society, this disproportion should tell us something is amiss.

In addition to the holistic evaluation process, admissions teams need to consider the needs of specific groups on campus. These needs vary from campus to campus and from year to year. Coaches can recruit top athletes for positions on their teams played by graduating seniors, and those recruits enter the fast lane to admission. And, just as the baseball coach can recruit a shortstop, the orchestra director may request a top bassoon player to fill a missing part in the orchestra. Since needs of campus organizations and teams vary from year to year, you can't glean much from admission files in isolation like the DOJ and curious students hope to do.

Merit Is Overrated

Are there any discernible patterns between who gets in and students who were seriously considered but rejected? Probably not. Harvard President Drew Faust has said that Harvard could fill its incoming class twice with high school valedictorians.

In fact, we should discard the notion that admissions is a meritocratic process that selects the "best" 18-year-olds who apply to a selective university. When we let go of our meritocracy ideals, we see more clearly that so many talented, accomplished young people who will be outstanding leaders in the future will not make it to the likes of Harvard, Stanford and Yale. There simply are not enough places for all of them at those universities.

Further, many more disadvantaged young people have never had the opportunity to cultivate talents because their parents did not have the resources to pay for private music lessons or a pitching coach. In fact, the gap between what wealthy and poor parents spend on extracurricular activities has dramatically increased in recent years. So looking for explanations for why you did get in, or whether some groups are favored over others, misses the broader picture of the lack of clarity on what gets anyone into elite colleges. It also ignores the unequal opportunities young Americans have in the process.

One way forward for college admissions, which I have suggested as a thought experiment in my book, is to take all qualified students for a selective college and enter them into an admissions lottery. The lottery could have weights for desired characteristics the college deems important, such as social class, geographic diversity, race and intended major. This method would make clear the arbitrariness in the admissions process. It would also help students admitted (and those not admitted) understand that admission - and rejection - should not hold the strong social meaning in American society that it does today.

In The Diversity Bargain, I show the downsides of maintaining students' beliefs that college admissions is a meritocracy. Most students expressed strong faith in a process that ultimately underselects black, Latino and working class applicants, among others. They will take these understandings with them as they ascend to positions of power and make hiring decisions, design tax policies and shape media discourses.

Until the Department of Justice and admitted students understand the arbitrary nature of how admissions decisions at elite colleges are made, they will be perplexed by the complex art that is elite college admissions.

Natasha Warikoo is an associate professor of education at Harvard. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

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Previously:
* The Truth Behind Jared Kushner's Acceptance Into Harvard.

* Jared Kushner Isn't Alone: Universities Still Give Rich And Connected Applicants A Leg.

* America Has Never Had A Merit-Based System For College Admissions.

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Comments welcome.

The Conversation

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:12 AM | Permalink

Charter Schools Are Complicit With Segregation

Charter schools didn't create segregation but the charter school movement isn't helping to end it either.

When Martin Luther King Jr. said, "We must never adjust ourselves to racial segregation," he wasn't suggesting that black kids need white kids and teachers in the classroom with them to learn. King was acutely aware that segregation sustains racial inequality in schools and other institutions. Education reform without an explicit attempt to dismantle the sources of inequality isn't a moon shot toward justice; it is simply a maladjustment to injustice.

A recent Associated Press analysis of national school enrollment data found that "as of school year 2014-2015, more than 1,000 of the nation's 6,747 charter schools had minority enrollment of at least 99 percent, and the number has been rising steadily."

A startling number, but the charter school lobby essentially responded with a version of, "So what?"

"Academics, attorneys, and activists can hold any opinion they want about public charter schools and other families' school choices," said a spokesperson for the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools in an official response to the AP story. "In the end, parents' and students' opinions are the only ones that matter. And every year, more parents are choosing charter schools."

New York magazine columnist Jonathan Chait co-signed that dismissal of segregation with a column that essentially argued it's not really the job of charter schools to change the system of oppression that created schools that perform poorly, "because integrating schools is hard," and he calls the criticism of increased segregation among charters as merely a "talking point." For Chait, rising test scores trump segregation concerns.

In the all-charter district of New Orleans - that Chait described at the 2015 anniversary of Hurricane Katrina as "spectacular" in another defense of charters - virtually no (less than one percent) white students attend schools in that have earned a "D" or "F" performance rating. But 77 percent of white students are enrolled in "A-" and "B-" rated schools, according to a new report by non-profit advocacy group Urban League of Louisiana. It is unthinkable that this situation would be tolerated if the students' races were reversed. It is clear that segregation, and who gets a quality choice, matters.

My colleagues Richard V. Reeves, Nathan Joo, and Grover J. "Russ" Whitehurst at the think tank the Brookings Institution compared the racial composition of country's public schools to that of the under-18 population of those neighborhoods. They found that schools more or less look like the neighborhoods that host them.

"The average public school is 2.6 percent less white, 1.8 percent more black, 0.9 percent more Hispanic, and 0.3 percent more Asian than its surrounding neighborhood," according to the study. No surprise there.

The segregated state of our schools helps maintain the inequitable funding that determines families' educational options. When the government-backed Home Owner's Loan Corporation developed color-coded maps to sort out who could receive mortgage lending, blacks who lived in the red sections of the map were not given loans. And of course, the most well-resourced schools just happen to be located in the most expensive neighborhoods.

The Brookings team looked closely at district lines, and they found that if you remove them, many schools become more racially imbalanced. It seems to me that wealthy neighborhoods are using district lines to leverage themselves against demographic shifts. According to EdBuild, a non-profit focused on school finance issues, the most egregious cases of segregation are shown by the roughly 36 districts that were formed since 2000 as a result of secession - when a school district splits from a larger one.

U.S. News & World Report explained the study's results: "In almost all cases, the communities involved were less diverse and had higher property values than those they left behind."

The Brookings report found that among the racially imbalanced schools, charters stood out as having a much higher representation of black students. Their imbalance rating is roughly four times that of traditional public schools. (You can see how your school compares through this interactive map). Charters didn't cause segregation, but they sure aren't helping matters.

In many cases, school district lines are the more potent Confederate monuments that we still need to take down. Proponents of charter schools say that by disrupting school districts that were largely created along discriminatory and segregated lines, charters improve the number of options you have. And sure, giving kids a quality education is an excellent goal. But getting to the source of inequity is real reform.

In a statement in response to the AP story, Shavar Jeffries, national president of Democrats for Education Reform, said sarcastically, "Apparently, the school segregation problem boils down to Black and Brown parents choosing schools that aren't White enough, as if the doors of all-White schools would magically open if only they had the good sense to seek to enroll their children in them."

We shouldn't conflate insincere calls for diversity (read: making schools whiter) with demands to topple segregated schools. Schools should get the resources they need, whether middle-class white students attend them or not. Our fascination with inclusion is inherently corrupt, because it is born of the misconception that whiter schools are better. Jeffries makes this point. But education reform absent an effort to dismantle segregated schools is equally bad. To blame teachers, parents and district bureaucracy (especially when they are black) is to ignore the history of how schools became depressed. To dismiss segregation is to accept structural inequality and the status quo.

We've simply given up on the radical idea of integrating schools. The last major effort occurred in 2007, in the Supreme Court case Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1. The court ruled that Seattle and Louisville school districts' efforts to desegregate/integrate schools by using individuals' race to place students in schools were unconstitutional. The "diverse by design" coalition, a group of deliberately integrated schools that poses more of a threat to structural inequality, offers some hope.

The AP study pointed to the right problem with charter schools: an overrepresentation of black and brown students. As the AP report states, "[L]evels of segregation correspond with low achievement levels at schools of all kinds." What the AP report, Chait and some charter advocates haven't said is how willing we are to experiment on the lives of black students and black-majority school districts instead of doing the hard work to eradicate the causes of segregation.

Make no mistake, segregated schools of the past and present are a result of horrible policy choices that most people are willing to accept. There is a reason that after more than 20 years, the research is mixed on charter schools. Schools in black and brown communities were built on broken foundations - i.e., segregation. By not addressing segregation, reformers are turning off the stove when the house is going up in flames.

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

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Previously by Andre Perry:
* Black And Brown Kids Don't Need To Learn 'Grit,' They Need Schools To Stop Being Racist.

* Why Black Lives Matter Should Take On Charter Schools.

* Don't Be Surprised If Colin Kaepernick Prompts More Schoolchildren To Sit For The Pledge Of Allegiance.

* "Wraparound" Services Are Not The Answer.

* Youth Aren't Props.

* NOLA's Secret Schools.

* Poor Whites Just Realized They Need Education Equity As Much As Black Folk.

* Letting Our Boys Onto The Football Field Is A Losing Play.

* America Has Never Had A Merit-Based System For College Admissions.

* Don't Ever Conflate Disaster Recovery With Education Reform.

* Black Athletes Can Teach Us About More Than Just Sports.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:40 AM | Permalink

December 13, 2017

The [Wednesday] Papers

The Papers will appear next this weekend, maybe.

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Real-time commentary on the Alabama Senate race/result can be found at @BeachwoodReport.

Meanwhile . . .

New on the Beachwood . . .

Why Was This Game Even Scheduled?

Thanks, Jeremy.

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Public Lands Matter
"Utah may feel like it is far away, but we have our own public lands in Cook County. They're called the Forest Preserves and we have nearly 70,000 acres of these precious, protected lands."

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Leaked Documents Expose How Corporations Use Spies to Subvert Political Movements Worldwide
Including Illinois' very own Caterpillar.

See also: Caterpillar CEO's Plan Is Starting To Pay Off.

The frames by which the media judges companies and their executives . . .

To wit:

Caterpillar And Boeing Buoyed By China Growth.

See also: The Big Cat Kowtows To The Red Dragon.

Or this from A World Made For Money: Economy, Geography and the The Way We Live Today:

Screen Shot 2017-12-13 at 10.12.31 AM.png

Or this, from just two days ago:

Per a Wall Street Journal report, a subsidiary of Caterpillar has pleaded guilty to cheating customers with needless repairs in order to boost repair revenues. The subsidiary, United Industries LLC, part of Caterpillar's Progress Rail Services unit, has to pay a criminal fine of $5 million and $20 million in restitution.

United Industries' main role was examining parts of railcars to ascertain whether repairs were required. Per another Wall Street Journal report which came out three years ago, United Industries supervisors had instructed staffers to destroy brake parts with hammers, ruin wheels with chisels, and loosen handles. Employees would improperly remove functioning parts located on the railcars and replace them with new or reconditioned parts, even though the parts being replaced did not need replacement.

Subsequently, employees tossed parts into the Port of Long Beach harbor to avoid the eyes of inspectors.

Business journalism can be so much better. Don't fawn over CEOs. Understand the pain often inflicted to grow profits - and reflect that in your coverage. Cover business as hard as government - and put some of your best investigative reporters on it. The private sector's impact on readers and citizens is arguably far larger than the public sector's.

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Finally: "As CEO of Peoria-based Caterpillar, Douglas Oberhelman is the most outspoken business leader in Illinois," the Tribune once noted.

And in that role, the now-retired executive bitched and moaned endlessly about how much government was hampering his ability to make more money.

Yet, "Caterpillar's sales, profits and share price fell in 2015, but Doug Oberhelman, chief executive of the industrial-equipment manufacturer, got a raise. Oberhelman's total compensation grew 4.5 percent to $17.9 million, according to a proxy statement the Peoria-based company filed with regulators today," Crain's reported last year.

He laid off an awful lot of workers to make that target.

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Memory, Transitional Justice, And Theatre In Postdictatorship Argentina
"Drawing on contemporary research in memory studies and transitional justice, Montez examines the Argentine theatre's responses to the country's transitional justice policies - truth and reconciliation hearings, trials, amnesties and pardons, and memorial events and spaces - that have taken place in the last decade of the 20th century and the first two decades of the 21st century."

Background:

"The 'Dirty War' was part of Operation Condor, for which the United States government provided technical support and supplied military aid to during the Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations.

"The Dirty War involved state terrorism in Argentina and elsewhere in the Southern Cone against political dissidents, with military and security forces employing urban and rural violence against left-wing guerrillas, political dissidents, and anyone believed to be associated with socialism or somehow contrary to the neoliberal economic policies of the regime.

"Victims of the violence in Argentina alone included an estimated 15,000 to 30,000 left-wing activists and militants, including trade unionists, students, journalists, Marxists, Peronist guerrillas and alleged sympathizers.

"The guerrillas, whose number of victims are nearly 500-540 between military and police officials and up to 230 civilians were already inactive in 1976, so instead of a war the actual situation was a genocide practiced by the Junta over the civilian population.

"Declassified documents of the Chilean secret police cite an official estimate by the Batallon de Inteligencia 601 of 22,000 killed or 'disappeared' between 1975 and mid-1978.

"During this period, in which it was later revealed 8,625 'disappeared' in the form of PEN (Poder Ejecutivo Nacional, anglicized as "National Executive Power") detainees who were held in clandestine detention camps throughout Argentina before eventually being freed under diplomatic pressure.

"The number of people believed to have been killed or 'disappeared,' depending on the source, range from 9,089 to 30,000 in the period from 1976 to 1983, when the military was forced from power following Argentina's defeat in the Falklands War.

"The National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons estimates that around 13,000 were disappeared."

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BeachBook

The Tribune Credited Mussolini With Saving Italy From The Left.

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100 Million Americans Live In Areas Where Every Single ISP Has Admitted Violating Net Neutrality.

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The U.S. Military's Targeting System Is Broken, Meaning We're Killing A Shit-Ton Of Civilians, Creating A Shit-Ton Of Folks Who Want Revenge, And Who Can Blame Them, We'd Want Revenge Too.

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Larry Johnson Can't Remember Two Of His NFL Seasons.

Neither can I, but no, it's not a joking matter, it's deadly serious, don't come @ me.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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*

Uh-oh. This move is in response to a probation report about Hastert's recent behavior.

*

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Authenticated.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:38 AM | Permalink

Memory, Transitional Justice, And Theatre In Postdictatorship Argentina

Author Noe Montez considers how theatre, as a site of activism, produces memory narratives that change public reception to a government's transitional justice policies.

Drawing on contemporary research in memory studies and transitional justice, Montez examines the Argentine theatre's responses to the country's transitional justice policies - truth and reconciliation hearings, trials, amnesties and pardons, and memorial events and spaces - that have taken place in the last decade of the 20th century and the first two decades of the 21st century.

memorybook.jpg

Montez explores how the sociohistorical phenomenon of the Teatroxlaidentidad - an annual showcase staged with the support of Argentina's Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo - acted as a vehicle for drawing attention to the hundreds of children kidnapped from their families during the dictatorship and looks at why the memory narratives regarding the Malvinas Islands (also known as the Falklands) range from ideological appropriations of the islands, to absurdist commentaries about the failed war that signaled the dictatorship's end, to the islands' heavily contested status today.

Memory, Transitional Justice, and Theatre in Postdictatorship Argentina explores the vibrant role of theatrical engagement in postdictatorship Argentina, analyzes plays by artists long neglected in English-language articles and books, and explores the practicalities of staging performances in Latin America.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:53 AM | Permalink

Leaked Documents Expose How Corporations Use Spies to Subvert Political Movements Worldwide

That governments deploy undercover law enforcement officers to infiltrate, gather information on, and subvert protest movements has long been common knowledge. Less well-known, however, is the extent to which some of the world's most profitable businesses have hired private spies to keep tabs on political movements they perceive as a threat to their power and profits.

Hundreds of pages of newly leaked documents - reported on for the first time Tuesday by the Guardian and the Bureau of Investigative Journalism - provide an unprecedented glimpse into this mysterious world of "corporate spies," who have been hired by major companies like the German carmaker Porsche, the U.S.-based manufacturing giant Caterpillar, and the Royal Bank of Scotland, to monitor anti-war demonstrations, protests against the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories, and environmental campaigns against the destruction of the planet.

"The leaked documents suggest the use of secretive corporate security firms to gather intelligence about political campaigners has been widespread," report the Guardian's Rob Evans and Meirion Jones.

Despite this fact - and despite claims by police that corporate spies embedded in protest movements frequently outnumber undercover law enforcement officers - these private firms face "little or no regulation."

And while these "security" companies have attempted to fashion themselves as run-of-the-mill service providers, they are in reality quite different.

"One key distinguishing factor is that corporate investigation firms are often staffed and run by former spies and veterans of special forces, even if they work alongside graduates, accountants and lawyers," TBIJ notes. "Some of the companies even have private military arms."

Speaking anonymously to the Guardian, a man who claims he personally infiltrated political groups for a corporate spy firm said that his work involved more than merely collecting information on protesters.

"He described how the spies surreptitiously fostered conflicts within a campaign to set activists against each other, in order to wear them down and make them lose their political motivation," the Guardian reports.

One of the companies featured heavily in the cache of documents is the private security firm C2i International, which has deployed spies on behalf of Porsche and other major companies to infiltrate groups of environmentalists and anti-Iraq war campaigners.

According to the Guardian, "documents show that C2i claimed it had 'real-time intelligence assets' in a range of environmental campaigns including Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, local green groups in Oxford and 'all anti‐aviation groups.'"

In 2008, C2i also "pitched its services to Donald Trump's property development firm, which was seeking to create a huge golf course and build a hotel and flats on ecologically sensitive land in Scotland." C2i reportedly warned Trump that his company was "under threat from a consortium of environmental activists," but it is unclear whether Trump took C2i up on its offer.

In one case exposed by the leaked documents, C2i - hired by Caterpillar - spied on the family of Rachel Corrie, who was crushed to death by an Israeli military bulldozer in 2003 while protesting the destruction of Palestinian homes. The bulldozer was manufactured and sold to the Israeli military by Caterpillar.

As the Guardian reports, "Corrie's family took legal action against Caterpillar, alleging that the firm was complicit in war crimes by exporting bulldozers to the Israelis knowing that they would be used to demolish Palestinian homes."

Just days after U.S. judges dismissed the lawsuit, Corrie's mother spoke to members of the campaign supporting the family's legal action on a conference call. C2i appears to have listened in on the call and obtained the campaign's notes pertaining to the conversation.

After learning that her conversation was infiltrated by private spies, Corrie's mother Cindy told the Guardian that it is "really distasteful" that corporate operatives would lie about their identities to listen to a conversation she believed only consisted of supporters.

Reacting to the newly leaked trove of documents, author and environmentalist Naomi Klein - who has written extensively on the exploits of corporate contractors - argued that given the enormous human and environmental abuses global corporations have committed, it is not surprising that they would hire spies to monitor those who threaten to expose their criminality.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:50 AM | Permalink

Public Lands Matter

For anyone who cares about protecting public lands, the Trump administration's recent announcement that it is reducing the size of two national monuments in Utah by some two million acres is disappointing, depressing and disastrous. This is the largest rollback of federal land protection in the nation's history.

Just a year ago, on Dec. 28, 2016, President Barack Obama had established the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, reserving approximately 1.35 million acres of federal lands for the care and management of objects of historic and scientific interest identified therein.

Utah may feel like it is far away, but we have our own public lands in Cook County. They're called the Forest Preserves and we have nearly 70,000 acres of these precious, protected lands.

My earliest experiences in the preserves were attending the annual corporate picnic of my father's company. Every August we would pile into the car and ride out to the Dan Ryan Woods. I remember the long, hot afternoon playing in the picnic grove and exploring the trail. But not too far, as my parents wanted to keep an eye on me.

This is a common South Side city kid's memory, going to the Preserves once a year and only knowing one Preserve site. I didn't know what I know now - that the Preserves spread across the width and breadth of Cook County, offering camping, fishing, hiking, biking, exploring and even ziplining experiences for all who desire.

The Preserves contribute so much to our health and well-being. Ringing the western suburbs, they are a green buffer, cleaning our urban air and filtering our water system. They are a place where we can go "forest bathing," a Japanese practice that has taken hold in the United States. Forest bathers unplug from the noise, distraction and pull of the virtual world by sitting still and paying attention in a natural setting. I encourage you to visit a preserve and try it sometime.

Whether it's your favorite forest preserve - Thatcher Woods in River Forest or Linne Woods in Morton Grove - or a national monument like Bears Ears, public lands matter. They were designated to be protected for a reason. It's up to us as citizens and good stewards to continue to advocate for the preservation of public lands. I urge you to consider making that part of your new year resolution for the good of everyone.

Shelley A. Davis is the president of the Forest Preserve Foundation. Links were chosen and added by Beachwood.

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See also: Learn About The Cook County Forest Preserves' 600 Archaeological Sites!

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:44 AM | Permalink

December 12, 2017

Why Was This Game Even Scheduled?

It was 55-8 at halftime.

"We don't often write first-half recaps on this here blog because, well, one half of basketball isn't worth its own story, especially when the people who care are watching the game anyway," Russell Steinberg wrote for SBNation.

"We're making an exception today. Northwestern currently leads Chicago State 55-8 at the half. 55-8. Fifty-five to eight.

"Chicago State, a university that is clinging to life, is one of the worst teams in Division I. The Cougars came into the game ranked 343rd out of 351 teams in KenPom, don't own a win over a Division I opponent, and are projected to finish the season 4-27."


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Comments welcome.

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1. From Jeremy Mullman:

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:12 PM | Permalink

The [Tuesday] Papers

NOTE: The home page is busted somehow. Working on it. You can still access this column here (you'll have to copy and paste, links on the home page aren't working right now): http://www.beachwoodreporter.com/column/the_tuesday_papers_589.php. Through that page, where links are working, you can still access the rest of the site in the usual way.

Fixed, thanks to the fine folk at Hosting Matters, who once again went above and beyond. I highly recommend them, if you're looking for a host. After our early years with hosts that gave us all sorts of problems, Hosting Matters has been stalwart. I can't express my appreciation for them enough.

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Meanwhile . . .

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New on the Beachwood . . .

The Political Odds
Updated to reflect recent developments.

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The Weekend In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Marked Men, Skip Church, Daylight Robbery, The Jesus Lizard, Chicago Farmer, Steel Panther, The Weeks, The Joe Marcinek Band, The Low Down Brass Band, Dispatch, Needtobreathe, Iron Chic, and The White Buffalo.

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All Is Not Forgiven, Bears
One win against a bereft team does not a job save.

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SportsMonday: Blackhawks Smell A Little
But they don't stink.

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Deerfield Company's IV Bag Shortage
Blame Baxter's tax breaks.

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More College Financial Aid Going To The Rich
Students who don't need the money keep getting more of it..

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Low-Wage Immigrant Women Call Out Workplace Sexual Harassment
While celebrities, elected officials, and heads of corporations remain in the headlines, low-wage workers - especially women of color and immigrants - remain on the frontlines of sexual harassment and abuse at work.

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An Odd Call From Bermuda
The latest from the Paradise Papers. Plus: A state bank raid in Brussels, and the mystery of Luxembourg

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Beachwood Sports Radio: Bears At Peak McCaskey
John Fox still coach, Ryan Pace still MIA, undeserving mediocre family still in charge. Plus: Cubs Stove League; The Loyola Ramblers Exist!; Coming Soon: The Niko Mirotic Story; Blackhawks Flat As A Pancake; Mystery Soccer Stadium; and Music City, Schmusic City Bowl.

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The Week In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Tom Kiefer, Cornell Thigpen, Jay-Z, Blue Dream, Thrice, Circa Survive, MR 666, Ethers, The Love Birds, Negative Scanner, Self Hate, Ledge, The Wild & Hungry, Jodee Lewis, and Jana Rush.

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The Turning Points Of The Civil War
The assassination of Abraham Lincoln might have been the war's final turning point.

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Cricket vs. Brexit
Slow news week.

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ChicagoGram

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ChicagoTube

Soviet Art at the Art Institute.

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BeachBook
A sampling.

Poster Child For Estate Tax Repeal's Story Doesn't Add Up.

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8 Maps That Tell The Story Of The Great Lakes.

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The White Supremacist Origins Of A Bedrock Libertarian Principle.

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The Senate Tax Bill Targets Housing For Artists.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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Thread.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Settle down, Beavis.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:24 AM | Permalink

December 11, 2017

The Weekend In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Marked Men at the Empty Bottle on Friday night.


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2. Skip Church at the Empty Bottle on Friday night.

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3. Daylight Robbery at the Empty Bottle on Friday night.

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4. The Jesus Lizard at the Metro on Saturday night.

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5. Chicago Farmer at Uncommon Ground on Thursday night.

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6. Steel Panther at the House of Blues on Friday night.

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7. The Weeks at Lincoln Hall on Friday night.

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8. The Joe Marcinek Band at Martyrs' on Saturday night.

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9. The Low Down Brass Band at Subterranean on Friday night.

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10. Dispatch at Lincoln Hall on Saturday night.

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11. Needtobreathe at Thalia Hall on Saturday night.

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Catching up with . . .

Iron Chic at Subterranean on December 1st.

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The White Buffalo at the Bottom Lounge on December 2nd.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:55 PM | Permalink

Cricket vs. Brexit

Slow news week.


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Previously in Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter!:

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Explains The Economy.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! It's Shit Crap News, Tim.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Is Going To Paris.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Grow Some Balls; Tell The Truth.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! MP Is A Wanker Santa.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Merry Fucking Christmas.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! New Year's Rant.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Sexy Skype.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! TTIP Is Boring Shit.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Truth About Teachers & Doctors.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Valentine's Day 2016.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! On The 'Environment" Beat.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Political Theater As News.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Charter Wankers International.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Panama Papers: They're All In It Together.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Answer The Fucking Question.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Snapchatting The Environment.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Election Fever!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Day-Glo Fuck-Nugget Trump.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Dickens Meets The Jetsons.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Tony Blair: Comedy Genius Or Psychopath?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! What Real Business News Should Look Like.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Facts Are No Longer Newsworthy.

* Pie's Brexit.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Real Life Is Not Game Of Thrones.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Labor: The Clue's In The Title!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Pie Olympics.

* Occupy Pie.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Where Is The War Against Terrorble Mental Health Services?

* Progressive Pie.

* The BBC's Bake-Off Bollocks.

* Pie Commits A Hate Crime.

* Pie Interviews A Teenage Conservative.

* Jonathan Pie's Idiot's Guide To The U.S. Election.

* President Trump: How & Why.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! All The News Is Fake!

* Happy Christmas From Jonathan Pie.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! 2016 In Review.

* Inauguration Reporting.

* New Year: New Pie?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Make The Air Fair.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! A Gift To Trump?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Strong And Unstable.

* Pie & Brand: Hate, Anger, Violence & Carrying On.

* Socialism Strikes Back!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Election Carnage.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Papering Over Poverty.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Queen's Speech.

* Showdown: North Korea vs. Trump.

* Time For The Royal Scroungers To Earn Their Keep.

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Plus:

If Only All TV Reporters Did The News Like This.

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And:

Australia Is Horrific.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:39 PM | Permalink

IV Bag Shortage Stretches On After Hurricane Maria

One impact of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico may continue to plague hospitals in the mainland United States for quite some time. The island United States commonwealth hosts a significant concentration of manufacturing facilities that make medical supplies and pharmaceuticals, lured to the Caribbean island over the years by tax breaks.

The American healthcare system as a whole particularly depends on IV bags made in Puerto Rico by a Deerfield company called Baxter International. Without this important product, procedures from restoring fluids to administering painkillers suddenly become more complicated, creating a logistical strain that can spiderweb across an entire hospital's operations.

han-health-medicalsupply-supplychain-hurricanemaria-puertorico-iv-wisconsin.jpgWisconson Public Television

Puerto Rico remains devastated amid a slow recovery, with a likely death toll far higher than official estimates. Its pharmaceutical industry isn't operating at its previous capacity, and getting supplies to the mainland is difficult as well.

But this crisis isn't just a one-time problem. Medical manufacturers, healthcare providers and government regulators do not coordinate the flow of vital supplies or have a comprehensive way to get ahead of drug or equipment shortages. Officials at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration don't have a thorough grasp on what medical supplies are made where, which could make it difficult to anticipate when a natural disaster or other emergency could disrupt manufacturers concentrated in a given geographic area.

Whether a given company makes a given product, and how much it makes, can be subject to volatile market forces. If only one company is making an important drug and it goes out of business or decides to focus on more profitable product, it could leave hospitals around the country scrambling to figure out alternatives. As troublesome as the Puerto Rico situation is for pharmacy buyers, they're becoming accustomed to dealing with increasingly frequent drug and medical supply shortages.

The IV bag shortage has, for example, created trouble for Wisconsin hospitals large and small. The main University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics campus in Madison goes through thousands of Baxter's mini-bag systems per day. Nearly three months after Hurricane Maria's landfall in Puerto Rico, the IV bag shortage is still putting a strain on the hospital, as UW Health manager of patient care services Phillip Trapskin explained in a Dec. 8, 2017 interview with Wisconsin Public Television's Here & Now.

Earlier the same day, Trapskin joined a group of other healthcare professionals in Washington, D.C. to discuss drug shortages with the staffs of Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan. Their trip followed up on a letter the American Hospital Association and other medical groups sent to Congress in November that Hurricane Maria and other natural disasters' impact on medical manufacturing "now leave the U.S. healthcare system on the brink of a significant public health crisis."

"I think the hurricane shed some light on vulnerabilities that exist within our supply chain within health care," Trapskin told Here & Now.

UW Health has been working to line up other sources of IV bags and implement workarounds for common procedures that usually depended on this product. "Luckily, no adverse outcomes have happened with patients at UW. We've been able to provide all the medications we need. But it does put strain on the system in terms of opportunities for medication errors when you quickly implement new workflows," he added.

In the short term, Trapskin fears things might actually get worse. Around the end of the year, medical manufacturers usually slow down or stop production in order to carry out routine maintenance on their factories. At the same time, cold and flu season are ramping up, creating more demand for the very products of those facilities.

"We're actually nervous given the way the fluids exist today," he said.

Over the long run, Trapskin advocates for building more consistency and communication into what is now a fragmented supply chain, in which the supply of life-saving drugs or equipment can hinge on the whims of the market or the decision-making of an individual company. Trapskin proposes that policymakers create incentives for companies to produce critical medical supplies like antibiotics, IV fluids and equipment for resuscitating cardiac-arrest victims, and at high enough levels that healthcare providers around the nation can be assured of a consistent supply.

As it is now, pharmaceutical companies don't often have those incentives from the market, especially if a drug's price is fluctuating, or if that drug is an inexpensive generic. In both a physical sense and a logistical sense, Trapskin summed it up as an infrastructure problem.

"Players come in and out of the market and don't always maintain their factories as well as they could," he said.

This post was originally published on WisContext, which produced it in a partnership between Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Public Television and Cooperative Extension.

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Previously: Hurricane Maria Exacerbates Medical Supply Shortages.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:17 PM | Permalink

Turning Points Of The Civil War

Contributors to this collection - public historians with experience at Civil War battle sites - examine key shifts in the Civil War and the context surrounding them to show that many chains of events caused the course of the war to change: the Federal defeats at First Bull Run and Ball's Bluff, the wounding of Joseph Johnston at Seven Pines and the Confederate victory at Chancellorsville, the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Federal victory at Vicksburg, Grant's decision to move on to Richmond rather than retreat from the Wilderness, the naming of John B. Hood as commander of the Army of Tennessee, and the 1864 presidential election.

In their conclusion, the editors suggest that the assassination of Abraham Lincoln might have been the war's final turning point.

turningpoints.jpg

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:45 PM | Permalink

The Paradise Papers: An Odd Call From The Bermuda Government

Dear Steve,

This week our reporter Will Fitzgibbon offers a bit of insight into what it's like being an investigative reporter on the Paradise Papers. Will, along with several of ICIJ's partners, traveled to Bermuda in the months leading up to our project release. But he received a bizarre phone call when he returned to D.C.

willparadise.jpg

On a more serious note, many were left asking "Where is Luxembourg?" after the European Parliament finally released their tax haven blacklist last week. The list included places like Panama and Barbados but still left many scratching their heads over European omissions.

Still in Europe, the effects of the earlier Panama Papers project - some 18 months after publication - are still having an impact with a state bank raided in Brussels.

Stay tuned for more this week. We'll be back in your inbox a bit sooner than normal!

Amy Wilson-Chapman
ICIJ's Community Engagement Editor

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Previously in the Paradise Papers:
* 'Paradise Papers' Reveal Tax Avoidance, Shady Dealings Of World's Rich And Powerful.

* Just How Much Money Is Held Offshore? Hint: A SHIT-TON.

* Development Dreams Lost In The Offshore World.

* Keeping Offshore 'Hush Hush,' But Why?

* Tax Havens Are Alive With The Sound Of Music.

* Today In Tax Avoidance Of The Ultra-Wealthy.

* Go To Town With This Offshore Leaks Database.

* The Paradise Papers: The View From Africa And Asia.

* The Paradise Papers: The End Of Elusion For PokerStars.

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Previously in the Panama Papers:
* The Panama Papers: Remarkable Global Media Collaboration Cracks Walls Of Offshore Tax Haven Secrecy.

* The Panama Papers: Prosecutors Open Probes.

* The [Monday] Papers.

* Adventures In Tax Avoidance.

* Mossack Fonseca's Oligarchs, Dictators And Corrupt White-Collar Businessmen.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! They're All In It Together.

* Meet The Panama Papers Editor Who Handled 376 Reporters In 80 Countries.

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Previously in tax scammage:
* Deepwater Horizon Settlement Comes With $5.35 Billion Tax Windfall.

* Offshoring By 29 Companies Costs Illinois $1.2 Billion Annually.

* Government Agencies Allow Corporations To Write Off Billions In Federal Settlements.

* The Gang Of 62 Vs. The World.

* How The Maker Of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing.

* $1.4 Trillion: Oxfam Exposes The Great Offshore Tax Scam Of U.S. Companies.

* How Barclay's Turned A $10 Billion Profit Into A Tax Loss.

* Wall Street Stock Loans Drain $1 Billion A Year From German Taxpayers.

* German Finance Minister Cries Foul Over Tax Avoidance Deals.

* Prosecutor Targets Commerzbank For Deals That Dodge German Taxes.

* A Schlupfloch Here, A Schlupfloch There. Now It's Real Money.

* How Milwaukee Landlords Avoid Taxes.

* Study: 32 Illinois Fortune 500 Companies Holding At Least $147 Billion Offshore.

* Watch Out For The Coming Tax Break Trickery.

* When A 'Tax Bonanza' Is Actually A Huge Corporate Tax Break.

* The Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump.

* Oxfam Names World's Worst Tax Havens Fueling 'Global Race To Bottom.'

* Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Illinois Small Business $5,789 A Year.

* State Tax Incentives To Corporations Don't Work.

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Previously in carried interest, aka The Billionaire's Loophole:
* Patriotic Millionaires Vs. Carried Interest.

* The Somewhat Surreal Politics Of A Private Equity Tax Loophole Costing Us Billions (That Obama Refused To Close Despite Pledging To Do So).

* Fact-Checking Trump & Clinton On The Billionaire's Tax Break.

* Despite Trump Campaign Promise, Billionaires' Tax Loophole Survives Again.

* Carried Interest Reform Is a Sham.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:09 PM | Permalink

SportsMonday: The Blackhawks Smell A Little

At this point, about all I can say is the Hawks don't stink.

They also aren't good but at least a fan doesn't automatically think of them when they catch a whiff of the areas where hockey players change, which are known for being even more pungent than the average locker room.

The Blackhawks finally played a decent period (the third) in the middle of their easiest schedule stretch of the season and that enabled them to knock off the Arizona Coyotes 3-1 on Sunday night. On Friday they rallied to barely edge the Buffalo Sabres 3-2 on an overtime goal with :04.9 remaining.

And just like that, the Hawks have combined with the Bears and the Bulls for a five-game local winning streak after the group lost 20 in a row together (Bulls 10, Bears 5 and Hawks 5).

In the first two time frames at the United Center last night and just about throughout their victory on Friday, the team continued its lousy play of the last couple weeks.

And then last night the Hawks could barely complete a pass during the first period and weren't much better in the second. Finally, with a dozen minutes remaining, the Hawks broke through. And it was the fourth line that led them, again.

Tommy Wingels scored his second huge goal in as many games to put the Blackhawks on the board.

And after the Coyotes scored what could have been a demoralizing goal a few minutes later, Patrick Kane finally got untracked.

The leading scorer who had not scored even an assist in the previous four games first found Hawks leading scorer Artem Anisimov for a deadly wrister.

Then he worked a perfect 2-on-1 with Nick Schmaltz, culminating in a one-timer that put the game away.

Schmaltz is a guy who has shown real potential as a playmaker so far this year. He is one of the young players who will have to come through if the Blackhawks are to avoid falling off a cliff (in the standings) as the championship core (Kane, Jonathan Toews, Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook) ages.

Kane's scoring plays were especially welcome because in these last half-dozen games or so, the Hawks' fourth line, led by Wingels and Peter Bouma, has been more dangerous offensively than their first (the one that features Kane of course). And don't get me started about Toews and Brandon Saad. Actually, do get me started.

Saad has been a flat-out bust so far this year, making fans pine for the little-big gun, i.e. Artemi Panarin, who was sent to Columbus to make Saad's second time around with the Hawks possible. The big winger does a good job of taking care of his defensive responsibilities, but the hoped-for offensive chemistry with Toews has not happened - at all.

And so the Hawks find themselves sixth in their division even after winning a couple games in a row. It is nothing a little winning streak can't fix, but that isn't going to happen if the team doesn't find a way to raise its game, and soon.

The bright side is the team's young defensemen, Jan Rutta and Gustav Forsling. The latter almost single-handedly saved the Hawks from what would have been an embarrassing loss to the Sabres, who have totaled all of seven wins this season.

First, with just under 3:30 remaining in regulation and shorthanded, he sent a shot-pass toward Wingels that the forward tipped into the net to draw the Hawks even.

Then in overtime, Forsling expertly waited until the Sabres goaltender was screened before firing the game-winner between his legs.

Next up for the Hawks are the weak Florida Panthers on Tuesday evening. Then they have to start playing real teams again. You should be able to tell if they are playing better by paying attention to the smell.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:35 AM | Permalink

All Is Not Forgiven, John Fox & Co.

"The last time the Bears were victorious was the same week the Cubs last won a game, and if that feels like a long time ago, it's because it was," Barry Rozner writes for the Daily Herald.

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"Forget the Bears' lost season for just a moment and keep in mind that all that matters is that whether rookie Mitchell Trubisky is good at quarterback," Dan Bernstein of The Score writes.

"If he is, everything is fine for general manager Ryan Pace and whomever the new coach may be after this slog is over."

NO. This narrative is aggravating. For Trubisky to have been worth the draft picks Pace gave up to get him, he has to be way better than, say, Deshaun Watson and the rest of the 2017 quarterback cohort.

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"[Kendall] Wright revealed the [receiving] corps calls itself 7-Eleven because 'we're always open,'" David Haugh writes for the Tribune.

But they're not! More like a store that's only open one day a year! C'mon!

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To Bears - and Bengals - Twitter.

Is this good or bad? What is the league average? Stats are frequently meaningless unless they are compared to something.

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I'm no Bears defender, but maybe this is "progress," "development" or "Bengals."

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But I thought they had to establish the run? #CompetingConvenientNarratives

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Not really.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:05 AM | Permalink

December 9, 2017

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Tom Kiefer at the Forge in Joliet on Thursday night.


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2. Cornell Thigpen at the Promontory on Sunday night.

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3. Jay-Z at the Blackhawks arena on Tuesday night.

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4. Blue Dream at Schubas on Thursday night.

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5. Thrice at the Aragon on Thursday night.

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6. Circa Survive at the Aragon on Thursday night.

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7. MR 666 at Danny's on Tuesday night.

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Catching up with . . .

Ethers at the Hideout on December 1st.

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The Love Birds at the Hideout on December 1st.

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Negative Scanner at the Hideout on December 1st.

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Self Hate at the Cobra Lounge on December 1st.

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Ledge at the Cobra Lounge on December 1st.

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The Wild & Hungry at Livewire on December 2nd.

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Jodee Lewis at Wishbone on December 2nd.

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Jana Rush at the Hideout on December 2nd.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:35 PM | Permalink

December 8, 2017

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #178: Bears At Peak McCaskey

John Fox still coach, Ryan Pace still MIA, undeserving mediocre family still in charge. Plus: Cubs Stove League; The Loyola Ramblers Exist!; Coming Soon: The Niko Mirotic Story; Blackhawks Flat As A Pancake; Mystery Soccer Stadium; and Music City, Schmusic City Bowl.


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SHOW NOTES

* 178.

1:00: Cubs Stove League.

* Theotani.

* Levine: Decision To Come Monday.

* Haugh: Caution Makes Sense When Predicting Stardom For Cubs Target Shohei Ohtani.

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BREAKING: BOY WAS I WRONG!

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* Kyle Schwarber Looks Much Slimmer This Offseason.

* Cubs Agree To 3-Year Deal With Tyler Chatwood Worth $38M.

* Jesse Rogers: Why The Cubs Shouldn't Make A Blockbuster Trade For A Starting Pitcher.

* Rondon out, Grimm in.

* Alex Avila!

29:19: John Fox Is Still The Bears' Coach!!!

* The McCaskey Way!

* Dickerson: Does Ryan Pace's Draft History Bode Well For Bears' Future?

* Ryan Pace, MIA.

45:08: The Loyola Ramblers Exist!

* Porter Moser.

* Northwestern a bust, DePaul horrible.

49:37: Coming Soon: The Niko Mirotic Story.

* Rated "R" for Riiiiiiiiiiiight.

51:49: Blackhawks Flat As A Pancake.

* Bernstein: Life Without Corey No Fun.

56:00: Mystery Soccer Stadium.

57:58: Music City, Schmusic City Bowl.

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STOPPAGE: 1:44

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For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:17 PM | Permalink

More College Financial Aid Going To The Rich

Maya Portillo started life solidly in the middle class. Both her parents were college graduates, they sent her to a Montessori school, they took family vacations and they owned a house in Tucson filled with the books she loved to read.

Then, when she was 10, Portillo's father left, the house was foreclosed on and the recession hit. Her mother was laid off, fell into debt and took Portillo and her two sisters to live a hand-to-mouth existence with their grandparents in Indiana.

"It could have happened to anyone," said Portillo, who took two jobs after school to pitch in while trying to maintain her grades. "I can't even begin to describe how hard it was."

She choked up. "It's really hard to talk about, but when you have to help put food on the table when you're in high school, it does something to you."

Portillo recounted this story in a quiet conference room on the pristine hilltop campus of Cornell University, from which she was about to graduate with a major in industrial labor relations and minors in education and equality studies.

Her long path from comfort to poverty to an against-the-odds Ivy League degree gave her firsthand exposure to how even the smartest low-income students often succeed despite, rather than because of, programs widely assumed to help them go to college.

This is happening as tens of billions of dollars of taxpayer-funded and privately provided financial aid, along with money universities and colleges dole out directly, flows to their higher-income classmates.

"There is a very seriously warped view among many Americans, and particularly more affluent Americans, about where the money is actually going," said Richard Reeves, a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution and author of Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust.

"They say, look, there's always other support going to poorer kids," Reeves said. "Well, there isn't. There actually isn't. But the ignorance about where the money is actually going and who benefits from it, that ignorance is really an obstacle to reform around what is in fact a reverse distribution."

It's a little-known reality that reflects - and, since higher education is a principal route to the middle class, widens - the American income divide. And, at the same time that the fight over issues including health care and changes in tax law has reignited the national debate over income inequality, financial aid disparities are getting worse, driven by politics, the pursuit of prestige and policies that have been shifting resources away from students with financial need.

The result? "We're not helping the right people go to college as much as we should," said Ron Ehrenberg, a Cornell economist and director of the university's Higher Education Research Institute.

mayaportillo.jpgMaya Portillo at the New York City lab where she studies how children from different socioeconomic backgrounds develop language skills. In a system that benefits her wealthier classmates to a surprising degree, Portillo was one of a small number of low-income students who managed to enroll at and graduate from Cornell University. Jackie Mader/The Hechinger Report

* * * * *

At least 86,000 more low-income students per year are qualified to attend the most selective universities and colleges than enroll, according to a study by the Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce. On standardized admissions tests, these students score as well as or better than those who do get that privilege.

It's not because selective institutions can't afford to help low-income students, the Georgetown study said. The 69 most prestigious universities boast endowments averaging $1.2 billion and posted typical annual budget surpluses of $139 million from 2012 to 2015, the most recent year for which the figures are available.

Cornell has a $6.8 billion endowment and took in $390 million a year more than it spent during that time, the study said. Yet federal data show that only 15 percent of its students are low-income, based on whether they qualify for a federal Pell grant. Nationally, 33 percent of all students are low-income by this measure, the College Board reports.

Children of parents in the top 1 percent of earnings are 77 times more likely to go to an Ivy League college than those whose parents are in the bottom 20 percent, a National Bureau of Education Research study found. "Polishing the privileged," one policymaker calls this.

But it's not just Ivy League or even private institutions where the percentages of less well-off students are low. Some taxpayer-supported public universities enroll very small proportions of them. Only 12 percent of students at the University of Virginia, for example, come from families with incomes low enough to qualify for Pell grants, federal data show.

It's not because there aren't plenty of low-income students who qualify, research by the Institute for Higher Education Policy found. Only 15 percent of the students at Pennsylvania State University's main campus, for example, are low-income, but the study showed that twice that proportion would meet admissions requirements, meaning Penn State could graduate 900 more lower-income students per year.

If such a change was made by all the universities and colleges that now take fewer lower-income students than they could, the report concluded, 57,500 more low-income students per year would be earning degrees.

"When you look at the way that higher education is financed, subsidized and organized in the United States, your heart sinks just a bit further," Reeves said. "It takes the inequalities given to it and makes them worse."

Even low-income students with the highest scores on 10th-grade standardized tests are more than three times less likely to go to top colleges than higher-income students, according to the Education Trust. More than a fifth of those high-achieving low-income students never go to college at all, while nearly all of their wealthier counterparts do.

In some cases that's because low-income prospects are discouraged by the cost. It's a legitimate worry. Even though - as institutions argue - low-income students may in fact be eligible for financial aid they're not aware of, that money seldom covers the full price of their educations or enough of it that they could afford the rest. Portillo, for example, got comparatively generous help, but still had to pay $3,500 a year she didn't have, plus other expenses, such as mandatory health insurance.

"For someone like me, $3,500 is everything," she said. "It's a lot of money." So she borrowed $21,000 over the course of her education, which she'll have to repay out of her salary working at a New York City charter school for low-income students. "Oof," she said, thinking about the day her loans come due. "I'm not coming out of here debt-free, as they kind of market themselves."

Students who don't need the money, meanwhile, keep getting more of it. At private universities, students from families with annual earnings of $155,000-plus receive an average of $5,800 more per year in financial aid than a federal formula says they need to pay tuition; at public universities, they get $1,810 more than they need, according to the College Board.

* * * * *

Here's where the money goes that you think helps poor students pay for college.

  • Private colleges give students from families with annual incomes of $155,000+ an average of $5,800 more per year in financial aid than a federal formula says they need to pay tuition; at public universities, they get $1,810 more than they need.
  • 529 college savings accounts allow for $2 billion worth of federal and at least $265 million worth of state tax breaks that almost all go to upper-income families.
  • Federal tuition tax credits cost the treasury $35 billion. More than a fifth of the money under the principal deduction goes to families earning $100,000 to $180,000 a year.
  • A student at a private university from a family in the top quarter of income is more likely to get work-study money than a student at a community college from the bottom quarter.
  • State "free-college" programs often benefit wealthier students more than lower-income ones. In Oregon, which made community college free, students from families in the top 40 percent of income got 60 percent of the benefit.

SOURCES: The College Board; U.S. Department of the Treasury Office of Tax Analysis (federal) and the Brookings Institution (state); Pew Charitable Trusts and Congressional Research Service; Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment; The College Board; Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission

* * * * *

College is expensive even for the wealthiest of families, of course, and even more so if they have children close to each other in age or live in places with high costs of living, Ehrenberg said. But those are families whose kids would "absolutely" go to college without such help, he said.

This system has evolved because, with enrollment in decline, colleges and universities are vying for a shrinking supply of students - especially for students whose parents can pay at least some of the tuition - who they lure by offering discounts and financial aid.

Cornell sophomore Aleks Stajkovic benefitted from that strategy. He got financial aid he said he didn't really need. "I know I'm on a bunch of scholarships and stuff," he said, studying in the atrium of a grand, century-old building on the university's stately arts quadrangle. "It's just like a supplement." He would have been able to afford Cornell without it, Stajkovic said. "For sure. I definitely would have. And that's the sad thing - there's kids that need that."

All of this means that, in spite of promises from policymakers, politicians and colleges themselves to help the least-wealthy students, the net price of a higher education after discounts and financial aid is rising much faster for them than for the wealthiest ones. While higher-income students still pay more overall, federal data shows, since 2012 the net price for the poorest students at Cornell has increased four and a half times faster than for the richest.

Cornell wouldn't talk about these issues. A spokeswoman said no one at the university was available to discuss them at any time over a three-week period.

A mile away at smaller Ithaca College, however - which has one-twentieth as big of an endowment as Cornell but enrolls a larger proportion of low-income undergraduates - student financial services director Lisa Hoskey said all higher education institutions have to deal with the complicated calculus of attracting enough families that can pay to keep their campuses going.

"That balance is always tricky," said Hoskey, the daughter of a factory worker who depended on financial aid herself to go to college. "I know people don't often think that there's a bottom line, but there is. And so do we help more people with less money or do we help less people with more money?"

She said: "If I had my way, if we could meet need, I would absolutely love to do that. We can't."

Wealthier families have now come to expect financial aid, and they negotiate for more - something lower-income ones without college-going experience may not know that they can do - said Hoskey, on whose office wall hang thank-you notes from students she's helped.

"Most people will tell you that financial aid is a privilege for those who earn it - until it becomes their own child, and then it's a right," she said. Parents who understand the mystifying process "try to maximize the benefits that they can receive. And I think some people are more knowledgeable about how to do that."

Portillo gets that. "It's like a business, right?" she said. "I understand where the university is coming from. At the same time, it's difficult, as somebody who is low-income," to pay for college without more help.

Colleges' shifting of some of their financial aid to higher-income students who could kick in toward salaries, facilities and other things means taxpayer-supported government policies are largely left to support low-income ones. But those policies, too, disproportionately help the wealthy, often through hard-to-see tax subsidies.

"These programs do not get at basic public policy issues, which is that if you're a bright kid coming from a relatively low-income family, your chances of enrolling in and eventually completing college are much, much lower than a less-talented student coming from a wealthy family," said Ehrenberg.

It starts with savings. People who set up college-savings accounts, called 529 plans, get $2 billion a year worth of federal tax deductions - projected by the Treasury Department to double by 2026 to $4 billion a year. Yet the department says that almost all of these benefits go to upper-income families that would send their kids to college even without them. Only one in five families earning under $35,000 a year even know about 529 plans, a survey by the investment firm Edward Jones found. States forgo at least an additional $265 million in their own tax breaks for holders of 529 plans, according to the Brookings Institution.

Once they pay for college, Americans are eligible for federal tuition tax breaks. But those breaks also disproportionately benefit higher-income students and have grown to exceed the amount spent annually on Pell grants for lower-income ones. The tax deductions cost the federal government $35 billion a year in forgone revenue, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts. That's 13 times more than in 1990, even when adjusted for inflation.

More than a fifth of the money provided under the principal deduction, the American Opportunity Tax Credit, goes to families earning between $100,000 and $180,000 per year, the Congressional Research Service found. It also found that 93 percent of recipients would have gone to college without it.

Other funding for students is also unequally applied. Portillo earned some cash toward her expenses by getting a work-study job on campus, part of a nearly $1 billion federal financial aid program that pays students for such jobs as shelving library books and busing tables. But because of a more than 50-year-old formula under which work-study money is distributed, it skews to more prestigious private universities with higher-income students.

These schools enroll only 14 percent of undergraduates, but get 38 percent of work-study money, while community colleges - which take almost half of all students, many of them low-income - get just 20 percent, according to the Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment.

A student at a private university from a family in the top quarter of income is more likely to get work-study money than a student at a community college from the bottom quarter.

"Lots of higher education policies are built in a way that would win support from middle- and even upper-income taxpayers and they were not really thought about as, 'Will this really increase the number of people going to college?'" Ehrenberg said. "If I were a social planner we would be using our resources to help support the people who would not be able to go to college."

The Trump administration has proposed cutting spending on work-study nearly in half.

Employer tuition assistance and private scholarships from Rotary clubs and chambers of commerce, too, benefit wealthier people more than poorer ones, who often don't know about the aid or whose schools don't have enough college counselors to help them get it. There is more than $17 billion available annually from such sources, the College Board reports; more than 10 percent goes to families earning $106,000 and up, and about 60 percent to those with incomes above $65,000, the U.S. Department of Education calculates.

States also provide more than $10 billion in financial aid to students, according to the College Board. But as they try to keep top students from moving away, the proportion of that money being given out based on measures other than need has risen from zero, in the early 1980s, to nearly a quarter of state financial aid today.

Experts say that even "free college" in states including New York, where it will eventually be extended, for state schools, to children of families with earnings of up to $125,000, is likely to benefit wealthier students more than lower-income ones. That's because it only kicks in after students have already exhausted all of their other financial aid. Students from higher-earning families who don't qualify for such things as federal Pell Grants will end up getting bigger breaks than lower-income students who do.

In Oregon, which has made community college free, students from families in the top 40 percent of income got 60 percent of the free-tuition money, the state's Higher Education Coordinating Commission found. (Oregon officials have since changed the requirements, disqualifying the wealthiest families from the program.)

Unsurprisingly, given these trends, the proportion of low-income people getting degrees is declining while the proportion of higher-income ones continues to go up. Students from higher-income families today are nearly nine times more likely to earn bachelor's degrees by the time they're 24 than students from lower-income ones, up from about seven times more likely in 1970, according to the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education.

Those low-income students who do make it into college are much more likely to enroll at for-profit universities, where graduation rates are the worst in higher education, or thinly stretched regional public ones. At community colleges, which spend less per student than many public primary and secondary schools, and where the odds of graduating are also comparatively low, about four in 10 of the students are low income, according to the American Association of Community Colleges.

The policies perpetuating this aren't likely to change in the current political climate, experts said.

"The system is in danger of becoming trapped in a kind of horrible anti-egalitarian equilibrium," said Reeves. "I see that getting worse instead of better. The only hope, I think, is if the institutions themselves and the leaders of those institutions - who I think at some level are committed to the ideals of more opportunity - can find a way to alter the equilibrium themselves."

As hard as it was for her to afford, Portillo hugely values her Cornell degree. "I feel so lucky because I know 10 other kids just like me who struggled the same with low socioeconomic status and couldn't get that spot because there aren't enough spots for people like us," she said quietly. "That's not based on how hard they work. It's based on how much money they have. And that is heartbreaking."

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education, in collaboration with the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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Previously:
* Colleges Let Taxpayers Help Poor Students While They Go After Rich.

* Colleges That Pledged To Help Poor Families Have Been Doing The Opposite, New Figures Show.

* Top Universities Could Take Thousands More Low-Income Students, Study Says.

* Another Advantage Of Being Rich In America: Grade Inflation.

* Wealthy Students Pushing Out Low-Income Students At Top Public Universities.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:04 AM | Permalink

December 7, 2017

Low-Wage Immigrant Women Call Out Workplace Sexual Harassment

While celebrities, elected officials, and heads of corporations remain in the headlines, low-wage workers - especially women of color and immigrants - remain on the frontlines of sexual harassment and abuse at work. At the same time, low-wage working women are on the frontlines of organizing for change and fighting back against sexual harassment.

The country in an important cultural moment, with brave women speaking out against men in powerful positions. At the same time, low-wage workers who face high levels of harassment and abuse often remain in the shadows. Arise Chicago and other local and national worker organizations are proud to support low-wage immigrant women and women of color as they speak out against sexual harassment and challenge common power dynamics in the workplace.

To bring to light the stories of women from across low-wage industries, worker members from Arise Chicago created a video on their own experiences of sexual harassment. Arise members shared stories and advice in hopes of reaching other women - to help break societal stigma and fear, and to educate workers on what to do in cases of harassment on the job.

Arise worker leader Martina Sanchez sees the growing outcry from workers as a turning point in the fight against sexual harassment. "There are thousands of women who remain silent out of a variety of fears," says Sanchez. "Fear of what will be said about them, fear of losing their job, or worst of all, fear they won't be listened to and nothing will change. But this moment is the beginning of a new struggle."

Arise Chicago board member and domestic worker leader Isabel Escobar agrees: "This is a very sad time for our country, but also a very important time. A door has opened for more women like me to speak out."

Escobar also emphasized the importance of low-wage workers to speak up, "We want to let people know that this doesn't just happen to famous women," says Escobar. "Abuse is not only committed by famous men in high power positions. Sexual harassment happens every day to low-wage workers, to immigrants, to women of color. And bosses, supervisors, feel they have power over our work, our income. Therefore, many women are afraid to speak up or afraid no one will believe us."

Escobar herself faced multiple instances of sexual harassment as a home cleaner. Yet, she remains determined to make change for herself and other workers. "I encourage other women to speak up," she says. "Nothing will change if we stay quiet. Now is the time to talk. Now is the time to be strong and unite to end sexual harassment at work."

Arise board member, and worker leader Rocio Caravantes who also experienced harassment at work, echoes the sentiment that now is the time for women to act. "If we speak up now, we will be creating a better path forward for the next generation of women workers," says Caravantes.

The video:

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Comments welcome.


Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:31 PM | Permalink

The [Thursday] Papers

Note: The Papers will not appear on Friday. It looks like Monday is a bust, too.

Meanwhile . . .

ChicagoGram

#loganproject #artisticbombingcrew #writersbench #writersbenchchicago #flash_abc #bboybabc #seenabc #logansquare

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

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ChicagoTube

Chicago Bus Stop (Ooh I Love It) / The Salsoul Orchestra

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BeachBook

Researchers Link Acceptance Of Climate Change To Group Identity.

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On This Day . . . Deconstructing Rahm's Mea Culpa.

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ABC Reprimands - But Does Not Fire - Producer For Giving Proprietary Data To Trump Campaign While Polls Still Open.

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Beachwood Holiday Gift Guide Recommendation!

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Oldest Monster Black Hole Ever Found Is 800 Million Times More Massive Than The Sun.

Holy fuck. Our universe is beyond comprehension.

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Yahoo! Sues Mozilla For Discovering It's Search Sucks.

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Super Cool Tree Program At University Of Minnesota.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

He is rubber, you are glue.

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It's the least someone could do.

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Oh, Sneed. The fact that you are still employed - and handsomely compensated - is a pox on journalism and should fill the Sun-Times with shame.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Peak humanity.


Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:35 AM | Permalink

'Taking A Knee' In Trump Country

"A protest of racial injustice highlights divisions in Robeson County, North Carolina, the most diverse rural county in America, where voters also helped Donald Trump win the county and the White House."


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Previously in Colin Kaepernick:

* Don't Be Surprised If Colin Kaepernick Prompts More Schoolchildren To Sit For The Pledge Of Allegiance.

* Why Colin Kaepernick Matters.

* Your Turn: Colin Kaepernick's Protest.

* Youth Football Team (8-Year-Olds) Take Knees In Belleville.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:41 AM | Permalink

December 6, 2017

The [Wednesday] Papers

"The attorneys for the families of two men suing an ex-Chicago cop and the City of Chicago are asking for severe legal sanctions after city attorneys produced a critical disciplinary report against the former cop well into the trial and years after it was requested," the Sun-Times reports.

Here we go again. Just nine days ago:

"A federal judge has ordered the city of Chicago to pay $62,500 for withholding records in a wrongful death lawsuit, marking the eighth time Mayor Rahm Emanuel's administration has been sanctioned for failing to turn over potential evidence in a police misconduct case," the Tribune reports.

"The city agreed to the amount this month after U.S. District Judge Joan Gottschall upheld an earlier ruling that the city acted in 'bad faith' when it ignored a court order and made little effort to provide documents to the lawyer for the family of Divonte Young, 20, who was shot and killed by an officer five years ago."

Back to the current-day Sun-Times:

"Attorneys for the men's families insist the report 'establishes the Code of Silence is alive and well in the Chicago Police Department and has been since the infancy of [the defendant's] employment as a police officer in 1992.' A spokesman for the city's law department did not immediately comment, but city attorneys have apparently said the report fell through the cracks during a transition to a new computer system.

"'This is like, the damning report, and it comes up out of nowhere,' U.S. District Judge Virginia Kendall said Tuesday. 'It's really a mess.'"

Again.

"The city's extremely late turnover of the disciplinary records raises serious questions about how the trial can proceed. It also provides another example of city attorneys failing to provide records to opposing attorneys in police misconduct cases - something that's the city has been criticized or sanctioned for by judges."

*

"Kendall said she'll instruct the jury that they can 'make the inference that the city intentionally withheld' all three documents do to a code of silence," the Tribune reports.

Certainly, then, we can make that inference too.

*

The rest of the case doesn't look good for the city or Chicago Police Department either.

"In reading through the file, Kendall said she was struck by the fact that Frugoli's story about the incident changed over time, including sworn statements before the Police Board that she said were clearly 'embellished.'

"She noted that 'cookie-cutter' police reports documenting the incident appeared to be cleaned up to shield Frugoli and other officers from further allegations of wrongdoing. Among the alterations, she said, were edit marks inserting language that Frugoli was 'escorted' to the police station after his arrest, rather than the initial statements that he'd driven himself."

I highly recommend you go read the rest if you haven't been following this story.

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New on today's Beachwood . . .

The End Of Elusion For PokerStars
How the online gaming company used the offshore world to cater to U.S. players.

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Russian Dopes
The ban on Russia from competing at the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea is not unprecedented, but it is unique: it is directly linked to the country's lack of sporting integrity.

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ChicagoGram

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ChicagoTube

The Future Of Mexican Food In Chicago.

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BeachBook

Taking A Second Look At The Learn-To-Code Craze.

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Media Organizations Support Jamie Kalven's Fight To Protect His Sources In The Laquan McDonald Case.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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For his upcoming campaign, in which he's unopposed.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: O'Rahma.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:52 AM | Permalink

Banning Russia

As the result of a state-sponsored doping regime in the lead-up to and during the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, the International Olympic Committee has banned Russia from participating at next year's games.

Bans from the Olympics are not unprecedented. In the aftermath of the two world wars, certain countries - like Germany and Japan - were not permitted to compete.

Also, the IOC banned South Africa for three decades from the 1960s because of its apartheid regime. Afghanistan was suspended from the Olympics in 1999, partly because of the Taliban's prohibition on the participation of women athletes. It did not send athletes to the 2000 Olympics.

The ban on Russia from competing at next year's Winter Olympics in South Korea is, however, unique: it is directly linked to the country's lack of sporting integrity.

How Might Russia React?

The ban is a humiliating blow to Russian sport generally but also to the country's president, Vladimir Putin. His interest in winter sports was evidenced by Russia spending a record $51 billion on hosting the Olympics in 2014, which surpassed the previous record Beijing set in 2008.

But just one Olympic cycle later, the integrity of that event - at which Russia topped the medal table - has been undermined, and the Russian flag will not fly at the 2018 Games. Russian state TV has already said it will not broadcast from South Korea, where the country's athletes were expected to be medal contenders in one-third of its 102 events.

Aside from Putin's reaction, there are several further points of interest arising from the ban. First, it is likely that Russia will appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Russia appealed its ban from the 2016 Rio Paralympics - it remains banned from the Winter Paralympics - to CAS. This time, expect the appeal to be founded on the due process argument that the reports upon which the IOC's decision is based - the McLaren reports of 2016 and the IOC's Schmid Commission - were investigatory only. While the evidence, at first instance, appears compelling, Russia has yet to test or answer it in an adversarial setting.

Second, the IOC's ban is not a blanket prohibition' the IOC has said that it will allow athletes from Russia to compete under a neutral flag and as "Olympic Athletes from Russia."

Similar to what occurred in the lead-up to the Rio Olympics in 2016 - where a ban on Russia competing was contemplated - the IOC has laid down strict testing criteria which such neutral athletes must satisfy before being declared eligible. Expect multiple CAS appeals to emanate from the IOC's interpretation of criteria.

Echoes And Lessons Of History

CAS appeals may be rendered moot if Russia, as has been hinted, decides that such is the disproportionate, biased nature of the IOC's actions that it will fully boycott the event and prohibit its athletes from competing even as "Olympic Athletes from Russia."

Boycotts have historical connotations. The last time Russia hosted an Olympics, in Moscow in 1980, the U.S. boycotted to protest the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan. Subsequently, the Soviet Union boycotted the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

The use of sporting success as a propaganda tool was one of the consequences of the Cold War. The Soviets and many of its satellite states - notably East Germany - used sophisticated state-sponsored doping regimes to fuel their success during this era.

Echoes of that regime, particularly the East German system, resonate today. Its system was not so much state-sponsored but state-mandated.

Evidence from the surviving athletes themselves and from the Stasi files of the era reveal that young East German athletes rarely had a choice when it came to ingesting almost industrial levels of steroids, which had a devastating impact on their long-term health.

Team Versus Individual Doping

The issue of informed, collective consent and fault in sports doping has been discussed at CAS - notably in the Essendon drugs case in Australian rules football. And the nature of doping infractions in a team setting is often much more nuanced than might first appear.

Athletes generally have a real-time appreciation of their bodies: their focus is on the next game or event; they often, rightly or wrongly, assign their long-term health to others in their entourage or support staff.

While doping ultimately reveals itself in the testing of athletes' samples, as a matter of causation or responsibility, fault may lie elsewhere.

In Russia's case, it is of note that the IOC has also banned its current deputy prime minister and former sports minister, Vitaly Mutko, from all future Olympic Games. But while Mutko will not be able to attend the 2018 Winter Olympics, he will continue to be the chief organizer for the 2018 World Cup, which Russia will host.

FIFA, soccer's world governing body, does not believe this is an impediment to Russia hosting the World Cup. But expect its attitude to come under intense scrutiny in coming months, as well as the wider issue of the prevalence of doping in that sport.

Finally, banning Russia from the 2018 Winter Olympics was a straightforward decision for the IOC. The trickier issue will come with regard to the 2020 Summer Olympics. Will Russia have reformed its anti-doping policy and procedure to the standards expected by entities such as the World Anti-Doping Agency?

The criteria used by WADA and others to judge Russia will be highly technical in nature. Perhaps the most important way to gauge Russia's good faith on this matter would be to see how it treated three key whistleblowers who have been central to this whole affair: Vitaly Stepanov and his wife Yuliya, and Grigory Rodchenkov.

Thus far, Russia has traduced them. They no longer live in Russia, but in fear. If Russia continues to discredit them, it should remain discredited in the eyes of the sporting world.

Jack Anderson is a sports law professor at Melbourne Law School at the University of Melbourne. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

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See also:

"The attorney for the lab director who helped in the doping of Russia Olympic athletes, and then became a whistleblower, said his client is 'anxiety-ridden because he's afraid of what the Russian government' is going to do to his family," AP reports.

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Previously in doping:

* How Russia Hid Its Doping In Plain Sight.

* IOC: Sochi Doping Allegations Could Show 'Unprecedented Criminality.'

* On Eve Of Olympics, Top Investigator Details Secret Efforts To Undermine Russian Doping Probe.

* Doping Probe: 'Unprecedented' Russian Corruption.

* Secret To Success: A Derby Win And Racing's Doping Addiction.

* Why It's So Hard To Catch Track-And-Field Cheaters.

* Everyone's Juicing.

* Russia Walks Back Doping Admission.

* Amateur Doping.

* Opioids In The Iditarod.

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Comments welcome.

The Conversation

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:49 AM | Permalink

December 5, 2017

The Paradise Papers: The End Of Elusion For PokerStars

Dear Steve,

Our Paradise Papers coverage continues today. Our reporter Simon Bowers reveals how an online gaming company used the offshore world to cater to U.S. players.

pokerstars.jpg

We also have updates from the European Parliament last week and the calls for more tax havens to be added to the EU's "Blacklist."

We're also really excited to launch our project Alma Mater! We are looking for investigative and education reporters to help us uncover what a range of universities - from the U.S., U.K., and Canada - are doing in the offshore world. Does that sound like you or someone you know?

Until next week!
Amy Wilson-Chapman
ICIJ's Community Engagement Editor

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Previously in the Paradise Papers:
* 'Paradise Papers' Reveal Tax Avoidance, Shady Dealings Of World's Rich And Powerful.

* Just How Much Money Is Held Offshore? Hint: A SHIT-TON.

* Development Dreams Lost In The Offshore World.

* Keeping Offshore 'Hush Hush,' But Why?

* Tax Havens Are Alive With The Sound Of Music.

* Today In Tax Avoidance Of The Ultra-Wealthy.

* Go To Town With This Offshore Leaks Database.

* The Paradise Papers: The View From Africa And Asia.

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Previously in the Panama Papers:
* The Panama Papers: Remarkable Global Media Collaboration Cracks Walls Of Offshore Tax Haven Secrecy.

* The Panama Papers: Prosecutors Open Probes.

* The [Monday] Papers.

* Adventures In Tax Avoidance.

* Mossack Fonseca's Oligarchs, Dictators And Corrupt White-Collar Businessmen.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! They're All In It Together.

* Meet The Panama Papers Editor Who Handled 376 Reporters In 80 Countries.

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Previously in tax scammage:
* Deepwater Horizon Settlement Comes With $5.35 Billion Tax Windfall.

* Offshoring By 29 Companies Costs Illinois $1.2 Billion Annually.

* Government Agencies Allow Corporations To Write Off Billions In Federal Settlements.

* The Gang Of 62 Vs. The World.

* How The Maker Of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing.

* $1.4 Trillion: Oxfam Exposes The Great Offshore Tax Scam Of U.S. Companies.

* How Barclay's Turned A $10 Billion Profit Into A Tax Loss.

* Wall Street Stock Loans Drain $1 Billion A Year From German Taxpayers.

* German Finance Minister Cries Foul Over Tax Avoidance Deals.

* Prosecutor Targets Commerzbank For Deals That Dodge German Taxes.

* A Schlupfloch Here, A Schlupfloch There. Now It's Real Money.

* How Milwaukee Landlords Avoid Taxes.

* Study: 32 Illinois Fortune 500 Companies Holding At Least $147 Billion Offshore.

* Watch Out For The Coming Tax Break Trickery.

* When A 'Tax Bonanza' Is Actually A Huge Corporate Tax Break.

* The Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump.

* Oxfam Names World's Worst Tax Havens Fueling 'Global Race To Bottom.'

* Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Illinois Small Business $5,789 A Year.

* State Tax Incentives To Corporations Don't Work.

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Previously in carried interest, aka The Billionaire's Loophole:
* Patriotic Millionaires Vs. Carried Interest.

* The Somewhat Surreal Politics Of A Private Equity Tax Loophole Costing Us Billions (That Obama Refused To Close Despite Pledging To Do So).

* Fact-Checking Trump & Clinton On The Billionaire's Tax Break.

* Despite Trump Campaign Promise, Billionaires' Tax Loophole Survives Again.

* Carried Interest Reform Is a Sham.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:55 PM | Permalink

The [Tuesday] Papers

A bunch of stuff in the pipeline but the day's getting late, so I'm just gonna leave y'all with this stuff . . .

ChicagoGram

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ChicagoTube

Bloodshot Records' 13 Days of Xmas Infomercial.

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BeachBook

SAIC Grad Rocking The Art World.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Negative energy.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:02 PM | Permalink

December 4, 2017

The [Monday] Papers

I have a deadline today; I hope to finally have The Luis & Chuy Show tomorrow as well as an update of The Political Odds from the Beachwood Bookmaking Bureau.

Meanwhile . . .

"Students at the City Colleges of Chicago, the state's largest and most diverse community-college system, are eligible for a guaranteed admission program to the University of Illinois' flagship campus in Urbana under an expanded partnership this fall," the Champaign News-Gazette reports.

Gee, that sounds good.

"The UI Chicago has had a longstanding transfer agreement with City Colleges, but new partnerships were recently signed with the Urbana and Springfield campuses to make it easier for more Chicago students to transfer to those schools."

Yay!

"Currently, only a fraction of City College system graduates enroll at the Urbana campus - just 30 in 2016-17, about 3 percent of the campus' total transfer students, said Andy Borst, director of undergraduate admissions."

Well that number certainly needs boosting.

"Students who enroll in Chicago City Colleges will be guaranteed admission to any of the UI's three universities if they meet campus admission requirements and complete the mandatory community-college credits, officials said.

"Technically, the same is true for most transfer students, except in highly competitive engineering, business and LAS programs, Borst said. But the new program will provide intensive advising services to ensure students are taking the right classes to get into the school of their choice, he said.

"And top transfers will be eligible for scholarships through a new pilot program offered by the UI. Five scholarships of $2,500 a year for up to two years will be available initially - two to Urbana, two to Chicago and one to Springfield - and that number will eventually double, officials said."

Wait . . . just five scholarships (and just two to Urbana, which is championing the effort) of $2,500 a year for two years are available? That's three strikes - the just five part, the $2,500 part (annual tuition is more than $30,000), and the for just two years part.

What?

"The initiatives are designed to expand educational opportunities for Chicago-area students and improve diversity at the Urbana campus, UI President Tim Killeen said Thursday."

Not by much!

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New on today's Beachwood . . .

Call 911 - Bears Twitter Is On Fire
The way it could be worse is if Ryan Pace directed John Fox to contact the Russians.

SportsMonday: Bears Bereft
Even more so than the previously 1-10 49ers.

Chicagoetry: New Fucking Frying Pan
It's about feminism.

The Weekend In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Mest, Wage War, FireHouse, Three Bad Jacks, Elliot Moss, Hanson, and Winger.

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New on the Beachwood over the weekend . . .

Carried Interest Reform Is A Sham
Talking about closing a loophole for billionaires isn't the same as closing it.

The Week In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Fuerza Bruta, Rise Against, Rhett Miller, Greta Van Fleet, Gary Numan, Howie Day, Yelawolf, Potions, Lion's Law, and Papa Roach.

Beachwood Sports Radio: 'Til Death Do The Bears Part
With all due respect, there seems to be just one way the McCaskeys will do the right thing. Plus: Cat Trick!; Acknowledging The Bulls' Existence; The Derrick Rose Non-Tragedy; and Should We Be Paying More Attention To Northwestern Football?

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ChicagoGram

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ChicagoTube

Roy Chicago.

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BeachBook
A sampling.

National Security Agencies Are Evading Congressional Oversight.

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Evergreen.

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Rock 'N' Roll, Between The Covers.

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TV's False Portrayal Of Torture.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

Maybe he should run for state rep in the 22nd district, then.

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Well, it was a steering committee . . .

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Steinberg gonna Steinberg.

Plus, like John Kass, he's not even a Chicagoan; he's a longtime suburbanite.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Beachwood First.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:24 PM | Permalink

SportsMonday: Bears Bereft

You had to laugh. Bitterly sure, but still, it is amazing how sports work out sometimes.

What else was a fan to do as Robbie Gould screamed at the Bears sideline after his chip shot game-winning field goal Sunday at the end of the Bears' 15-14 loss to the 49ers. Gould, who is the Bears all-time leading scorer but was summarily cut from the team before last season, had actually said during the previous week that there was no such thing as a "revenge game."

His actions spoke slightly louder. Or should I say his screams actually were much louder.

Less funny was the fact that the 49ers had a much-better play-caller (head coach Kyle Shanahan) helping their much-better young quarterback have a much-better game than the Bears' Mitch Trubisky.

Arlington Heights native Jimmy Garoppolo was in command all over the field. Well, not quite all of the field. The red zone was certainly a problem. But it's hard not to believe that the 49ers will take care of that and then some in the next few years. They are a team with a bright future.

The Bears? Not so much.

Except for the ridiculousness - that was awesome and there is certainly the promise of more of that ahead.

Tarik Cohen's punt return touchdown was more ridiculous than even Devin Hester's craziest scoring effort. But perhaps the most unbelievable part of the play was the fact that no Bears committed penalties as Cohen first went backwards one way then the other and then in the blink of an eye broke upfield and didn't stop 'til he made it to the end zone. Sure enough, when Cohen broke another return in the second half, it was called back due to tight end Ben Braunecker's crushingly stupid, and completely needless, block in the back.

Cohen's score gave the Bears a decent lead and it felt like they were on their way. Well, maybe it felt that way for a couple minutes. Then the 49ers embarked on one of their half-dozen extended drives on the day and the optimism faded.

As far as the big picture goes, well, I got nothing new for 'ya.

As has been pointed out in this space more than a few times, firing the coach will not be enough. Surely that is more and more obvious. The 3-9 Bears don't even have as much talent as the bereft 2-10 49ers. I understand that teams need stability, but general manager Ryan Pace is the wrong guy to stabilize around.

For awhile I thought firing John Fox before the end of the season might be worth doing just to hand the offense completely over to offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains to see how it might play out.

But that doesn't matter at this point. Trubisky and the Bears will have to start again with a new offensive mind in the offseason. Whatever happens during the final month of this season is immaterial.

And when the Bears bring in that new guy, the potential for a downward spiral will actually be considerably higher than the chances for a turnaround. A huge factor in Aaron Rodgers' success in Green Bay has been stability in the front office and in the head coaching position. Mike McCarthy has been his coach the whole way through.

The possibility of using that model will end for the Bears' rookie signal-caller in the near future.

I think the laughter I hear at this point is coming from everywhere else in the NFC North.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 11:00 AM | Permalink

The Weekend In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Mest at Bottom Lounge on Friday night.


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2. Wage War at Durty Nellie's in Palatine on Friday night.

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3. FireHouse at the Arcada in St. Charles on Friday night.

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4. Three Bad Jacks at the Brauerhouse in Lombard on Friday night.

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5. Elliot Moss at SPACE in Evanston on Saturday night.

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6. Hanson at the House of Blues on Sunday night.

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7. Winger at the Arcada in St. Charles on Friday night.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:52 AM | Permalink

Call 911 - Bears Twitter Is On Fire

"If you're keeping a scorecard between the Bears and the 49ers and the big trade for the No. 2 pick, score a win for the 49ers in Round 1 and consider it a setback for the power brokers at Halas Hall," Brad Biggs writes for the Tribune.

"The 49ers' 15-14 victory, powered by five Robbie Gould field goals, added further embarrassment in a season gone wrong for the Bears. With the exception of a wild punt return by rookie Tarik Cohen, a 61-yard adventure that required a lot more steps than that in weaving-and-juking flash, the Bears were completely manhandled by what was a 1-10 football team."

Ouch.

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Lamarr Houston on his release by the Texans: "They just wanted young guys playing because they're not going to the playoffs any more."

He played almost every snap for the Bears' defense on Sunday.

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Fool's Gould:

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"Yes, the optics of what unfolded Sunday at Soldier Field are just brutal for the Bears, especially for Pace.

"He was beat by the kicker he cut, with the help of the quarterback (Jimmy Garoppolo) he potentially could have acquired, who happened to play at his own alma mater (Eastern Illinois).

"Only Bill Belichick knows if Garoppolo could have been a Bear, but one would think the haul Pace gave up for Mitch Trubisky (the No. 3 overall pick, two third-round picks and a fourth-rounder) could have been enough last spring.

"As it turned out, the 49ers got Garoppolo for just an early second-rounder and were on the receiving end of that haul Pace gave up for Trubisky.

"It's still way too early to know which franchise will benefit the most in the long run, but in the context of Sunday's loss to Gould and Garoppolo, it all looks bad. Really, really bad."

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"Saying the Bears hit rock bottom by losing to the 49ers actually does a disservice to rocks. The Bears still have to play the Browns on Christmas Eve."

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:51 AM | Permalink

Chicagoetry: New Fucking Frying Pan

New Fucking Frying Pan

Nobody tells me
Who I am.

Problematic in relationships
(Been a few years

Since the end of my last
Long-term commitment).

I want a fried egg?
I go to a diner
And order one or

I fry it myself.

It's about feminism:
In the early '70s, my mother
Decided she was going to get

A job.

"You want a fried egg?
Here's how you do it.
You want clean clothes?"
So now

I know how to do
All that shit.
Thanks, mom!

After (I'm guessing)
About six years with
My last frying pan I finally
Wore through the non-stick

Apparatus.

Needed a new frying pan.
Got my ass

A new fucking
Frying pan.

It's a beautiful thing.

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J.J. Tindall is the Beachwood's poet-in-residence. He welcomes your comments. Chicagoetry is an exclusive Beachwood collection-in-progress.

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More Tindall:

* Chicagoetry: The Book

* Ready To Rock: The Music

* Kindled Tindall: The Novel

* The Viral Video: The Match Game Dance

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:04 AM | Permalink

December 2, 2017

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Fuerza Bruta at Liar's Club on Thursday night.


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2. Rise Against at the Aragon on Thursday night.

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3. Rhett Miller at City Winery on Thursday night.

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4. Greta Van Fleet at Lincoln Hall on Thursday night.

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5. Gary Numan at Thalia Hall on Wednesday night.

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6. Howie Day at SPACE in Evanston on Thursday night.

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7. Yelawolf at the House of Blues on Wednesday night.

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8. Potions at the Owl on Sunday night.

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9. Papa Roach at the Aragon on Thursday night.

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10. Lion's Law at Liar's Club on Thursday night.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:40 PM | Permalink

Carried Interest Reform Is a Sham

Donald Trump isn't exactly shy when it comes to denouncing things he doesn't like. And there's one particular part of the tax code that he denounced over and over both during the campaign and after taking office.

He said that the people benefiting from this portion of the code were "getting away with murder."

So you'd think that the tax bill being pushed through Congress with Trump's eager backing would be closing this loophole. But you'd be wrong. As you'll see in a bit, talking about closing the loophole isn't the same as closing it.

The loophole is called "carried interest." That's tax jargon for the share of investors' profits that goes to the managers of private equity funds, venture capital funds and hedge funds. The standard rate is 20 percent of a fund's profits, although there's wide variation, both up and down.

The loophole is that the managers' piece of the action comes from owning a piece of the partnership called a "profits interest" rather than getting a fee from the partnership.

When an investment has been held for more than a year before being sold, the managers' "profits interest" proceeds, like the gains that go to the "capital investors" who put up the money, is taxed as long-term capital gains rather than as ordinary income. Cap gains currently carry a top federal income tax rate of 23.8 percent, whereas "earned income" such as fees and salaries carries a max tax of 40.5 percent.

(The other part of the managers' fee - typically two percent a year of the investments under management - is treated as regular income.)

People, even including many Wall Street types whom I know, have been offended by the carried interest loophole for years.

After all, if you run a mutual fund and get a bonus based on your investment performance, that bonus is treated as earned income, not capital gains. So why should things be different for managers of a private equity or venture capital or hedge fund?

(I'm putting hedge funds last because although they're the most popular target, they typically don't hold individual investments long enough to qualify for capital gains treatment.)

In November, after being criticized because their tax legislation didn't deal with carried interest, House and Senate Republicans addressed the problem. Sort of, but not really.

Their "reform" doesn't require proceeds from "profits interests" to be treated as ordinary income - which would be real reform. Rather, the legislation requires that investments be held for more than three years to get capital gains treatment, rather than the current period of more than one year.

That's pretty much a joke, given that venture capital and buyout funds - whose managers are the biggest beneficiaries of the "carried interest" loophole - typically hold investments for well over three years before selling them. This legislation has the appearance of reform, but not the substance.

A spokesman for Kevin Brady, chairman of the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee, told the New York Times that the 3-year holding period "strikes the right balance for economic growth and fairness without stifling investment in American entrepreneurship." But this doesn't address the substance of the loophole, which is that carried interest payments are actually fees masquerading as capital gains, which means they are taxed at a much lower rate than fees.

Let me take you through this a bit.

Treating the people who run partnerships differently from the people who are passive investors in partnerships has been around forever. But when private equity, venture capital and hedge funds began pulling in hundreds of billions of dollars of capital and paying their managers billions a year of carried interest, what had been a relatively obscure tax provision turned into a big deal.

Lots of private equity types claim that special tax treatment for carried interest is vital to them. However, when you look at history, you can see that claim is dubious at best.

Blackstone and Carlyle, two of the biggest private equity firms (which now call themselves alternative investment firms), were founded in 1985 and 1987, respectively.

From 1988 through 1990, regular income and capital gains were taxed at the same maximum rate: 28 percent. And in 1991 and 1992, the year another big firm, TPG, was formed, top rates were almost the same: 31 percent for regular income, about 29 percent for cap gains. So unless they were betting on the rates to change - which is, shall we say, highly unlikely - the preferential rate for carried interest was no big deal.

The rates didn't really separate much until 1993. That year, the top regular income rate was more than 10 percentage points above the cap gains rate (39.6 percent to 29.2 percent), and the spread kept widening. (You can find the year by year rates here.)

Now what about Trump? Was he fouling his own nest by criticizing carried interest? I think not.

As best as I can tell from Trump's financial filings and his leaked 2005 federal income tax return, he doesn't play the carried interest game. So even if carried interest were to be reformed properly, it wouldn't cost him anything.

The bottom line: If the pending tax legislation becomes law, heaven forbid, and the carried interest loophole requires a three-year rather than a one-year waiting period, you can bet that Trump and the Republicans will boast about how they taught Wall Street a lesson. And it will be a pack of lies.

ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.

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Previously in carried interest:
* Patriotic Millionaires Vs. Carried Interest.

* The Somewhat Surreal Politics Of A Private Equity Tax Loophole Costing Us Billions (That Obama Refused To Close Despite Pledging To Do So).

* Fact-Checking Trump & Clinton On The Billionaire's Tax Break.

* Despite Trump Campaign Promise, Billionaires' Tax Loophole Survives Again.

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See also . . .

Previously in tax scammage:
* Deepwater Horizon Settlement Comes With $5.35 Billion Tax Windfall.

* Offshoring By 29 Companies Costs Illinois $1.2 Billion Annually.

* Government Agencies Allow Corporations To Write Off Billions In Federal Settlements.

* The Gang Of 62 Vs. The World.

* How The Maker Of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing.

* $1.4 Trillion: Oxfam Exposes The Great Offshore Tax Scam Of U.S. Companies.

* How Barclay's Turned A $10 Billion Profit Into A Tax Loss.

* Wall Street Stock Loans Drain $1 Billion A Year From German Taxpayers.

* German Finance Minister Cries Foul Over Tax Avoidance Deals.

* Prosecutor Targets Commerzbank For Deals That Dodge German Taxes.

* A Schlupfloch Here, A Schlupfloch There. Now It's Real Money.

* How Milwaukee Landlords Avoid Taxes.

* Study: 32 Illinois Fortune 500 Companies Holding At Least $147 Billion Offshore.

* Watch Out For The Coming Tax Break Trickery.

* When A 'Tax Bonanza' Is Actually A Huge Corporate Tax Break.

* The Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump.

* Oxfam Names World's Worst Tax Havens Fueling 'Global Race To Bottom.'

* Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Illinois Small Business $5,789 A Year.

* State Tax Incentives To Corporations Don't Work.

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Previously in the Paradise Papers:
* 'Paradise Papers' Reveal Tax Avoidance, Shady Dealings Of World's Rich And Powerful.

* Just How Much Money Is Held Offshore? Hint: A SHIT-TON.

* Development Dreams Lost In The Offshore World.

* Keeping Offshore 'Hush Hush,' But Why?

* Tax Havens Are Alive With The Sound Of Music.

* Today In Tax Avoidance Of The Ultra-Wealthy.

* Go To Town With This Offshore Leaks Database.

* The Paradise Papers: The View From Africa And Asia.

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Previously in the Panama Papers:
* The Panama Papers: Remarkable Global Media Collaboration Cracks Walls Of Offshore Tax Haven Secrecy.

* The Panama Papers: Prosecutors Open Probes.

* The [Monday] Papers.

* Adventures In Tax Avoidance.

* Mossack Fonseca's Oligarchs, Dictators And Corrupt White-Collar Businessmen.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! They're All In It Together.

* Meet The Panama Papers Editor Who Handled 376 Reporters In 80 Countries.

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Comments welcome.


Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:34 PM | Permalink

December 1, 2017

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #177: 'Til Death Do The Bears Part

With all due respect, there seems to be just one way the McCaskeys will do the right thing. Plus: Cat Trick!; Acknowledging The Bulls' Existence; The Derrick Rose Non-Tragedy; and Should We Be Paying More Attention To Northwestern Football?


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SHOW NOTES

* 177.

:16: Pace Case.

* Trading Places.

* The Savage Truth.

* Tony Tre McBride.

* Why Trubisky Will Have To Be To Tom Brady To Make Pace's Draft Day Deal Worth It.

* Dickerson: Was Mitchell Trubisky Worth The Price?

* Michael, George And Mommy.

* In Trestman We Trust!

* Mulligan: Shouldn't The Fates Of John Fox And Ryan Pace Be Interlocked?

* Rozner: Another Day, Another Narrative Bites The Dust.

* Pompeii: The problem with Ryan Pace's free agent signings.

* Haugh: Are The Bears Putting More Faith In Ryan Pace Than He Deserves?

* Haugh: Bears' Brian McCaskey On Hearing Loss: 'Technology Has Really Saved Me.'

* Assignment Desk: What Happens When Virginia Dies?

* Haugh: It's Time Mitch Trubisky Reminded Us Why Bears Gave 49ers A Draft Haul.

* Kid Loggains.

* Podium vs. Lectern.

* Gabriel: Sources: Neither John Fox Nor Vic Fangio In Chicago Bears' Future Plans.

(To which we say, "Good!")

38:45: Cat Trick!

* Coffman: "You don't salvage a point at home against the Stars!"

* Is this the end for The Toews & Kane Show?

47:07: Acknowledging The Bulls' Existence.

* Coffman: "The bloom is off the Markkanen."

Awww, c'mon!

* Sidebar: The Derrick Rose Non-Tragedy.

54:37: Should We Be Paying More Attention To Northwestern Football?

* Greenberg: "I would've defied anyone to spend three-plus hours at Memorial Stadium on Saturday and try to see the glass - any glass - as half-full. The so-called Land of Lincoln rivalry game, scheduled on the final weekend of the regular season because it's supposed to be a big deal, was a fly on the rear ends of, say, Alabama-Auburn and Michigan-Ohio State. You know, the real rivalry games. Northwestern-Illinois was so irrelevant, it was almost as if it didn't exist. Fitzgerald referred to the Illini's home as a 'sleepy building.' It was a nicer way to say 'empty.'"

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STOPPAGE: 3:12

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For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:48 PM | Permalink

The [Friday] Papers

ETA for The Luis & Chuy Show: This weekend.

Sneak preview:

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In pre-production: The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #177 and The Week In Chicago Rock.

Meanwhile . . .

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New on the Beachwood today . . .

Time For The Royal Scroungers To Earn Their Keep
Remaking that special relationship.

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ChicagoGram

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ChicagoTube

Chicago sends off first Special Olympics flag football team.

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BeachBook

At Least Four Chicago-Area Women Included Among 180 Reporting Sexual Assaults At Massage Envy.

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All Big Mac Creator Got Was A Plaque.

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Laura Kipnis: Kick Against The Pricks.

This is an interesting piece but it's not easy for everyone to be Laura Kipnis and just kick their assailants in the balls.

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Why He Can't Vote For Pritzker.

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Among Bettors, College Football Is Pushing The NFL Aside.

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Bring your own tap.

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TweetWood
A sampling.

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The Beachwood Tronc Line: Baked.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:28 AM | Permalink

Time For The Royal Scroungers To Earn Their Keep

Remaking that special relationship.


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Previously in Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter!:

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Explains The Economy.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! It's Shit Crap News, Tim.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Is Going To Paris.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Grow Some Balls; Tell The Truth.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! MP Is A Wanker Santa.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Merry Fucking Christmas.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! New Year's Rant.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Sexy Skype.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! TTIP Is Boring Shit.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Truth About Teachers & Doctors.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Valentine's Day 2016.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! On The 'Environment" Beat.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Political Theater As News.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Charter Wankers International.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Panama Papers: They're All In It Together.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Answer The Fucking Question.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Snapchatting The Environment.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Election Fever!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Day-Glo Fuck-Nugget Trump.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Dickens Meets The Jetsons.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Tony Blair: Comedy Genius Or Psychopath?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! What Real Business News Should Look Like.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Facts Are No Longer Newsworthy.

* Pie's Brexit.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Real Life Is Not Game Of Thrones.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Labor: The Clue's In The Title!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Pie Olympics.

* Occupy Pie.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Where Is The War Against Terrorble Mental Health Services?

* Progressive Pie.

* The BBC's Bake-Off Bollocks.

* Pie Commits A Hate Crime.

* Pie Interviews A Teenage Conservative.

* Jonathan Pie's Idiot's Guide To The U.S. Election.

* President Trump: How & Why.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! All The News Is Fake!

* Happy Christmas From Jonathan Pie.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! 2016 In Review.

* Inauguration Reporting.

* New Year: New Pie?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Make The Air Fair.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! A Gift To Trump?

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Strong And Unstable.

* Pie & Brand: Hate, Anger, Violence & Carrying On.

* Socialism Strikes Back!

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Election Carnage.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Papering Over Poverty.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! The Queen's Speech.

* Showdown: North Korea vs. Trump.

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Plus:

If Only All TV Reporters Did The News Like This.

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And:

Australia Is Horrific.

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Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:14 AM | Permalink

MUSIC - Christgau Loves Chicago Neonatologist.
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POLITICS - Yes On Vouchers For After-School Programs.
SPORTS - The Ex-Cub Factor.

BOOKS - Writers Under Surveillance.

PEOPLE PLACES & THINGS - Original Warrior.


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