Chicago - Nov. 17, 2017
Music TV Politics Sports Books People Places & Things
 
Must-See TV
Army Of Darkness
ElRey
5 p.m.
A discount-store employee is time-warped to a medieval castle, where he is the foretold savior who can dispel the evil there. Unfortunately, he screws up and releases an army of skeletons. (tvguide.com)
Weather Derby
Tribune: 51/37
Sun-Times: Ferro/McKinney
Weather Channel: 44/41
Ntl Weather Service: 54/43
BWM*: 82/12
Beachwood Bookmarks
K-Tel Classics
WKRP in Cincinnati
So You've Decided To Be Evil
St. Paul Saints
Nye's Polonaise Room
The Arcata Eye
Roadside USA
This Day In . . .
Onion History
Weird Al History
Baseball History
Beachwood History
History History
Spy Magazine History
#OnThisDate History
Chicago
Indicted!
Under Suspicion
Find Your Towed Car
Cable TV Complaints
Freedom of Information
The Expired Meter
The Mob & Friends
Stolen Bike Registry
O'Hare Music Tracker
Rats
Report Corruption (city)
Report Corruption (state)
Beyond
Scoundrels, State
Scoundrels, Federal
The Odds
Random Flight Tracker
Casting Calls
Cosmic Log
Buy Stamps
Beachwood Blogroll
A Handy List
Beachwood Ethics Statement
How We Roll
Today's Horoscope
Liberties will be taken.
Do We Sudoku?
No, but we do do moose stuff, and that can be anything you want it to be. Except Sudoku.
Losing Lottery Numbers
8, 25, 39
Daily Affirmation
I am open and receptive to new avenues of income. (louisehay.com)
Ellie
Knowing that a person may be unwittingly in danger of an assault imposes a moral duty to warn them.
Now Playing
Psychodrama/Marshall Law
Letters to the Editors
FAQ
About
Tip Line
"The Papers" archive
RSS
Beachwood Link Buttons
Media Kit/Advertising
 

« August 2017 | Main | October 2017 »

September 30, 2017

Lincoln Square vs. Hate

Lincoln Square neighbors will rally Sunday to denounce the latest incident of hate speech graffiti and fight back against the rising specter of white nationalism, both in our country and in our backyard.

Following the rally, over 4,000 "Hate Has No Home Here" and "Black Lives Matter" signs will be distributed throughout the neighborhood, drowning out the hateful rhetoric with messages of inclusiveness.

hateGraffiti.jpg

2017-09-29_0002.jpg

Community members are holding this rally and poster distribution to demonstrate that these messages of hate do not represent our community. Hate has no home in Lincoln Square and we will demonstrate that with message of love and solidarity.

"Lincoln Square has been made a target of hate, and we plan to fight back every time this happens," said Jason Rieger, Lincoln Square resident. "They can try to divide us by spray painting our sidewalks and signs, but here's the thing: for every sign they vandalize, we will put up a thousand new signs."

WHEN: Sunday, October 1, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
11 a.m. - gather and pass out signs for delivery
11:30 a.m. - rally begins with speakers
12:30 p.m. - rally concludes and Lincoln Square resident head out to distribute signs.

WHERE: Community members gather at Waters Elementary Soccer Field (4540 N. Campbell)

WHO: Lincoln Square community members angered and dismayed by the appearance of hate speech in Lincoln Square, in partnership with Indivisible Lincoln Square and Chicago Progress.

Speakers include:

* Jeff Zacharias and Bradd Easton, local gay couple whose home was vandalized with hate speech.

* Andre Vasquez, Chicago Progress.

* Ugo Okere, Fuerza Del Sol.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:48 AM | Permalink

September 29, 2017

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #171: It's Not About Trubisky!

All narrative roads lead to Ryan Pace. Plus: The President Of The United States Is Pro-Brain Damage; The Best Part Of The Cubs' Week; White Sox Making Believers; Blackhawks Backup Goalie Sitch; Wade Era vs. Glennon Era; Millennials Killing Football; Rick Pitino Was Just The Worst; and Schweinsteiger!


-

SHOW NOTES

* 171.

* Alshon Jeffery > Mike Glennon.

* Jahns: In Need Of A Jolt, The Bears Need Trubisky.

But why - to get back in the playoff chase? C'mon!

* Haugh: Mike Glennon's Performance Begs For Mitch Trubisky To Come To Bears Rescue.

He's gonna rescue the season - get them to the playoffs? C'mon!

* Sports Illustrated: Deshaun Watson: Texans' Approach With The Rookie QB.

* Right?

* Haw haw.

* Packers vs. Steelers.

* Coffman: The Cooper Blooper.

33:11 The President Of The United States Is Pro-Brain Damage.

39:07: The Best Part Of The Cubs' Week.

* Runner-up:

59:43: White Sox Making Believers.

1:02:54: Blackhawks Backup Goaltender Battle Coming Into Focus.

1:04:18: Dwyane Wade Era Lasted Longer Than Mike Glennon Era.

1:04:45: Millennials Killing Football.

* Whitney Young Cancels Rest Of Football Season, Saying It Can't Field Enough Players.

* The future?

1:06:50: Niles North Suspends Football Season Amid Hazing Probe.

1:07:59: Rick Pitino Was Just The Worst.

1:10:04: Schweinsteiger!

-

Hey, Bears, shake Trubisky like a Polaroid picture!

-

STOPPAGE: 12:20

-

For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:50 PM | Permalink

Saving The Rohingya: Stopping Genocide And Volunteering In Chicago

Panel discussion at Roosevelt University in Chicago, 425 South Wabash, Room 418, Monday October 2, from 4 to 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public.

In the spirit of "Think Globally and Act Locally," this panel will help people understand the causes of the genocide policies of Myanmar (formerly Burma) directed at the Rohingya, a Moslem minority; what the United States and UN are doing to change this trajectory; advocacy to protect and assist the Rohingya, and programs to help Chicago Rohingya refugees improve their adjustment to America.

This panel will be moderated by professor Phil Hultquist, director of the International Relations program at Roosevelt University, and will open with Chicago Buddhist Peace Fellowship teacher Jack Lawlor reading a statement derived from the writings of spiritual leader Thich Nhat Hanh.

Speaking will be professor Azeem Ibrahim from the Army War College and author of the book The Rohingyas: Inside Myanmar's Hidden Genocide; Abdul Malik Mujahid, director of Burma Task Force USA; and Nasir Zakaria, director of the Rohingya Culture Center in Chicago.

A short video of a recent interview of U.S. Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-IL) with Hultquist will be played, and an information table from the Burma Task Force and Rohingya Cultural Center will be available.

This panel will help students, faculty and the general public understand this issue better to encourage them to be activists and volunteers in this realm and provide specific ways to do that without traveling to New York, Washington D.C. Brussels, Rakhine State, or Naypyidaw.

See also the item in this edition of The [Monday] Papers.

-

And:

*

*

-

Comments welcome.


Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:11 PM | Permalink

Dots & Dashes

Moving between the languages of love and war, Jehanne Dubrow's latest book offers valuable testimony to the experiences of military wives.

Frequently employing rhyme, meter, and traditional forms, these poems examine what it means to be both a military spouse and an academic, straddling two communities that speak in very different and often conflicting terms.

dotsanddashes.jpg

As in the poet's earlier collection, Stateside, the poems in Dots & Dashes are explicitly feminist, exploring the experiences of women whose husbands are deployed.

But while Stateside looked to masculine stories of war, Dots & Dashes incorporates the views and voices of female poets who have written about combat.

Looking to Sappho and Emily Dickinson, the poet considers how the act of writing allows her autonomy and agency rarely granted to military spouses, even in the 21st century.

Dubrow catalogs the domestic life of a military spouse, illustrating what it is like to live in a tightly constructed world of rules and regulations, ceremony and tradition, where "every sacrifice already / knows its place."

Navigating the rough seas of marriage alongside questions about how civilians and those in the military can learn to communicate with one another, Dubrow argues for compassion and empathy on both sides.

In this timely collection, Dubrow offers the hope that if we can break apart our preconceptions and stereotypes, we can find what connects all of us.

-

See also:

* The Military Spouse Book Review: Calling Any Station: Jehanne Dubrow's Dots & Dashes.

-

Plus:

* 2010 Fresh Air interview.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:35 AM | Permalink

Beachwood Photo Booth: Scream

She can't hear you.

moderndayscream.jpg(ENLAGE FOR PROPER VIEWING)

-

Editor's Note: From Grand Rapids, Michigan, where diehard Chicagoan Helene Smith is temporarily in residence.

-

More Chicago photography from Helene Smith.

-

Helene on Twitter!

-

Meet Helene!

-

Stationery, iPhone cases, hoodies.

-

Listen to Helene talk about Photo Booth; starts at 57:54.

-

Previously:
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Man Grilling
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Yum Yum Donuts
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Father's Day
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vintage Airmaster
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Time
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Shade
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Illinois Slayer
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Fire Escape
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Nugget
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hollywood, Chicago
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flag Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Van In Flames.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fluid Power Automation.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Corn Dog.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop The Killing Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Backyard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A to Z Things.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Swedish Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Rothschild Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Silos.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Wires.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Orange Garden.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Irving Park Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Pigeons.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Lanagan's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: For Rent.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Pizza & Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mori Milk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Breakfast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Chicago Christmas Postcard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Harold's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Family Fun.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snow Bike.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nativity Scene.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Warsaw.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deluxe Cleaners.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Golden Cue.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Die Another Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sears Key Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jeri's Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Barry's Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Liberty.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Kitchen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Specials.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Won The Cup.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartender Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Plane Blues.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Finest Quality.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Family Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Girls Wanted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skokie Savanna.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Signpost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Man And The Tree.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Street Fleet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Citgo Story.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fantasy Hair Design.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Garage.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Clark Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pole Position.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Geometry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Found Love.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fill In The Blank.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vacuums Of The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dumpster Still Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wagon Master.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Intersecting West Rogers Park.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Antiques.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cow Patrol.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Backstage Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skully Bungalow.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Francisco Frankenstein.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Long Cool Heat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Smokers' Mast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Big Fat Phone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Happy Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alley Men.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Show!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You've Got Mailbox.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Broken Window Theory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dali Logan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Svengoolie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Horner Park Hot Dogs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cubs Rehab.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 20th Century Schizoid Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Men On Vans.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Is Done.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snowy Lincoln.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Waiting Room.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Avondale Chicken.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Winter's End.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Friendly Skies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boyhood Buzzer Beater.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: J Date.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: International Window Lady.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shanghai Inn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Open For Business.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Andersonville Unplugged.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 3-Flat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Turkey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicagolandia.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Eat At Odge's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deitch Pharmacy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sud-Z Bubble.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bands Wanted!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Belmont Tavern.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Superheroic San Luis Freeze.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Oasis.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lyndale Food & Jewelry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Book Window.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alco Dude.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ballin Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Worry, Be Cookie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Four Trey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Office.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America From Inside The Golden Nugget In Ravenswood.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cellphone Repair.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boots 'N' Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunrise Strip.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: At The Corner Of Glad And Happy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Uptown Autumn Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mid-Century Modern Halloween.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Autumn Station Wagon.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Betty's & Nick's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ohio House Impact.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: End School Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Portage Park Peek-A-Boo.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: South Side Sundown.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Susie's Drive-Thru.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Ham.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Food & Liquor, Milhouse.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Hare Blue Line Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Schwing!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ad Deluxe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jesus At The Drive-In.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Tanks Of Avondale.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Conveyance Belt.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Esquire In The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nick's Meat Market.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Keep Havin A Good Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Knock Knock.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Man At Marie's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonneville.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Logan Bags.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Stairwell.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Velvet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Court Is In Session.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: DLER ALKY.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Railyards Rush Hour.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop Killing People.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 1.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Greystone Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You Are Beautiful.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Auto Part Overlords.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bearground.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 2.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skyway Sculpture.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Dome Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hello, St. Joe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Revolution Books.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Driveway.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Proceed To Checkout.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Summer Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Daily Double.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Are Moving.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 3.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunny Day Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ashland & Pawn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Party Store.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Donuts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: AAA Sales.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Rule.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Butcher Boy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Endorsement.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: I Voted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pink(ish) Cadillac.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stuffed With Sadness.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Air.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Economy Heating.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Season's Greetings.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Housemates.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Have Fresh Goat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartcam.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gaslight.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Urban Wheat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Embassy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln's Cozy Corner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Glory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bowling Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Red Lion, Red Hots.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Sitting.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Jukebox Is Not A Democracy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Descending Darkly.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Handicapped Milk Jug Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gumball Express.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicken Run.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wyoming, Michigan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bus Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Manzana.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Look Back.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mail Call.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gas Pump No. 8.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Photo Shoot.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flotos' Gifts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shelf Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: S&M Carpets.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Elvis At The Golden Nugget.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wunder's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Daisies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Supply Line.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sal's Barber Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Classy Oogle Queen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cloudy Gate.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cherry Pie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lannings' Crossing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Devilish Dr. Phil.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mural Man.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:25 AM | Permalink

The [Friday] Papers

Outside, too.

#flicksonflash #atomixsketchevent #atomicsketch #sketchsession #

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

-

New On Today's Beachwood

Beachwood Photo Booth: Scream.

*

*

Chicago And Saving The Rohingya.

*

Beachwood Sports Radio: It's Not About Trubisky!
All narrative roads lead to Ryan Pace. Plus: The President Of The United States Is Pro-Brain Damage; The Best Part Of The Cubs' Week; White Sox Making Believers; Blackhawks Backup Goalie Sitch; Wade Era vs. Glennon Era; Millennials Killing Football; Rick Pitino Was Just The Worst; and Schweinsteiger!

*

The Week In Chicago Rock
Is in pre-production.

-

BeachBook

Whole Foods' First Year In Englewood Mixed.

*

New Fed Data: Black Wealth Cratered Under Obama.

*

Sports Illustrated Whitesplains Why It Left Colin Kaepernick Off Its "Sports United" Cover.

*

Obama A Disaster For Civil Liberties.

*

Vanity Fair's Cover Story About Kate McKinnon Is Weird As Hell.

It's not so much that it's weird but that it's so awful, cliched and painfully crappy - I mean, that lead, really? It's like struggling between parody and cluelessness, completely lacking in self-awareness while trying to demonstrate . . . self-awareness. Just ... no. F.

*

Jonathan Toews: Anthem Controversy Has Clouded The Protest's Meaning.

*

Why Aren't Paychecks Growing? Burger Joint Clause Offers One Of Many Reasons.

*

Obama's FOIA Record Worse Than Bush's.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Do your job.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:19 AM | Permalink

September 28, 2017

The [Thursday] Papers

Save Puerto Rico, Save Mexico.

-

On The Occasion Of Hugh Hefner's Death

Radical Feminist vs. Monster.

*

My thoughts on the radical feminist argument, from a Facebook discussion:

I guess my response is why couldn't he publish such an interesting, feminist magazine without the objectifying nudie pics?

Also, there's nothing wrong with photos of nudity, but if he was such a feminist, he would have shown photos of all kinds of women, not just a certain type with ridiculous "standards" . . . which isn't to say he wasn't also a feminist, but also, remember, a lot of the enlightened men of the '60s/'70s social movements were not so enlightened when it came to women . . . they hadn't quite worked that part out. That's why Yoko Ono once said that women were the n*****s of the world. Also, I wonder if Hefner had any female editors - I mean, maybe! Just wondering. Which is to say, he might very well have been a feminist, but not a fully developed one. Also, I would say that supporting birth control isn't necessarily feminist - it's a great convenience for men! So, maybe more feminist than most, but still lacking in many fundamental ways.

*

P.S.: And then, of course, all that old-man-with-fake-young-girlfriends business, I mean, gross. Really. Beyond gross - monstrous.

-

From Families for Depression Awareness . . .

As Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Comes To A Close, Remember The Families Who Have Lost Someone To Suicide

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month is a time when the mental health advocacy community works to educate the public on how to help someone at risk of suicide. It is also a time to acknowledge suicide's lasting effect on families like Xavier and Cory Whitford of Illinois, who experienced the crippling pain of losing a loved one.

Although Tommy was only 3-years-old when his father died in a car accident, mother Xavier says "I think the early trauma of his father's death affected him his entire life."

Xavier married Cory five years later. He remembers bonding immediately with Xavier's two kids, although Cory and Tommy's relationship wasn't always smooth sailing. While his sister called Cory "dad" right away, it took Tommy 10 years to do so.

Tommy started exhibiting signs of depression in elementary school. By the time he reached high school, his depression had gotten so bad that he was self-medicating with drugs. In 2014, when Tommy was 19 and had just finished high school, he found out that his girlfriend was pregnant. Cory believes that Tommy got off of drugs for good because he knew he had to provide for his family. Xavier thought he was turning a corner. "He never let on that he was suicidal and I didn't know to ask," she recalls.

On August 18, 2014, Tommy took his life after a fight with his girlfriend. Xavier found his body.

The grief and trauma that she suffered threw Xavier into a deep depression. "I had always been an organized, driven person," she says. "But this depression caused me to be different. I'd forget my keys or to pay bills - it was like I couldn't focus on anything." Even today, three years after Tommy's death, Xavier's cognitive impairment from depression has persisted.

Cory immediately went into caregiver mode - a role with which he was familiar from his job as a pastor. He asked his wife to make lists of things for him to do around the house. He tried to be patient and understanding, even as their relationship suffered from a lack of intimacy. Cory put so much on himself that he eventually became depressed. "Since I jumped right into taking care of my family, I never took time to go through my own grieving process," Cory says.

It has been a long road for the couple. Both are now in therapy to help them cope with the aftermath of Tommy's death. They also share their story of loss with others. "I tell parents that it is their job to become educated about depression and suicide," says Xavier. "It can happen to anybody." For his part, Cory encourages families to have open, honest communication. He especially wants other family caregivers to know that they have to be compassionate and kind when supporting a depressed spouse. "Your loved one will see your efforts and appreciate them," Cory affirms. "Through all the pain, we've learned to love each other more."

To interview the Whitford family or a Families for Depression Awareness representative, contact Valerie Cordero at (781) 890-0220 or valerie@familyaware.org.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

Democracy is such a burden to too many public officials; they don't seem to understand that making information about what they do public is a significant part of their jobs, instead of a nuisance they are forced to comply with.

*

Speaking of which . . .

*

Learn, dammit!

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Rats, cages, ships.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:10 AM | Permalink

September 27, 2017

The [Wednesday] Papers

Making movies.

-

What Black Athletes Can Teach Us
Way more than sports, that's for sure.

-

The Wrong Way To Save Your Life
Reportedly warm, witty and wise.

-

Harvesting Wisconsin's Nuts
A few suggestions for a quality haul.

-

BeachBook

How Obama's Drones Rulebook Enabled Trump.

*

Here Is The $13 Billion Federal Case Against JPMorgan That Jamie Dimon, Known As "Obama's Favorite Banker," Doesn't Want You To See.

*

In Paywall Age, Free Content Remains King For Newspaper Sites.

*

Park District Defends Partial 606 Closure For Private Fundraiser.

*

Chicago Was Too Tough (Or Too Saturated, More Like; Enough With The Aggrandizing Of Fake Civic Virtues) For These Burger Chains.

*

HARVARD FELLOWSHIPS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A JOKE.

Pretty much all institutional rewards are a joke - almost always counter to the stated purpose.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Connect the jots.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:30 AM | Permalink

Black Athletes Can Teach Us About More Than Just Sports

Bullying is not a newly discovered problem. But there is no denying it has been exacerbated by the President of the United States, Donald Trump. His singling out of sports heroes Steph Curry, Jemele Hill and Colin Kaepernick for their stands against bigotry is more evidence that Trump takes a literal interpretation of the bully pulpit idea. How these black sportsmen and women form a team against racism offers tormented youth a playbook on how to deal with bullies.

One in four children are bullied. That's the main finding of a new study conducted by YouthTruth, a national nonprofit that conducts student surveys on educational issues. The results repeated last year's findings.

When I shared the one-in-four stat with a father of two, he told me, "Power plays happen in all kinds of social settings. Schools aren't different." He went on to say, "Part of an education is learning how to deal with mean people."

He could have been referring to President Trump, who this past weekend "dis-invited" the basketball star and two-time Most Valuable Player of the NBA Steph Curry from a not-yet scheduled visit to the White House with a tweet - after the Golden State Warriors' point guard had already said he wouldn't go to the White House if his team asked.

Dating back to the 1960s, it has been tradition for champions of major sports teams to take part in a White House ceremony. Another former MVP, LeBron James, chimed in with his own tweet: "U bum @StephenCurry30 already said he ain't going! So therefore ain't no invite. Going to White House was a great honor until you showed up!" Curry and James play on rival teams and have played against each other in multiple championships, but they are on the same team against hate.

A week earlier, the White House broke presidential etiquette by calling for the ouster of a private citizen, ESPN broadcaster Jemele Hill, who called Trump a white supremacist - partially based on his racist remarks about immigrants, his likening of Nazis with their counter-protestors, as well as his past discriminatory housing practices and race-baiting campaign against the Central Park Five. As James did for Curry, Hill's colleagues created a unified front against harassment. The progressive news site ThinkProgress broke the exclusive that ESPN executives tried to remove Hill from her show three hours after the White House said she should be fired, but her black colleagues refused to replace her, forcing the network brass to keep Hill on the air.

Last Friday, in a political rally in Alabama, Trump attempted to bully NFL players who follow Kaepernick's lead in taking a knee during the national anthem in protest of police brutality since 2016. "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out. He's fired! He's fired,'" howled Trump.

In a sports-obsessed country, Americans, particularly young people, admire and emulate black athletes who dominate two of the most revenue-generating professional sports, football and basketball, as well as their own sports teams in high school and college. We follow black athletes' workout habits, styles, relationships and, maybe now, the way they confront racist bullies.

YouthTruth surveyed more than 180,000 students in 37 states in grades five through 12 to learn "how much, in what ways, and why students are being bullied," according to the report.

Among students who were bullied, 44 percent said their appearance was the primary reason. Seventeen percent cited their race or skin color; 15 percent said it was because others thought they were gay. Socioeconomic class, religion, nationality, gender and disability were also cited as significant factors.

The bullies' primary weapon of choice was their mouth. The study found verbal bullying to be most prevalent, at 73 percent. Social bullying, which includes deliberately harming someone's reputation or relationships, according to a government website, followed at 54 percent. Cyberbullying and physical harassment were less frequent at 28 and 23 percent respectively.

Bullying may be ubiquitous, but it doesn't have to be normalized - especially by the president.

Ironically, Donald and Melania Trump flatly contradicted each other last week. On Sept. 19 at the United Nations General Assembly, President Trump made a pugnacious speech in which he said, "The United States has great strength and patience, but if it is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea." The following day, at a United Nations' luncheon, First Lady Melania Trump said, "By our own example we must teach children to be good stewards of the world they will inherit . . . We must remember that they are watching and listening . . . As adults we are not merely responsible. We are accountable."

Trump's position doesn't pardon his bullying behaviors. And we need courageous people willing to take on the personal and professional risks of confronting Trump and racist bullies. Individuals can't take on an administration bereft of moral reasoning. We need a team. Throughout history, athletes who exhibit heroism on the field have joined forces to combat hatred off of it.

Muhammad Ali held the U.S. government accountable for transnational militarism and domestic racism by refusing to be drafted for the Vietnam War in 1967. While the boxing federation and numerous states stripped Ali of his license to box, other black athletes, including fellow boxers and numerous prominent football and basketball players financially and outspokenly supported Ali as the government painted him a traitor.

Sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos gave the black power salute during the 200-meter medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, in protest of global segregation and human rights violations. Smith and Carlos were stripped of their medals and were sent home in disgrace. But the black community gave them a hero's welcome. The often-forgotten white athlete in the iconic photo, Australian sprinter Peter Norman, supported Smith and Carlos by wearing a patch that read: "Olympic Project for Human Rights." But unlike Smith and Carlos, Norman was shunned by his countrymen for his gesture of racial unity.

The significance of Kaepernick protesting police brutality and racial injustice is clear. His teammates in the struggle can show they have his back by exercising their constitutional right and taking a knee in support. Several continue to protest. Oakland Athletics catcher Bruce Maxwell became the first MLB player to do so on Saturday, more than a year after Kaepernick's demonstrations began. The next day, dozens of NFL players followed suit and flexed their cultural might in reaction to Trump's verbal and cyberthreats.

Black athletes are the heart of American culture. Singer/rapper Jidenna made it plain in a tweet: "You can't make America great again by going after athletes. Sports makes America great. #TakeTheKnee."

In 2015, the University of Missouri footballers who joined black students in protest of racism on campus offered administrators an ultimatum: University System President Tim Wolfe had to go or the team wouldn't play. In a matter of days, Wolfe resigned. From Jackie Robinson to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, we have countless examples of athletes using the power of protest and organizing to teach the rest of us how to beat back racism, xenophobia and militarism.

There is an opportunity to learn the deeper values of teamwork. When confronted by a bully, we can take lessons from Jemele Hill, Steph Curry and LeBron James, as well as Ali, Smith, Carlos and Robinson. The most effective approach to bullying is a collective one.

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.


Previously by Andre Perry:
* Black And Brown Kids Don't Need To Learn 'Grit,' They Need Schools To Stop Being Racist.

* Why Black Lives Matter Should Take On Charter Schools.

* Don't Be Surprised If Colin Kaepernick Prompts More Schoolchildren To Sit For The Pledge Of Allegiance.

* "Wraparound" Services Are Not The Answer.

* Youth Aren't Props.

* NOLA's Secret Schools.

* Poor Whites Just Realized They Need Education Equity As Much As Black Folk.

* Letting Our Boys Onto The Football Field Is A Losing Play.

* America Has Never Had A Merit-Based System For College Admissions.

* Don't Ever Conflate Disaster Recovery With Education Reform.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:46 AM | Permalink

September 26, 2017

The Wrong Way To Save Your Life

In an event presented by the Society of Midland Authors, Megan Stielstra will discuss her new book The Wrong Way to Save Your Life, an insightful collection of essays about life and death, marriage and motherhood, joy and sorrow. It's warm, witty and wise.

"For its wisdom and compassion, honesty and courage, Stielstra's stellar essay collection is a lifeline and a microscope, a means of examining the dread of whatever one finds daunting and a manner of exorcising demons through the sheer power of commitment and desire," says Booklist.

wrongway.jpg

Stielstra is an artist-in-residence at Northwestern University and a longtime company member with Chicago's 2nd Story storytelling collective. Recently, she joined the New York Times as a contributing opinion writer.

Tuesday, October 10, at the Cliff Dwellers Club, 200 S. Michigan Ave., 22nd floor.

* 6 p.m.: Social hour, with complimentary snacks & cash bar
* 7 p.m.: Stielstra's presentation
* Free and open to the public.
* No advance registration is required.

-

Bonus Stielstra video:

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:14 PM | Permalink

Battle Of The Sexes - Then And Now

Midway through Bobby Riggs' cocky telephone pitch to Billie Jean King in 1973 - a nationally televised tennis match with a $100,000 prize between her, the top-ranked female player, and himself, the fading superstar - Riggs brands the event: "Male chauvinist pig versus hairy-legged feminist," he says, succinctly defining the cultural stakes.

Although Riggs instantly walks back his hustle with a glib, "No offense," it sets the terms. Yes, Riggs, 55, needs the money (and the renewed fame); and yes, playing against the eye-popping King, 29, will make for great tennis and must-see TV. But this is a boy-girl smackdown, a commercial appeal to the gender wars then agitating the country.

King, beyond offended, ultimately agrees to defend her titles and her sex - after she sets him straight. "By the way," she says quietly, "I shave my legs."

That scene, in Battle of the Sexes, the smartly engaging and depressingly relevant new movie about the match, starring Emma Stone and Steve Carell, is a blast from the past loaded with lessons for the future, an eerie reminder that today's rebloom of sexism is a scary echo of decades - actually, centuries - of innate and cultural misogyny. And it's a handy playbook to get through our current crisis. Crises.

postimageimage-548690ce-4c37-4d2f-bfcb-20b3c26a446c-1280x720.jpgEmma Stone as Billie Jean King and Steve Carell as Bobby Riggs in Battle of the Sexes/Melinda Sue Gordon, 20th Century Fox Film Corporation

Full disclosure: I was one of those 1970s "women's libbers" (a derisive term that we tactically co-opted) judged more for the silkiness of our lower limbs than the capacity of our brains.

Judged, that is, by some men (mostly men) terrified about a social upheaval that would restrict their historic privilege; men who believed that women who shunned everything from razors to rouge on the path to liberation - a choice made by some to be taken seriously, not as a sex object - were alien and ugly beings.

Dopey? Yup.

Rational? Nope.

But that's what we were up against.

It was a time when women earned 57 cents to every dollar that a man took home - way worse for a tennis pro, which is why King had led the revolt to give women a league of their own.

It was a time when Freud's "biology is destiny" was still mainlined by the patriarchy, confining women to the kitchen and the bedroom despite other obvious talents.

As one male character in the movie opposing King's plea for equal prize money says smugly, "The men are simply more exciting to watch. That's just biology."

A time when ABC Sports superstar Howard Cosell, announcing the tennis circus that night from the Houston Astrodome, noted, as King was struggling to recover from a series of lost points, that she was "walking more like a male than female." Whatever that meant.

It was 1973, when marriage was still so cherished as a woman's most respectable career that The New York Times, reporting the match of the century (front page, below the fold) between a self-described "male chauvinist pig" and a fiercely competitive feminist, quaintly called her "Mrs. King." Even after she crushed the sassy hustler in three straight sets (6-4, 6-3, 6-3).

As a young woman cheering the spectacle at a New York watch party, along with some 90 million prime-time viewers around the world, I knew I had seen the future. So, of course, did King.

"I think this match will do great things for women's tennis," she said afterward, underestimating her impact. "I've always wanted to equalize things for us . . . And I think we'll find in the next decade that women athletes will finally get the attention they deserve."

King soon expanded her vision to equality in all fields, for any gender. As she told me in a phone conversation this week, "A lot of young men watching the match became the first generation of men committed to the women's movement. So that was really good, too."

So, game, set and match, right?

Alas.

In the four-plus decades since King's victory helped lob all women toward parity and beyond - a time during which she has continually pushed against barriers on and off the court as glass ceilings and macho attitudes started falling - women are still being thwarted and patronized by modern versions of Bobby Riggs, without his occasionally redeeming humor and period-accurate sideburns.

In Silicon Valley, charges of sex discrimination and sexual harassment have sparked widespread soul-searching among male tech management.

In the newly stocked swamps of the Capitol, "man-terrupting" led House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, no shrinking violet, to ask the 10 men sharing a White House dinner table, "Does anybody listen to women when they speak around here?"

How can it be, asks the Washington Post's Ruth Marcus, "that only four of 23 Cabinet-level staff members are women, half the number of the first Obama Cabinet? How can it be, in 2017, that of Trump's 42 nominees for U.S. attorney positions, only one is female?"

The challenges from today's bigmouths are being served up with irritating spin.

Nearly a decade before Serena and Venus Williams were born, Billie Jean King was ridiculed for daring to suggest that women could draw audiences on the tennis court. Just recently, the Twitterverse erupted over the presence of Beth Mowins, the first woman to call a Monday Night Football game. Most of the criticism was about - you guessed it - her voice, something many men think many women can never get right.

Or, as the once-discredited Brian Williams ineptly asked a guest on MSNBC, starting off a segment on Hillary Clinton's just-aired interview with Rachel Maddow about her new memoir, "Is she more strident than what you are used to?"

Seriously?

Never mind what's inside the book. The very existence of What Happened has been questioned. "Was this book necessary?" asked Los Angeles Times columnist Doyle McManus. Better, he advised, to have stowed it "in a desk drawer."

Fox News's Greg Gutfeld snarled, "She's past her sale date," adding that Clinton should "shut up and go away." One week later, the book leapt to the top of the best-seller list.

Others have criticized the former secretary of state and presidential candidate for using the book to blame her loss on sexism. For not being angry enough that Trump beat her. One Twitter response captured the eternal Rorschach she represents: "Why isn't Hillary angrier? Why isn't Hillary taller? Why isn't Hillary a dinner plate?"

Me? What I've read reveals a more liberated and spirited woman than we've seen, with some l'esprit de l'escalier revelations that remind me what we missed. I lament that Clinton did not go with her gut during that second presidential debate - when Donald Trump invaded her space and stalked her like a bad dream - and say what we all felt: "Back up, you creep. Get away from me."

It's all frustratingly familiar, but this time, the over-the-hill clown won.

Billie Jean King, a devoted reader of history, believes progress in women's equality, like everything else, is cyclical. "Every generation has to do it themselves," she told me. "The pendulum is always swinging back and forth."

And misogyny, she says, starts at the top. "When the leaders are sexist it allows people to be mean again. And I don't like it."

She didn't need to specify the abominable treatment of women and women's issues from the leader-in-chief - the man whose own vulgarity and cheesy talk has slapped a PG-13 rating on presidential comments, enabling boors like Fox Sports analyst Clay Travis to say on CNN: "I believe in only two things completely: the First Amendment and boobs."

When the stunned anchor, Brooke Baldwin, finally processed what she'd heard, she pulled the plug on the interview.

It would be a stretch to compare every tiny such act of rebellion to the game-changing smashes Billie Jean King has made for women in sports, but that's how it works. One point, or step, at a time. The will to fight back. The vision to make it happen. Like the woman waving her "Billie Jean for President" sign after the 1973 triumph.

If only.

I asked King which part of the film - a biopic, she points out, not a documentary - most affected her.

"That time right after the match when I cried," she tells me, citing a scene where Emma-Stone-as-Billie-Jean steals off to the locker room for a gut-spilling sob after her deeply emotional path to victory.

In real life, "I wasn't allowed to do that," she reminds me. There was the trophy presentation. And the press. And the hoopla. "But I really wanted that time, alone."

It's an important lesson. Revolution takes guts, as well as a village. And the ability to break through even the most offensive opposition.

In the movie, a sports reporter asks King if she has "any last words" before the match. "I'm done talking," she replies. "Let's play."

Game on.

*

Trailer.

-

This post first appeared on BillMoyers.com. Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:08 AM | Permalink

The [Tuesday] Papers

Breakfast Club Chicago.

#BreakastClubChicago at @wizardworld #wizardworldchicago #rocknroll

A post shared by @gboozell on

*

Don't go chasing waterfalls.

*

Crooks and castles.

*

Law enforcement for justice.

*

Renegades of Funk for Puerto Rico and Mexico.

*

At ease.

*

Puerto Rico.

#flicksonflash #chicagolife #chicagograffiti #projectloganchicago #projectlogan #paintlogansquare

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

-

Battle Of The Sexes
Then and now.

-

BeachBook

IHSA Stopped PED Testing Program 2 Years Ago And Didn't Tell Anyone.

*

LifeLock Capitalizing On Equifax Breach, But Has A Secret!

*

Women Getting 'Younger And Dumber' In Ads.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Sticking to Tronc.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:09 AM | Permalink

How To Harvest And Process Wisconsin's Edible Tree Nuts

Foraging for fallen nuts in autumn can be a fun hobby and provides an excellent learning opportunity for kids to connect with nature. Common nut trees in the urban landscape such as black walnuts, hickories, butternut and filbert (also called American hazelnut) not only provide shade and aesthetic beauty, but their mast also offers people a good source of nutritional value in the form of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E. Tree nuts also provide an excellent food habitat for many types of wildlife, especially those greedy gray squirrels that tend to gather and bury their haul for winter supplies.

gardening-autumn-treenuts-harvest-walnuts.jpgWalnuts are washed at Wisconsin's Wilson State Nursery in Boscobel/Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

People who are interested in picking tree nuts to eat can follow a few general suggestions that may help extract a high quality harvest. Each autumn, the top priority is to gather fallen nuts as quick as possible before they start to rot or get picked up by critters.

gardening-autumn-treenuts-harvest-hickorynuts-chipmunk.jpgA chipmunk hoards hickory nuts for the winter ahead/Alan Wolf (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Black Walnut And Butternut

To get a good quality kernel from black walnuts, it's important to remove husks and cure their meats properly. However, removing the husk of a black walnut is no easy task. The stains from black walnut husks can create permanent marks on clothes and tools, so rubber or plastic waterproof gloves should be worn when handling them.

gardening-autumn-treenuts-blackwalnut.jpgBlack walnut/Dan Mullen (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The husk of black walnuts can be removed by using a hand-operated corn sheller or by soaking in a pail of water and then peeling the husks by hand or driving over them with a large vehicle. After removing husks, the nuts should be rinsed outside with a garden hose. Subsequent soaking of black walnuts in a pail of water will reveal the quality of the kernel; good quality nuts typically sink to the bottom, whereas poor quality nuts float to the top and should be discarded.

Removed husks and poor quality nuts should not be tossed into a compost bin, as they exude a toxic chemical called juglone, which can inhibit the growth of other garden plants.

After the black walnuts are washed, they need to be cured to develop flavor and be readied for better storage. They can be stacked in shallow layers up to three nuts deep, or spread apart in a single layer if there are only a few. The nuts should be allowed to cure in a cool, dry ventilated area like a garage for two weeks, away from direct sunlight and not accessible by squirrels. A hammer can be used to crack open the nuts and extract the nutmeat, which can be stored in the freezer.

gardening-autumn-treenuts-butternut.jpgButternut/Dan Mullen (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Butternuts are processed in the same fashion.

Hickory Nuts

After the prompt harvest of hickory nuts, they should be allowed to dry in a shaded area for a few days. Unlike black walnuts, the husk of the hickory nut breaks open easily. To sort out the good quality kernels, the nuts should be soaked in a pail of water and the poor quality kernels that float to the top discarded. The kernels can be cracked open with a hammer, and the good quality shelled nutmeats should be stored in a cool, ventilated place.

gardening-autumn-treenuts-shagbarkhickorynut.jpgShagbark Hickory Nut/Dan Mullen (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Filberts

The nuts of filberts, also called American hazelnuts, generally drop freely without remaining attached to their husks. Mature filberts that are harvested from bushes before they drop naturally may need to be dried in a shaded area for a few days before they can be separated from their husks. The good quality kernels should be separated from the bad ones using the water sorting method, and then air dried for a few days before being stored in a cool dry place.

gardening-autumn-treenuts-americanhazelnut.jpgFilbert (or American Hazelnut)/Dan Mullen (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Of course, tree nuts can be planted as well as eaten. For seed propagation, tree nuts need a cold treatment process called stratification where the nuts are exposed to a chilling temperature range from 33 to 41 degrees Fahrenheit for a three- to four-month period. To accomplish this, in mid to late fall, after the husks are removed, the nuts should be spread out in a 1 to 2 feet deep pit and buried with sand, compost or fallen leaves. The pit should be covered with one quarter inch wire mesh or a screen to protect the nuts from rodents. The edges of the mesh should be buried to at least 6 inches into the ground.

In early spring when the ground starts to thaw, the stratified nuts can be removed and planted 1 to 2 inches deep in a desired spot. When growing black walnuts, typically half of the nuts planted will germinate in the first year, while the remaining should follow in subsequent years. The time required for germination varies from species to species.

Vijai Pandian is a horticultural agent and educator for the University of Wisconsin-Extension Brown County. This article is adapted from an item originally published by the Green Bay Press Gazette which then appeared on WisContext which produced the article in a partnership between Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Public Television and Cooperative Extension.

-

Previously in Wisconsin:

* Wisconsin Cheese Production Continues To Grow.

* Wisconsin's Specialty Cheesemakers May Be Better Off Than Other States.

* Tips For Growing Blueberries In Wisconsin.

* Amid A Boom, Wisconsin Cranberry Growers Look To Future Markets.

* The Top 10 Wisconsin Insect Trends Of 2016.

* Wisconsin's Penokees Are A Geologic Gem.

* Wisconsin Researchers Aim To Make Cows Happier.

* Wisconsin And The Extinction Of The Passenger Pigeon.

* The Life Of Land After Frac Sand.

* Blueberry Maggot Fly Poised To Expand In Wisconsin.

* Efforts To Boost Marten Numbers In Wisconsin Meet Ongoing Failure.

* How To Raise A Pizza.

* RECALL! Wisconsin Pork Sausage Patties.

* Making The Most Of Wisconsin's Autumn Garden Harvest.

* Who Is Stealing Wisconsin's Birch?

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:05 AM | Permalink

September 25, 2017

The [Monday] Papers

David Kaplan makes it clear he's sticking to sports.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

New On Today's Beachwood

-

-

-

-

-

-

BeachBook

Crooked White Cop Befriends The Innocent Black Man He Framed.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Your heritage.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 3:31 PM | Permalink

Quimby's Adult Thrillers!

It's a mad, mad, nymphomaniacal world.

"Best day at work ever" says @corinnehalbert #quimbys #quimbysbookstorechicago Screw newspapers, classic! $3-$5.

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

*

#quimbys #quimbysbookstorechicago Screw newspapers, classic! $3-$5.

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

*

#quimbys

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

*

#quimbys

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

*

#quimbys

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

*

Yassss

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

*

#quimbys #quimbysbookstorechicago

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

*

#quimbys #quimbysbookstorechicago

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

-

For sale now!

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:16 PM | Permalink

There Is No Rehabilitating The Vietnam War

Since the day it ended, in 1975, there have been efforts to rehabilitate the Vietnam War - to make it acceptable, even honorable. After all, there were so many sides to the story, weren't there? It was so complex, so nuanced. There was real heroism among the troops.

Of course, all of this is true, but it's true of every war so it doesn't redeem any war. The Vietnam War is beyond redemption and must be remembered and condemned for the calamity that it was. The Vietnam War was "one of the greatest American foreign policy disasters of the 20th century."

Those are not the words of a leftist pundit or a scribbling anti-American. They are the words of H.R. McMaster, the sitting National Security Advisor to the President of the United States.

Why must Vietnam be remembered and condemned for the debacle it actually was?

First, the U.S. betrayed its own ideals in the war. In 1946, Vietnamese president Ho Chi Minh approached U.S. president Harry Truman asking for the U.S.'s help in evicting the French, who had occupied Vietnam as a colony since the 1860s. Hadn't the U.S. itself once fought a war of independence to rid itself of European colonial domination?

Indeed, the opening words to the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence were borrowed in sacramental reverence from the American Declaration. They echo to every patriotic American: "All men are created equal. They are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, and among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."

But Ho was a communist. So, Truman turned him down and helped the French instead. That was the "original sin" that made it impossible for the U.S. to ever "win the hearts and minds" of the Vietnamese people. It is what ultimately doomed the war to failure. But that wasn't the only cardinal sin the U.S. committed against its own putative ideals.

Eisenhower violated the 1954 Geneva accords that had settled the war with the French and set up a puppet regime in the south. Hence "South" Vietnam, which, not surprisingly, quickly disappeared once the Americans left. He forced a wealthy Catholic mandarin from New Jersey - Ngo Diem - on the people who were overwhelmingly poor and Buddhist.

Diem, with Eisenhower's blessing, then boycotted the elections for national unification that had been agreed to in the accords. Eisenhower wrote later that the reason for the boycott was that "Our guys would have lost." When Diem could no longer suppress the swelling rebellion against his divisive, hyper-oppressive rule, Kennedy had him assassinated.

Second, the U.S. carried out apocalyptic violence on Vietnam, vastly beyond any conceivable moral standard of proportionality. It dropped three times more tons of bombs on Vietnam than were used by all sides in all theaters in all of World War II combined. Vietnam is about the size of New Mexico, and at the time had a population greater than New York and California put together.

The U.S. lost 58,000 lives in the war. But more than 4 million southeast Asians - Vietnamese, Cambodians, Laotians - were killed, most of them civilians. That's 69 Southeast Asians killed for every American. That is not a war. That is a massacre, and on a scale approaching the Holocaust.

The U.S. sprayed 21 million gallons of carcinogenic defoliants on Vietnam, including the notorious Agent Orange. More than half of the nation's forests were destroyed. Vietnam was the greatest intentionally man-made environmental catastrophe in the history of the world. Children are still being born with birth defects from the residual poisoning.

The U.S. dropped 270 million cluster bombs on neighboring Laos, which, in 1965 had a population of 2.4 million. That's 113 cluster bombs for every man, woman and child in the country. More than 80 million of the bombs are still unexploded today.

Finally, the war was founded on and prosecuted with relentless lying. Your mother once taught you, as all good mothers do, that if you have to lie about something it's wrong.

The intelligence agencies lied to us, unremittingly, about the threat from a nation of pre-Industrial Age farmers on the other side of the world.

Five successive presidents lied to the American people about the need for the war and its winnability. None of them wanted to appear to be "soft on communism." None wanted to be "the first American president to lose a war."

The Pentagon Papers revealed that the military was saturated with lies, from field level body counts to strategic reviews of progress. Truth-tellers were drummed out of the service, ensuring that only lies got passed up the chain. The lies wouldn't be discovered until it was too late.

In fact, it is precisely our lying about the Vietnam War, both then and now, and our knowledge of those lies, without ever having openly, unambiguously repudiated them, that continues to make the war dishonorable.

The dishonor, of course, belongs not to the millions of soldiers who served there but rather to the war itself. It belongs to the institutions - both public and private - that profited from the war and lied to justify it, and to the people whose silence and knowing acquiescence made them complicit in the lies.

It belongs to those who put our soldiers - our children - in the perverse situation not of doing honorable things honorably, but of having to try to do dishonorable things honorably. For, despite the loftiest motives we might invent for its beginnings, that is unquestionably what the war ultimately became.

In March 1965, before the insertion of American ground troops that would make the war irreversible, before the vast majority of the bombings and killings would be perpetrated, a Pentagon briefing for Johnson stated that the true goals in the War were, " . . . 70% to avoid a humiliating U.S. defeat; 20% to keep South Vietnam (and adjacent territories) from Chinese hands; and 10% to permit the people of Vietnam a better, freer way of life."

That is what the psychotic savagery of Vietnam was all about. It was not bumbling goodwill gone awry, as the rehabilitationists would have us believe. It was not to bring democracy to the Vietnamese people, nor to defend against communism. It was "to avoid a humiliating U.S. defeat." Those are the official, though at the time secret, words of the U.S. government.

We can summon an even greater authority than H.R. McMaster to confirm that the war was wrong. Robert McNamara was the U.S. Secretary of Defense in both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. He is the unquestioned architect and chief strategist of the war.

In his memoirs, McNamara wrote, "We of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations who participated in the decisions on Vietnam acted according to what we thought were the principles and traditions of this nation. We made our decisions in light of those values. Yet we were wrong, terribly wrong. We owe it to future generations to explain why."

There are no two more disparate authorities on the war than these two men. They represent the old and the new, Democrat and Republican, civilian and soldier, actor and critic, introspective and retrospective. Yet they reach the same, damning conclusion.

There is enormous pressure and a lot of money working to rehabilitate Vietnam - to put the guilt and the shame of it behind us. But it was precisely the guilt of the people, their shame at what was being done in their name, and their courage to denounce it that made it impossible for their government to carry out the savagery any longer. Would that we had that kind of guilt, shame, and courage among us today.

Remember: If we had to lie about it, it was wrong. That is as true today as it was then, is it not? And wrong does not get made right by the louder or repeated repetition of original lies. Or, by the artful contrivance of newer, slicker, more personable ones.

Forgetting that lesson, or, worse, laundering it out of our memory so that we might go forward with cleansed consciences and fortified zeal for still more predation, would be a betrayal of itself that only the American people can resist.

Robert Freeman is the author of The Best One-Hour History series which includes World War I, The Vietnam War, The Cold War, and other titles. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

-

Previously:

* The Beachwood vs. Ken Burns' Vietnam.

* Comics Captured America's Growing Ambivalence About The Vietnam War.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:43 AM | Permalink

SportsMonday: Cooper's Blooper Not As Bad As You Think

Marcus Cooper did not showboat.

The Bears cornerback committed a massive blunder, the sort that goes down in the annals of greatest sports, yes, bloopers (it is indeed Cooper's Blooper - which someone else thought of well before me, let me assure you).

But he wasn't showboating after he picked up Sherrick McManis's blocked field goal as the last six seconds of the first half ticked away, sprinted almost 70 yards, and then pulled up just short of the end zone, only to have the ball swatted from his hands, costing the Bears a touchdown.

When you watch the replay, as he comes to a stop, Cooper just looks tired. He doesn't look at anyone and he doesn't start to celebrate. He was not grandstanding, he just screwed up. He started slowing down at the 10 because "I didn't hear anybody coming. It was just a mistake on my part. I didn't think anybody was that close to me."

Dunderheaded, sure ("I thought I was in," he also said) but better than the alternative of a premature celebration.

And then John Fox stepped up. There are plenty of reasons seemingly every week to disparage the veteran coach. But in this instance he gave the Bears a chance to score with his understanding of the rules and his persistence. Referee Clete Blakeman had ruled the first half over. The Steelers went to the locker room. But Fox wouldn't let the refs go and apparently convinced them they had erred in allowing the half to end on what qualified as a defensive penalty - batting a fumble out of the end zone. Despite the fact he is named Cletus by the way, Blakeman is one of the better refs in the league.

Because the play happened in the last two minutes, any yardage gained or lost on a fumble was nullified, i.e., the ball had to be returned to the spot where possession was lost. And when that was done, and it occurred to the refs that the Bears were the last team to possess it, that meant the penalty was assessed (from the 1-yard-line to the half-yard-line) and the Steelers had to return for a final untimed play before halftime.

Then the delightful Charles Leno (who was part of a promising performance by the Bears line overall) committed a brutal false start just before the Bears were about to go for the touchdown.

To tell the truth, that penalty was probably a blessing in disguise. The Bears paid a price for Cooper's you-know-what, but they still put some points on the board (which they of course wouldn't have if their initial untimed play had failed). And those points proved critical in a game that was tied at the end of regulation.

Then came by far most fun fact of the day: The Bears won the coin toss at the start of overtime for the 13th consecutive time going back to last season. I kid you not. Awesome radio play-by-play man Jeff Joniak pointed out before the game that the Bears had won 11 consecutive coin flips going into the game-opening toss with the Steelers.

Then came the Bears' game-winning drive, in which rookie phenom Tarik Cohen single-handedly forced all of the Steeler defenders to experience the sort of fatigue that Cooper experienced at the end of the first half. Jordan Howard ended up scoring the game-winning touchdown on an 18-yard run, but after the game he pointed out that the game really ended when Cohen dodged about five tackles and ran from one sideline almost to the other in the midst of what initially seemed to be a long touchdown run but which was brought back to the 37 after the refs ruled he had barely stepped out of bounds.

Even after a delay for a review, the gassed Steelers had nothing left as Howard first gained 19 yards to move into scoring range and then finished off the game with his final awesome run of a crazy afternoon.

Now the Bears have a quick turnaround to face the Packers coming on Thursday night - and no matter what President Don says, it will be Must-See TV.

-

Jim "Coach" Coffman welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:29 AM | Permalink

He's A Believer

Had the White Sox been in a pennant race, the closing play of Friday night's 7-6 victory over Kansas City would have assumed a prominent place in the team's annals.

As it was, turning a struggle that easily could have gone into extra innings into a game-ending shocker illustrated the uniqueness and unpredictability of the game of baseball. And I missed it.

Sitting in Row 11 of Section 148 down the left field line, I asked my wife Judy if she thought that the Sox, holding the slimmest of one-run leads, would have to bat in the bottom of the ninth. A reasonable question, in my view, since presumptive closer Juan Minaya - who spent seven-plus lackluster seasons in the Astros' farm system before the Sox claimed him off waivers 15 months ago - was summoned by manager Ricky Renteria to silence the Royals before the 18,041 observers on Hispanic Heritage Night could enjoy the fireworks show.

Judy indicated that she would need to use the ladies' room before we departed, so after Minaya struck out Alex Gordon to lead off the ninth, I suggested that she visit the comfort station and meet me at the top of the aisle after Minaya recorded his sixth save.

There I sat, alone, thinking that this truly could happen until Whit Merrifield rifled a line drive single to left. Doubts crept in. With Lorenzo Cain batting, Merrifield stole second.

"This could last all night," I thought, noting that the time was approaching 10:30. "No way I'm sitting here for extra innings."

This negativity, this mistrust, is not unfounded. It has developed over decades in which late-inning failures have taken precedence over last-minute heroics.

Merrifield swiped second on the seventh pitch and a 2-2 count on the crafty Cain. He then fouled off the next two offerings from Minaya. I was cocksure and absolutely certain what would transpire and, sure enough, Cain sent the 10th pitch of the at-bat on a line to right field.

As soon as the ball made contact with the grass, I turned into the aisle, my back to the field, and started up the stairs. After three or four steps, the crowd was stirring, alive, cheering. What possibly could be happening? I turned in time to see catcher Omar Narvaez throw a perfect strike to Yoan Moncada, who threw to shortstop Tim Anderson at second base. Anderson deftly caught the ball on a bounce in time to tag out the sliding Cain.
I remained unconvinced. Surely Merrifield had already scored the tying run. I continued up the steps. But wait. The Sox were merrily walking off the field.

By now the paltry band of Sox faithful knows that Avisail Garcia, even though he stumbled slightly, came up throwing in time to nail Merrifield at the plate before Cain was eliminated on the bases. How did I discover these facts? I've watched the replay at least a dozen times.

We never are too old to learn, and I am finding out that this edition of the White Sox are young, capable, athletic and energetic. Forget that they're 29 games below .500. In September the ledger reads 11-12, which might not be noteworthy until you consider that in the previous four months the team posted a 39-70 mark.

With seven games remaining and 92 losses, these Sox can't lose 100 games. They've vaulted past Detroit into fourth place in the Central Division. They run out every ground ball. Garcia will finish with the second-highest batting average in all of baseball. His 12 assists - he threw out two runners at home on Friday - are two more than any right fielder in the game. Jose Abreu has joined Joe DiMaggio and Albert Pujols as the only players in history with at least 25 home runs (he has 31) and 100 RBI (he got his 100th on Saturday) their first four seasons.

Moncada lined a shot over the centerfield wall Friday night with a man on, which turned out to be the game-winner. He still strikes out too often, but this kid is everything he's cracked up to be. Stretching this season's numbers over 162 games, Moncada would have 23 home runs and 67 RBI with a .235 average. He going to be way better than that. Keep in mind he's just 22-years-old.

Anderson has a 15-game hitting streak in which he's batting .415. He still leads everyone with 26 errors, but he's made just one in September. Yolmer Sanchez has driven in 56 runs. Prior to the season, he wasn't even guaranteed a spot on the roster. Matt Davidson is hitting only .223, but he's slugged 26 homers and driven in 67. The catching duo of Narvaez and Kevan Smith are hitting a combined .278 and have shown improvement defensively. Narvaez has thrown out 24 percent of would-be base stealers, which is about the MLB average of 26 percent.

Reynaldo Lopez pitched into the seventh inning Friday, his fifth straight start of at least six innings. The Royals roughed him up for 10 hits and scored six times (two runs earned) in the third inning. However, the key to Lopez's third win was that he didn't walk anyone. The kid throws strikes.

Lucas Giolito kept up his eye-opening, late-season showing on Sunday by limiting the Royals to a lone run on Cain's solo homer in seven innings of work. He yielded just five hits and, like Lopez, didn't issue a base on balls. Young pitchers simply aren't supposed to do that.

Please be assured that I didn't trip on those stairs Friday, hitting my head and turning into an imbecile. This team remains one of the worst in baseball as far as won-loss records are concerned.

However, consider that 16 players from the Opening Day roster are disabled or have been traded. Only James Shields and Dylan Covey - a duo that doesn't exactly strike fear into the hearts of opposing hitters - remain from the pitching staff of 12 back on April 4.

Four games at home against the Angels before a trio of contests in Cleveland will close out this campaign, one of the more interesting in recent years. This ballclub is a far cry from Robin Ventura's White Sox.

And I won't be turning my back to the field and heading for the exit any time soon until I'm sure of the outcome.

-

Former Bill Veeck bar buddy Roger Wallenstein is our White Sox correspondent. He welcomes your comments.

-

1. From Lynn Tsuma:

You should never turn your back on this team. They have surprised me at every turn since the break. I love watching them! They have a spark in them that has been missing since the WS. They have fielding lapses sometimes but they make so many heads-up plays that their lapses are quickly forgiven. All they need is pitching and we might see another trophy in our life - that is if Trump doesn't get us killed first.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:06 AM | Permalink

Rauner Vetoes Your Online Privacy

The private online information of Illinoisans took a major hit after Gov. Bruce Rauner rejected House Bill 3449, the Geolocation Privacy Protection Act. Had it been signed into law, this historic piece of legislation would have provided transparency by requiring corporations that collect, use or sell Illinoisans' geolocation information from their mobile devices to obtain their consent before tracking them.

Instead, Rauner's veto is a betrayal of consumer trust and total failure to people who value their personal privacy. Rauner's action is a clear message that he values his Silicon Valley friends more than the people and small businesses in Illinois.

"You can throw all the money in the world at a problem, but we can't actually protect ourselves if we aren't aware that our geolocation information is being collected, used and sold to begin with," said Digital Privacy Alliance board member Peter Hanna. "By vetoing this legislation, Governor Rauner signals to all Illinoisans that their privacy rights aren't as important as big business profits."

House Bill 3449 is a common sense consumer protection measure that simply requires a person or corporation to get consent before tracking someone through his or her mobile device. Current law does not require a corporation to be transparent about when and why they are tracking you and your personal data, which has led to the erosion of consumer trust in technology.

Such corporate disregard for consumers' privacy was recently highlighted by a report exposing the mobile app AccuWeather for continuing to collect and share location information even though a user previously denied the app's request for access to that information.

The industry's lack of transparency also threatens our physical safety. Just this past July, the FBI warned parents that the collection of personal information from connected devices posed privacy and physical safety threats to children.

A national study conducted by the National Network to End Domestic Violence found that 72 percent of victim services programs across the country had seen victims who were tracked through a stalking app installed on a mobile phone or a stand-alone GPS device, and the Washington Post revealed that half of the 2,500 children's apps it tested failed to protect their data.

The dozens of tech start-ups, enterprise software companies, and web development shops around the state that have stepped up in support of the Geolocation Privacy Protection Act believe it is necessary for the protection of citizens' privacy rights and critical for ensuring consumer trust in their industry.

"Trust is a completely undervalued commodity in today's digitally dominated world and trust is eroding every day," said Derek Eder, partner at DataMade, co-founder of Open City, and leader of Chi Hack Night. "If we, as an industry, don't start regaining the trust of our consumers, we won't have a strong base to work with. Illinois could be at the forefront of this movement and this act is a good move to start regaining that trust."

The diverse advocacy groups that have rallied behind the bill include the Digital Privacy Alliance, American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois, Center for Democracy & Technology, Illinois PIRG, Chicago Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation, Cook County Sheriff's Office, Social Change and Illinois Attorney General's office.

"Signing this bill into law would have been a clear demonstration that Illinois is a progressive leader in the technology industry and is forward thinking," said director of Illinois PIRG Abe Scarr. "Unfortunately, the Governor chose big business over the protection of Illinois citizens."

-

See also:

* Tribune: Rauner Vetoes Geolocation Privacy Bill Aimed At Protecting Smartphone Users.

* Sun-Times: Rauner Vetoes Smartphone Location Tracking Privacy Bill.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:07 AM | Permalink

Chicagoetry: Black Jeans In White Tel Aviv

Black Jeans in White Tel Aviv

I wore black jeans
In White Tel Aviv
Before teleporting to

Ponder the dusk of Tuscany.
You could dam the Mississippi
With the jeans I can no longer wear.

Enough about today!
Listening to dancers,
Ahead on rent,

Sustaining the loving lie,
The one that spares the beloved.
As if, during a recession, you stage a World's Fair

And are desperate

For begonias. Who is starving
While you "need" begonias?
I thought I "needed" black jeans

For White Tel Aviv.
I wanted my fat ass
To look good as can be.

I needed black jeans in White Tel Aviv
Like Olmstead needed begonias.

Life is a knife

That slices through calf muscle
Laming the dancers
You hear so clearly when you close your gilded eyes.

Life is a knife that cuts your black jeans
Into shorts, that cuts the bloom off
The gilded begonias,

That spoils the dusk
Of Tuscany that you worked a year's worth
Of overtime to witness.

You could dam the Mississippi
With the ruined sunsets at Tuscany.
It is life,

Not God. Not God,
But the knife.
And if you can actually hear dancing,

You are God.
Not exclusive to Tel Aviv
Or Tuscany or the Mississippi.

Sunset in Winfield
Has much to recommend it.
That romanticizing Tuscany shit

Is all in the mind
Which is as close to Winfield
As Tuscany.

The American mind,
That is.

-

J.J. Tindall is the Beachwood's poet-in-residence. He welcomes your comments. Chicagoetry is an exclusive Beachwood collection-in-progress.

-

More Tindall:

* Chicagoetry: The Book

* Ready To Rock: The Music

* Kindled Tindall: The Novel

* The Viral Video: The Match Game Dance

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:26 AM | Permalink

September 22, 2017

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #170: Joe Maddon's Magical Mystery Tour

Pulling Strings, Pushing Tin. Plus: Maddon's Musical Chairs; The White Sox Are Still Playing - Some Of Them Well!; Extend The Freakin' Nets Already; The Blackhawks' Very Short Preseason Is Underway And Almost Over; Hey, Doug Collins Is Back; Schweinsteiger!; Bears Barf; and Aaron Hernandez, 12-Year-Olds & CTE.


-

SHOW NOTES

* 170.

:45: Pulling Strings, Pushing Tin.

* That Game.

But . . .

And . . .

27:28: Maddon's Musical Chairs.

* Andracki: Joe Maddon Has No Intention Of Playing Albert Almora Jr. More.

* Doolittle: Cubs' Lineup Puzzle Keeps Getting More Complicated.

* Jason Heyward's WAR this season is 0.9. He's a -8.8 offensively, and a 2.8 defensively.

* NOTE: Rhodes disagrees with Coffman on the value of corner outfield defense; Heyward has four Gold Gloves and a shit-ton of defensive runs saved. Doesn't mean he shouldn't sit at times, but not ready put him on the scrap heap either.

43:03: The White Sox Are Still Playing - Some Of Them Well!

44:12: Extend The Freakin' Nets Already!

47:37: The Blackhawks' Very Short Preseason Is Underway And Almost Over!

* Schmaltz, Saad Shine.

* Alex DeBrincat Pushing For Roster Spot.

49:46: Hey, Doug Collins Is Back!

* Johnson: Bulls Open To Buying Out Dwyane Wade - At Their Price.

55:57: Schweinsteiger!

* Calf Injury Could Keep Bastian Schweinsteiger Out Of 3rd Straight Fire Game.

56:53: Former Sky Player Not Named Elena Delle Donne Wins League MVP - Chicago Team Once Had Them Both.

57:29: The Best College Football Program In Illinois Keeps Humming.

* Huskies Get Nebraska AD Fired.

1:00:13 Bears Barf.

* Unknown: The Bears may have to pass up a QB prospect in the first round of the coming draft who is better than Trubisky!

* Cahill: Stats Show Glennon Every Bit Worse Than You Think.

* Biggs: Ugh.

* Jeremy Langford From Ravens' Practice Squad To IR.

* Jacquizz Rodgers The Bucs' Main Back.

* Benny Cunningham Practiced Thursday For The Bears.

* Dear Dan Wiederer And Jim Coffman: The Bears Have No Chance To Beat The Steelers, C'mon!

* Bears Savior Tanner Gentry Clears Waivers - Again - And Is Re-Signed To The Practice Squad!

* Lance Briggs Now Member Of Media Contingent Preaching Accountability.

1:16:49: Aaron Hernandez, 12-Year-Olds And CTE.

-

STOPPAGE: 22:10

-

For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 3:17 PM | Permalink

Jackson Park Community Football Team Holds What They Fear Will Be Their Final Homecoming Game On Field Where Obama Library Set To Be Built

The Wolfpack is a community football team that plays on the field in Jackson Park where the Obama Library will be located, at 61st and Stony Island.

On Sunday at 2:30 p.m. they will be playing their 20th - and what might be their last - homecoming game there.

The Wolfpack is a member of the Obama Library Community Benefits Agreement Coalition.

"Once our field is displaced there will greater demand for less field space, which could push us out of the park," said Wolfpack head coach Ernest Radcliff.

"That is why we are asking for a written Community Benefits Agreement that will put in writing the commitment to replace and improve the parkland and sports fields that we have used for two decades.

"Just like a church, that field is our sanctuary, its where we do mentoring with youth and parents."

Thousands of youth have participated in the Wolfpack Athletic Program over its 20-year history.

The Homecoming will include games for 7- to 9-year-olds starting at 10 a.m., 10- to 11-year-olds starting at 11:30 a.m., 12- to 13-year-olds starting at 1 p.m., and the main event for 13- to 14-year-olds starting at 2:30 p.m.

They are calling this 20th, and maybe last, homecoming in Jackson Park "The Last Ride."

*

The Wolfpack is a member of the Obama Library CBA Coalition, which is led by the Bronzeville Regional Collective (BRC), Kenwood Oakland Community Org. (KOCO), Prayer and Action Collective (PAC), Southside Together Organizing Power (STOP) - with Chicago Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights.

Allied with Alliance of the Southeast (ASE), Brighton Park Neighborhood Council (BPNC), Chicago Jobs Council (CJC), Chicago Women in Trades (CWIT), Metropolitan Tenants Organization (MTO), Showing up for Racial Justice (SURJ), the Wolfpack, Woodlawn East Community And Neighbors (WECAN).

-

See also:

* CBS 2: Obama Library May Displace Young Athletes In Jackson Park.

And:

* Tribune: In Jackson Park, Private Money Begins To Reshape A Public Jewel:

Young football players from some of the city's most violent neighborhoods huddled with their coach in Jackson Park, their white helmets and red jerseys glowing beneath the playing field's high-intensity lamps.

Champions in their local league, the 13- and 14-year-olds in the Wolfpack team had four days to practice for a regional competition in Tennessee. "I don't have time to be playing around," coach Ernest Radcliffe told his team at a recent practice. "If you don't listen, you go home. Hey, let's go. One lap."

For Radcliffe, who has been molding athletes at this site for nearly two decades, the clock is ticking - not just for the next trophy but for the future of his youth sports program.

In a few years, the field where the Wolfpack practices and other parts of Jackson Park are expected to be taken over by a wave of development, including, most notably, the Obama presidential library.

-

Previously:

* Why No Community Benefits Agreement For The Obama Library?

* Rhymefest Leads Obama Library CBA Effort.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:28 PM | Permalink

Study: Youth Football Linked To Adult Problems

A new study has found an association between participation in youth tackle football before age 12 and impaired mood and behavior later in life. The study appears in Translational Psychiatry.

Researchers from Boston University's Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center studied 214 former American football players, including 43 who played only through high school and 103 who played only through college.The average age of the former players at the time of the study was 51.

Participants received telephone-administered cognitive tests and completed online measures of depression, behavioral regulation, apathy and executive functioning (initiating activity, problem-solving, planning and organization).

Results from former players who started playing tackle football before the age of 12 were compared against those of participants who started playing at age 12 or later.

The study showed that participation in youth football before age 12 increased the risk of problems with behavioral regulation, apathy and executive functioning by two-fold and increased the risk of clinically elevated depression scores by three-fold.

The increased risk was independent of the total number of years the participants played football, the number of concussions they reported, or whether they played through high school, college or professionally.

The researchers chose the cutoff of age 12 because the brain undergoes a key period of development and maturation between the years 10-12 in males. They examined other age cutoffs as well, though the age 12 cutoff led to the most robust findings. In addition, even when a specific age cutoff was not used, younger age of first exposure to football was associated with worse clinical function.

The new study follows previous research from the BU CTE Center that examined former professional players. In those studies, the former NFL players who started tackle football prior to age 12 had worse memory and mental flexibility, as well as structural brain changes on MRI scans, compared to former players who began at age 12 or older.

"This study adds to growing research suggesting that incurring repeated head impacts through tackle football before the age of 12 can lead to a greater risk for short- and long-term neurological consequences," said Michael Alosco, PhD, lead author of the study and a post-doctoral fellow at Boston University School of Medicine.

However, more research on this topic is needed before any recommendations on policy or rule changes can be made, said corresponding author Robert Stern, PhD, professor of neurology, neurosurgery and anatomy and neurobiology at BUSM.

*

The researchers point out there are many important health and psychosocial benefits of participating in athletics and team sports during pre-adolescence.

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Harvard University also participated in this study.

This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health. This publication also was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH, through BUCTSI, as well as the Concussion Legacy Foundation. Michael L. Alosco and research reported in this publication are supported by a Pilot Grant from the Boston University Alzheimer's Disease Center, and the NIH/NINDS.

-

See also: Playing Tackle Football Before 12 Is Tied to Brain Problems Later.

-

And: BU CTE Center Statement on Aaron Hernandez.

-

Previously in concussions:
* Bob Probert's Broken Brain.

* NFL Players Killing Themselves Because They Miss Football So Much.

* The College Football Report: Dementia Pugilistica.

* Blackhawks Playing Head Games.

* Jay Cutler Should Consider Retiring.

* Dislike: Friday Night Tykes.

* Hurt And Be Hurt: The Lessons Of Youth Sports.

* Chicago Soccer Player Patrick Grange Had CTE.

* Sony Softened Concussion To Placate NFL.

* Ultra-Realistic Madden To Simulate Game's Debilitating Concussions.

* Dear Football: I'm Breaking Up With You.

* Dead College Football Player's Brain Leaves Clues Of Concussions' Toll On Brain.

* More Bad Concussion News For Young Football Players.

* NFL Tried To Fix Concussion Study.

* The Week In Concussions: Another Enforcer Down.

* Teen Concussion Rate Rising Significantly.

* Conflict Of Interest For NFL Doctors To Report To Teams: Harvard Study.

* U.S. Supreme Court Ends Fight Over $1 Billion NFL Concussion Deal.

* U.S. High School Soccer Concussions On The Rise.

* Youth Football Finally Listening To Coach Coffman.

* Many Kids Still Don't Report Concussion Symptoms. How Can We Change That?

* Brain Damage In Former Players Fuels Soccer 'Heading' Fears.

* Canadian Youth Hockey Injuries Cut In Half After National Policy Change.

* More Teen Knowledge About Concussion May Not Increase Reporting.

* High School Boys Fear Looking 'Weak' If They Report Concussions.

* Pro Flag Football Is Now A Thing - Starring Former NFL Players!

* Nearly All Donated NFL Brains Found To Have CTE.

* Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions.

* Whoa. Perhaps The Smartest Player In NFL History - He's In Math PhD Program At MIT - Assesses Situation And Decides To Save His Brain.

* Study: CTE Affects Football Players At All Levels.

* Dan Jiggetts Is Right About CTE.

* Letting Our Boys Onto The Football Field Is A Losing Play.

* Tackle Rings?

* CTE Season Preview.

* The CTE Diaries: The Life And Death Of A High School Football Player Killed By Concussions.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:26 AM | Permalink

24 Hours With WYCC

"After 34 years as the City Colleges of Chicago's public television station, WYCC-Channel 20 will be going off the air," Robert Feder notes. "But it's no surprise. The decision was prompted by the sale of its broadcast license in the FCC spectrum auction in April."

If I recall correctly, the idea of the city selling off WYCC's license originated with Feder; he at least lobbied for it. Which makes me sad, because WYCC offers quality public programming that I find consistently more interesting than the WTTW lineup. Let's take a look within the confines of our "24 Hours With . . . " series, starting Friday afternoon.

5 p.m.: Insight

5:30 p.m.: Nightly Business Report

6 p.m.: Charlie Rose - 9/21 New

7 p.m.: W1A - Episode 1

7:30 p.m.: Songs at the Center

8 p.m.: Austin City Limits - 2015 Hall of Fame Special

9 p.m.: Live From the Artists Den - Young the Giant at the El Rey in Los Angeles

10 p.m.: DW News

10:30 p.m.: Tavis Smiley - Steve Cohen; Sonequa Martin-Green

11 p.m.: Charlie Rose - 9/22 New

Midnight: Democracy Now!

1 a.m.: The Whole Truth With David Eisenhower - Feminism at Home and Around the World, in the Age of Trump

1:30 a.m.: British Antiques Roadshow - Kirby Hall 2

2 a.m.: And God Created Woman

4 a.m.: The Factory

4:30 a.m.: Words on the Wind

5 a.m.: The Smartest Team: Making High School Football Safer

6 a.m.: Doctor Who - The Hand of Fear

7:33 a.m.: Doctor Who - The Awakening

8:22 a.m.: Doctor Who - The Two Doctors

10:06 a.m.: Doctor Who - The Two Doctors

10:32 a.m.: Mid-American Gardener

11 a.m.: Garden Smart - Episode 4811 New

11:30 a.m.: P. Allen Smith's Garden to Table - Farming With Water

Noon: Outdoor Wisconsin

12:30 p.m.: This Old House - Arlington Arts & Crafts: An Arts & Craft for the Ages

1 p.m.: American Woodshop - Curio Cabinet

1:30 p.m.: Rough Cut: Woodworking With Tommy Mac - Spice Box With Glen Huey

2 p.m.: The Woodwright's Shop - Holly Wood Spectaculars

2:30 p.m.: Woodsmith Shop - Demilune Table

3 p.m.: Ask This Old House - Build It, Lighting, Mousetrap

3:30 p.m.: Fly Tying: The Angler's Art - Stoat's Tail, Poly Royal, Maggot, Six-Pack

4 p.m.: Focus on Europe

4:30 p.m.: Washington Week - 9/22 New

5 p.m.: Antiques Roadshow - Cincinnati

-

Previously:
* 24 Hours With QVC
* 24 Hours With Tru TV
* 24 Hours With Current TV
* 24 Hours With The Military Channel
* 24 Hours With The Hallmark Channel
* 24 Hours With TVGN
* 24 Hours With Retroplex
* 24 Hours With Penthouse TV
* 24 Hours With The DIY Network
* 24 Hours With BET
* 24 Hours With CNBC
* 24 Hours With WWMEB
* 24 Hours With PRISM TV
* 24 Hours With Al Jazeera America.
* 24 Hours With Fuse.
* 24 Hours With Pop TV.
* 24 Hours With BET Soul.
* 24 Hours With BabyTV.
* 24 Hours With Jewelry Television.
* 24 Hours With XFHS.
* 24 Hours With Freeform.
* 24 Hours With Baby1.
* 24 Hours With RUS-TV.
* 24 Hours With The Esquire Network.
* 24 Hours With Velocity.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:12 AM | Permalink

The [Friday] Papers

Ends Monday.

-

New On Today's Beachwood

Beachwood Photo Booth: Mural Man.

*

Jackson Park Community Football Team Holds What They Fear Will Be Their Final Homecoming Game On Field Where Obama Library Set To Be Built.

*

24 Hours With WYCC.

*

8-Year-OIds In Belleville Take Knees.

*

Youth Football Linked To Adult Problems.

*

Why Al-Qaeda Is Still Strong.

-

In Production

* The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #170.

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #170: Joe Maddon's Magical Mystery Tour
Pulling Strings, Pushing Tin. Plus: Maddon's Musical Chairs; The White Sox Are Still Playing - Some Of Them Well!; Extend The Freakin' Nets Already; The Blackhawks' Very Short Preseason Is Underway And Almost Over; Hey, Doug Collins Is Back; Schweinsteiger!; Bears Barf; and Aaron Hernandez, 12-Year-Olds & CTE.

* The Week In Chicago Rock.

-

BeachBook

Tulip Mania Wasn't That Big Of A Deal.

*

Clear Health Costs Works With Newsrooms To Unearth Health Care Costs.

*

Your Next Hipster Coffee May Be Made By Nestle.

*

Toys R Us Is Bankrupt!

*

StoryCorps: A Model For Capturing Voices.

*

Nowhere To Go: The Bronzeville Historical Society.

*

On This Day: Chicago Media's Olympic Bid Coverage Fails Miserably.

Now they all act like they were on it . . .

*

But we remember . . .

*

Hyde Park Herald Editorial.

*

Still true.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Safe bet.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:54 AM | Permalink

Youth Football Team (8-Year-Olds) Take Knees In Belleville

"Every player on the Cahokia Quarterback Club football team (8 and under) took a knee during the national anthem ahead of Sunday's game at Little Devil's Field in Belleville," Fox 2 in St. Louis reports.

"One of the kids asked me if I saw (people) protesting and rioting in St. Louis. I said yes; I said, 'Do you know why they are doing it?'" said Coach Orlando Gooden.

Coach Gooden said his player responded, "Because black people are getting killed and nobody's going to jail."


-

Previously in Colin Kaepernick:

* Don't Be Surprised If Colin Kaepernick Prompts More Schoolchildren To Sit For The Pledge Of Allegiance.

* Why Colin Kaepernick Matters.

* Your Turn: Colin Kaepernick's Protest.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:51 AM | Permalink

Beachwood Photo Booth: Mural Man

Urban camouflage in Heartside.

muralman.jpg(ENLARGE FOR PROPER VIEWING)

-

See also: The making of the mural.

-

Editor's Note: Diehard Chicagoan Helene Smith is temporarily in residence in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

-

More Chicago photography from Helene Smith.

-

Helene on Twitter!

-

Meet Helene!

-

Stationery, iPhone cases, hoodies.

-

Listen to Helene talk about Photo Booth; starts at 57:54.

-

Previously:
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Man Grilling
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Yum Yum Donuts
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Father's Day
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vintage Airmaster
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Time
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Shade
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Illinois Slayer
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Fire Escape
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Nugget
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hollywood, Chicago
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flag Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Van In Flames.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fluid Power Automation.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Corn Dog.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop The Killing Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Backyard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A to Z Things.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Swedish Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Rothschild Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Silos.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Wires.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Orange Garden.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Irving Park Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Pigeons.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Lanagan's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: For Rent.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Pizza & Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mori Milk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Breakfast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Chicago Christmas Postcard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Harold's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Family Fun.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snow Bike.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nativity Scene.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Warsaw.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deluxe Cleaners.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Golden Cue.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Die Another Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sears Key Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jeri's Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Barry's Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Liberty.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Kitchen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Specials.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Won The Cup.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartender Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Plane Blues.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Finest Quality.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Family Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Girls Wanted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skokie Savanna.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Signpost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Man And The Tree.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Street Fleet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Citgo Story.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fantasy Hair Design.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Garage.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Clark Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pole Position.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Geometry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Found Love.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fill In The Blank.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vacuums Of The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dumpster Still Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wagon Master.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Intersecting West Rogers Park.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Antiques.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cow Patrol.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Backstage Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skully Bungalow.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Francisco Frankenstein.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Long Cool Heat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Smokers' Mast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Big Fat Phone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Happy Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alley Men.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Show!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You've Got Mailbox.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Broken Window Theory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dali Logan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Svengoolie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Horner Park Hot Dogs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cubs Rehab.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 20th Century Schizoid Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Men On Vans.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Is Done.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snowy Lincoln.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Waiting Room.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Avondale Chicken.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Winter's End.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Friendly Skies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boyhood Buzzer Beater.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: J Date.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: International Window Lady.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shanghai Inn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Open For Business.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Andersonville Unplugged.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 3-Flat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Turkey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicagolandia.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Eat At Odge's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deitch Pharmacy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sud-Z Bubble.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bands Wanted!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Belmont Tavern.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Superheroic San Luis Freeze.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Oasis.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lyndale Food & Jewelry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Book Window.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alco Dude.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ballin Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Worry, Be Cookie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Four Trey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Office.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America From Inside The Golden Nugget In Ravenswood.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cellphone Repair.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boots 'N' Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunrise Strip.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: At The Corner Of Glad And Happy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Uptown Autumn Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mid-Century Modern Halloween.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Autumn Station Wagon.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Betty's & Nick's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ohio House Impact.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: End School Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Portage Park Peek-A-Boo.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: South Side Sundown.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Susie's Drive-Thru.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Ham.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Food & Liquor, Milhouse.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Hare Blue Line Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Schwing!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ad Deluxe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jesus At The Drive-In.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Tanks Of Avondale.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Conveyance Belt.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Esquire In The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nick's Meat Market.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Keep Havin A Good Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Knock Knock.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Man At Marie's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonneville.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Logan Bags.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Stairwell.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Velvet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Court Is In Session.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: DLER ALKY.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Railyards Rush Hour.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop Killing People.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 1.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Greystone Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You Are Beautiful.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Auto Part Overlords.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bearground.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 2.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skyway Sculpture.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Dome Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hello, St. Joe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Revolution Books.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Driveway.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Proceed To Checkout.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Summer Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Daily Double.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Are Moving.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 3.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunny Day Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ashland & Pawn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Party Store.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Donuts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: AAA Sales.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Rule.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Butcher Boy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Endorsement.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: I Voted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pink(ish) Cadillac.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stuffed With Sadness.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Air.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Economy Heating.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Season's Greetings.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Housemates.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Have Fresh Goat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartcam.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gaslight.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Urban Wheat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Embassy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln's Cozy Corner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Glory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bowling Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Red Lion, Red Hots.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Sitting.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Jukebox Is Not A Democracy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Descending Darkly.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Handicapped Milk Jug Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gumball Express.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicken Run.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wyoming, Michigan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bus Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Manzana.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Look Back.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mail Call.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gas Pump No. 8.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Photo Shoot.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flotos' Gifts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shelf Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: S&M Carpets.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Elvis At The Golden Nugget.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wunder's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Daisies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Supply Line.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sal's Barber Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Classy Oogle Queen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cloudy Gate.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cherry Pie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lannings' Crossing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Devilish Dr. Phil.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:29 AM | Permalink

Why Al-Qaeda Is Still Strong 16 Years After 9/11

Sixteen years ago, on September 11, 2001, al-Qaeda conducted the most destructive terrorist attack in history.

An unprecedented onslaught from the U.S. followed. One-third of al-Qaeda's leadership was killed or captured in the following year.

The group lost its safe haven in Afghanistan, including its extensive training infrastructure there. Its surviving members were on the run or in hiding.

Though it took nearly 10 years, the U.S. succeeded in killing al-Qaeda's founding leader, Osama bin Laden.

Since 2014, al-Qaeda has been overshadowed by its former ally al-Qaeda in Iraq, now calling itself the Islamic State.

In other words, al-Qaeda should not have survived the 16 years since 9/11.

So why has it?

The Ties That Bind

Much of the credit goes to al-Qaeda's extraordinary ability to both form alliances and sustain them over time and under pressure.

In my forthcoming book Alliances for Terror, I examine why a small number of groups, such as al-Qaeda and IS, emerge as desirable partners and succeed at developing alliance networks.

Understanding terrorist alliances is critical because terrorist organizations with allies are more lethal, survive longer and are more apt to seek weapons of mass destruction.

Though terrorist partnerships face numerous hurdles and severing al-Qaeda's alliances has been a U.S. objective for over a decade, the fact is that these counterterrorism efforts have failed.

It was allies that enabled al-Qaeda to survive the immediate aftermath of 9/11.

The Afghan Taliban stood by al-Qaeda after the attack, refusing to surrender bin Laden and thereby precipitating the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan.

Fleeing, al-Qaeda was able to turn to allies in Pakistan to hide its operatives and punish the Pakistani government for capitulating to U.S. pressure to crackdown on the group.

It was alliances that helped al-Qaeda continue to terrorize.

In October 2002, for example, al-Qaeda's ally in Southeast Asia, Jemaah Islamiyah, struck a bar and a nightclub in Bali, killing more than 200 and injuring more than 200 more, to brutally commemorate the first anniversary of 9/11.

And it was alliances that allowed al-Qaeda to project viability. With the "prestige" that came with conducting 9/11, al-Qaeda was able to forge more of them and indeed create affiliate alliances in which partners adopted its name and pledged allegiance to bin Laden.

Al-Qaeda's first and most notorious affiliate alliance, al-Qaeda in Iraq, was formed in 2004 with Jordanian jihadist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.

Using the standing he accrued through his role in the insurgency in Iraq, Zarqawi then helped al-Qaiea acquire its second affiliate in 2006, al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb.

Then, in 2009, al-Qaeda designated its branch in Yemen and Saudi Arabia as al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Its alliances spanned the Middle East and helped it to project power, despite the U.S. war on terrorism.

A Lower Profile

While al-Qaeda still sought affiliates, by 2010, it modified how its alliances worked.

Al-Qaeda forged an alliance with al-Shabaab in Somalia, but did not publicly announce it or ask al-Shabaab to change its name.

Bin Laden justified to al-Shabaab's leader the shift to a less visible form of alliance as a way to prevent an increase in counterterrorism pressure or a loss of funds from the Arabian Peninsula.

He privately expressed concerns that al-Qaeda's name "reduces the feeling of Muslims that we belong to them, and allows the enemies to claim deceptively that they are not at war with Islam."

Bin Laden's deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri, saw the move as bin Laden capitulating to members of al-Qaeda who worried about "inflating the size and the growth of al-Qaeda."

After bin Laden's death, Zawahiri publicly announced al-Qaeda's alliance with al-Shabaab, though al-Shabaab still did not adopt al-Qaeda's name.

Though al-Qaeda's alliance arrangements have varied, these relationships have helped it to survive the loss of its founding leader in 2011 and the ascent of a far less capable leader.

Zawahiri's rise to the helm of the group was the consequence of an alliance, specifically between his original Egyptian group, al-Jihad, and al-Qaeda. The alliance culminated in a merger in 2001, with Zawahiri becoming bin Laden's deputy and successor.

However, Zawahiri lacks bin Laden's cachet or diplomatic savvy. He is a better deputy than a leader.

His poor handling of the strife between jihadist group al-Nusra in Syria and its parent organization, the Islamic State in Iraq (previously al-Qaeda in Iraq and now IS), led to the alliance rupture between al-Qaeda and its affiliate in Iraq.

Though al-Qaeda had an acrimonious break with IS, it gained al-Nusra as an affiliate in the central conflict in the Sunni jihadist movement: Syria.

As was the case with al-Shabaab, this alliance with al-Nusra did not include a rebranding and was initially kept secret.

In addition, al-Nusra subsequently changed its name, an effort to gain more legitimacy within the conflict in Syria by publicly distancing itself from al-Qaeda, though seemingly with al-Qaeda's consent.

Al-Qaeda has not acquired another affiliate since the alliance rupture and rise of IS as a rival in 2014. It organized existing members into a new branch, al-Qaeda in the Indian subcontinent, that year. The branch in South Asia reflected al-Qaeda's success at expanding beyond its predominantly Arab base, particularly Pakistan.

Critically, with the exception of IS, al-Qaeda's alliances have been resilient over time. This is true despite ample reasons for its partners to abandon ties, such as the heightened counterterrorism pressure that comes with affiliation to al-Qaeda; the death of its charismatic leader; and the Islamic State's efforts to court al-Qaeda allies.

Even the Afghan Taliban remains unwilling to sever ties, even though doing so would eliminate one of the major reasons that the United States will not withdraw from the "forever war" in Afghanistan.

There is a window now for the U.S. to damage al-Qaeda's alliances - it has a weak leader and major rival.

But that window may be closing as the Islamic State's so-called caliphate crumbles and al-Qaeda grooms bin Laden's son as its future leader.

Tricia Bacon is an assistant professor of Justice, Law & Criminology at American University. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

-

Comments welcome.

The Conversation

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:24 AM | Permalink

September 21, 2017

The [Thursday] Papers

Pancakes, booze, art.

See you tomorrow! #artlife #chicago #music #booze #pancakes #art

A post shared by Jane Tikkuri (@jane_tikkuri_photography) on

-

New In Today's Beachwood

*

-

BeachBook

While The Rest Of The World Invests More In Education, The U.S. Spends Less.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

One of the authors of the study everybody cites owns a standing desk company!

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Drive thru.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:12 PM | Permalink

Martin Truex Jr. Wins Chicagoland Tales Of The Turtles 400

"From Kyle Busch and Chase Elliott grabbing stage wins to Martin Truex Jr.'s strong run to Victory Lane, a recap from Joliet."


-

See also:

* Tales of the Turtles 400.

* Martin Truex Jr. Continues His Regular-Season Success In The Playoffs.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:11 PM | Permalink

Without A Net: The Digital Divide In America

The United States is likely to reach the goal of making sure every single public school has access to the Internet by 2020, according to EducationSuperHighway, a nonprofit focused on this milestone. But that won't close what has come to be known as "the digital divide."

Nearly one in four school districts still does not have sufficient bandwidth to meet the digital learning needs of students. And even before bandwidth, plenty of schools don't have the laptops or tablets that students need to get online.

Meanwhile, wealthy districts go on purchasing the newest technologies to prepare their students for a world that increasingly runs on them.

The documentary filmmaker Rory Kennedy, who has covered addiction, nuclear radiation and the politics of the Mexican border fence, among other social issues, explores this persistent technology gap in her latest film, Without a Net: The Digital Divide in America.

Rory-Kennedy-480x0-c-default.jpegRory Kennedy

Financed by Verizon, the documentary digs into the funding inequities that contribute to the digital divide as well as efforts, both public and private, to close it.

The film premieres at 9 p.m. Central on Sept. 26 on the National Geographic channel. It will also air on PBS stations around the country this fall.

The Hechinger Report spoke with Kennedy about the film and this issue, crucial to the future of learning.

How long has the "digital divide" been on your radar?

In the last couple years, I've become increasingly aware of it. In making this film I really began to understand the depths of the issue and the fact that there are over a million classrooms in this country that don't have adequate broadband, a huge number of kids who don't have access to computers, and the reality that 77 percent of jobs are going to require technology education and background by the year 2020.

You mention some shocking statistics. What else do you find striking about the digital divide?

The way I like to tell stories is to focus on individuals and, through them, help people understand these numbers and statistics. I would give an example of an individual I met, Amanda, here in New York at the Patrick Henry School. She lived in poverty and went to a school in Harlem and didn't have a lot of access to many resources, and the school had very few computers and internet Wi-Fi, but she was very driven and loved to write and wants to be a lawyer. She would go home at night for her assignments and do them on her mother's cell phone with her thumbs - write an entire paper using her thumbs.

When you watch Amanda do that and she talks about the physical pain, she does it with a smile on her face because she's not prone to complaining, and you think "Oh my God, what are we doing in this country?" We're making it actually physically painful to be educated.

Her story is indicative of so many kids, some of whom are able to educate themselves, but it's so often despite the system and not because of it. I think there's a great opportunity here to really try to even the playing field in terms of education through what technology has to offer. Because, at the end of the day, it doesn't really cost that much and then you can open up worlds to these kids who otherwise have access to very little.

The film spends a lot of time explaining how school funding works, between local, state and federal funds. Are you advocating change there?

Creating awareness is a big part of our goal. So many people I talk to and tell I'm making this film about the digital divide and kids who don't have access to the Internet and computers, they say, "Are you focusing on South America or Africa or where?" I say, "This country." They're shocked. You think everybody here has their own computer and cell phone and they're on it too much, but the reality is there are these huge numbers of kids who don't have access.

Beyond that, I think that the greatest, easiest, quickest solution is for the federal government to decide this is a priority and commit the resources necessary to extend the broadband and ensure that every kid in public schools in this country has their own computer to learn on. Until that happens, we can see how individuals can really make a difference, and institutions and corporations.

Do you think it will be difficult to engage people with this issue?

It's hard to get anybody to focus on anything at this point in the game. There's a lot of chatter and a lot of competing media out there. But I do think it's an important issue. It's an issue that impacts not only the kids who don't have access, but it speaks to larger issues of us as a country, and do we want to be ahead of the game in terms of technology, and do we want to be able to compete over the next 10, 20, 50 years on the international scale?

Right now we have four million STEM jobs in this country that are unfilled because we don't have a system where we're educating people to do those jobs.

I think that if we want to stay competitive, if we want to employ our citizens, if we want to keep them engaged, that it's an issue that really impacts all of us in a significant way. My hope is that people will be drawn to it and kind of understand that bigger story.

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, the nonprofit, independent news website focused on inequality and innovation in education. It has been edited for length and clarity. Sign up for our newsletter.

-

The trailer.

-

Comments welcome.

-

1. From Steve Rhodes:

I have to admit I'm uncomfortable with Verizon funding this - even though I'm sympathetic to the cause. In fact, the headline I originally wrote said, "Verizon Funds NatGeo Documentary." But that headline didn't reflect the content, so I dropped it. And I understand that it's not necessarily a bad thing to get money from Verizon to fund something like this even if Verizon has its own agenda. At the same time, though, isn't it a problem when Verizon puts its thumb on the scale even for causes we like? Shouldn't they stay out of the content business?

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:19 AM | Permalink

September 20, 2017

The [Wednesday] Papers

Forgive yourself. And drink local.

forgivedrink.jpg

-

In Today's Beachwood

Rhymefest vs. Obama.

*

The Weekend In Chicago Rock (including Riot Fest highlights).

And, catching up with Last Week In Chicago Rock . . .

*

The Beachwood vs. Ken Burns' Vietnam.

*

100-Year-Old Petrified Uniformities Of The Modern Art World vs. The Moral Grandeur Of Majestic Impressionism.

*

How Comics Captured Vietnam.

*

Football Killed Zac Easter.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Amazonian.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:41 PM | Permalink

100-Year-Old Petrified Uniformities Of The Modern Art World vs. The Moral Grandeur Of Majestic Impressionism

The biggest art movement in history is going on now in Chicago, across the nation, and throughout Europe. But their paintings were not found at last weekend's Art Expo, nor in the Modern Wing of the Art Institute, nor at the Contemporary Museum of Art.

They are artists who paint en plein air (in open air) as did the French Impressionists, who found that they could capture the transient effects of sunlight, and who painted so magnificently that they remain one of the most glorious and beloved of all the artists' movements throughout history (as well as by far the most expensive). The goal is not to have the work look like these masters, but to see like these masters - in individual independent styles.

The art world's clash today is "shock and schlock" vs majestic realism. "Beauty in art is dead" has been the mainstay the majority of the 20th century and into the 21st. This is evident in the majority of museums and galleries and art expos across the nation. Shock speaks of the outrageous - the bizarre potential of human imagination. Shock concepts vs. veracity and quality; conceptual spectacle, de-skilling and verbosity vs. the grand manor, idealized aesthetics, and great art as the highest proof of human intelligence and sincerity. Shock value only lasts so long. After all, it isn't shocking the second time.

The Art Institute takes great pride in its collection of French Impressionist paintings, as it is among the finest outside of France. But have you seen any impressionistic paintings beyond many decades old at the museum?

The French Impressionists said many things about how to paint, as if they felt their discoveries were for posterity. Have we insulted the Impressionists by not considering impressionism a valid art form if done in these modern times?

In the new Modern Wing of the Art Institute, there is some realism, but not without a tinge of the bizarre. The art departments of our great universities scoffed at realism during the latter half of the 20th century and wouldn't teach it.

Petrified uniformities of our era render us untrue even to ourselves. As great artists always infringe with liberty, perhaps now is the time, in the revelation of conscience, to question our belief systems and put to rest old world ideas; realize that art is more than just a "forging ahead" of genres, a revelation that all genres are "in." Art moreover is taste. Quality should be always in style. Quality rather than genre. Shouldn't it come down to quality vs. not quality? And isn't that attitude Post-Modern?

Expressive realism, on the other hand, is about dedicated individuals developing time-honored and difficult skills. Expressive realism challenges the very core of human sensitivity and capability. It is the long toil, and to render the hand obedient. "There is nothing more difficult or demanding than painting. It calls for a state of physical and mental alertness sustained throughout the session." (John Howard Sanden)

The processes and techniques give unprecedented joys of accomplishment and personal satisfaction. Realism is not so much concerned with fashion. The results are fine-tuned individuality and style.

Art is majestic and soul-moving, and a reason to live. It is the aesthetics of realistic (representational) paintings that so many love and call their favorites and draw the biggest lines to the Art Institute. The plein air painters' movement is freed from the tyranny of pedagogy and fashion. Liberated. Because we were all born free, and born liberated.

You may have spotted Chicago's plein air painters around town, standing in a warm field, painting Chicago's gracious gardens of sun-kissing roses, or painting the iron bridges, the exploding Chicago River, or the gilded pillars of Chicago's world-class architecture.

They meet up every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. at a designated location downtown or in city neighborhoods, and paint for three hours.

gatheringplein.pngA demonstration in Lincoln Park.

This is usually followed by a critique from a renowned Chicago artist whose hands paint with all the confident draftsmanship of the most disciplined masters - like Errol Jacobson, Steve Puttrich or Nancie King Mertz. These are not teachers; they are awakeners.

Come see their work at the Plein Air Exhibit through September 24th at the Palette & Chisel Academy of Fine Arts, at 1012 North Dearborn. (312 642-4400)

Traditional impressionism, when excellent, is widely admired and collected in a frenzy of mad intoxication. Since most plein air paintings are done quickly, as they are about grasping the essence of the moment, and the play of light, these paintings are less expensive than long-labored paintings. Prices generally range from $100 to $1,200. It's never too late to be the collector you always wanted to be.

Behold, the door of your soul. Come join the Plein Air Painters of Chicago on Facebook and at PapChicago.com.

"The first quality that is needed is audacity," Winston Churchill said of painting!

Who knows who may become the glory of this city! The sky has many stars. Come paint with us in a field of warm hospitality. We'll talk then, as we pack up our supplies and salute the sun.

"I have walked this earth for 30 years, and, out of gratitude, want to leave some souvenir." (Vincent van Gogh)

*

Webster Street Bridge/Errol Jacobson.

pleinbridge.png

*

Early Commute/Nancie King Mertz.

commuteplein.png

*

Bucktown Cafe/Maureen Sharkey.

bucktowncafeplein.png

*

Blue Heron in Lincoln Park/Maureen Sharkey.

heronplein.png

*

Rocky Forest/Steve Puttrich.

forestplein.png

*

Richard Schmid/Winter Home.

homeplein.png

*

Tree/Richard Schmid.

treeplein.png

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:41 AM | Permalink

Comics Captured America's Growing Ambivalence About The Vietnam War

In America's imagination, the Vietnam War is not so much celebrated as it is assiduously contemplated. This inward-looking approach is reflected in films like The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse Now, best-selling novels and popular memoirs that dwell on the psychological impact of the war.

Was the war worth the cost, human and otherwise? Was it a winnable war or doomed from the outset? What are its lessons and legacies?

These questions also underpin Ken Burns' Vietnam War documentary, which premiered Sunday. But many forget that before the Vietnam War ended as a Cold War quagmire, it began as a clear-eyed anti-communist endeavor.

As a child, I was always fascinated by comics; now, as a cultural studies scholar, I've been able to fuse this passion with an interest in war narratives.

Comics - more than any medium - reflect the narrative trajectory of the war, and how the American public evolved from being generally supportive of the war to ambivalent about its purpose and prospects.

marvelnam.jpgA panel from the Marvel Comics series The 'Nam/Marvel Comics

The Voice Of The People

Histories of war are often told through the major battles and the views of the generals and politicians in power.

American comics, on the other hand, tend to reflect the popular attitudes of the era in which they are produced. Due to serialization and mass production, they're uniquely equipped to respond to changing dynamics and shifting politics.

During the Great Depression, Superman battled corrupt landlords. At the height of World War II, Captain America clashed with the fascist Red Skull. Tony Stark's transformation into Iron Man occurred alongside the growth of the military industrial complex during the Cold War. And the diverse team of X-Men first appeared during the civil rights movement. These storylines reflect the shifting attitudes of regular people, the target audience of these comics.

More recent plots have included Tea Party rallies, failed peace missions in Iran and coming-out stories - all of which underscore the fact that comics continue to engage with current affairs and politics.

As modes of "modern memory," comics - to quote French historian Pierre Nora - "confront us with the brutal realization of the difference of real memory . . . and history, which is how our hopelessly forgetful modern societies, propelled by change, organize the past."

In other words, comics are a type of historical record; they're a window into what people were thinking and how they were interpreting events - almost in real time.

From Hawks To Doves

The comics produced in the years during, after and leading up to the Vietnam War were no different.

The conflict, its soldiers and its returning veterans appear in mainstream comics franchises such as The Amazing Spider Man, Iron Man, Punisher, Thor, The X-Men and Daredevil. But the portrayal of soldiers - and the war - shifted considerably over the course of the conflict.

Prior to 1968 and the Tet Offensive, Marvel comics tended to feature pro-war plots that involved superhero battles involving U.S. compatriots and the South Vietnamese National Liberation Front battling Ho Chi Minh's communist forces. These Manichean plots were reminiscent of World War II comics, wherein the "good guys" were clearly distinguished from their evil counterparts.

But as the anti-war protest movement started to gain momentum - and as public opinion about the conflict turned - the focus of such works shifted from heroic campaigns to traumatic aftermaths. More often than not, these included storylines about returning Vietnam War veterans, who struggled to return to civilian life, who were haunted by the horrors of conflict and who often lamented those "left behind" (namely their South Vietnamese allies).

Such transformations - superhero hawks becoming everyday doves - actually foreshadowed a common trauma trope in the Hollywood films that would be made about the war.

No 'Supermen' in The 'Nam

Marvel Comics' The 'Nam (1986-1993), written and edited by Vietnam War veterans Doug Murray and Larry Hama, reflects the medium's ability to narrate the past while addressing the politics of the present. The plots, for example, balanced the early jingoism with a now familiar, post-conflict cynicism.

Each issue was chronological - spanning 1966 to 1972 - and told from the point of view of a soldier named Ed Marks.

As Hama wrote in the introduction to Volume One, "Every time a month went by in the real world, a month went by in the comic . . . It had to be about the guys on the ground who got jungle rot, malaria, and dysentery. It had to be about people, not ideas, and the people had to be real, not cardboard heroes or super-men."

The 'Nam's 84 issues placed historical events such as the Tet Offensive alongside personal stories involving "search and destroy" campaigns, conflicts with commanding officers, and love affairs.

The 'Nam's initial success was critical and commercial: the inaugural December 1986 issue outsold a concurrent installment of the widely popular X-Men series.

While Jan Scruggs, president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial fund, questioned whether the war should be the subject of a comic book, Newsweek editor William Broyles praised the series, noting its "gritty reality."

The most telling praise came from Bravo Organization, a notable Vietnam veterans' group. The 'Nam was recognized by the organization as the "best media portrayal of the Vietnam War," beating out Oliver Stone's Platoon.

As works of art, the Vietnam War comics are only one of many places the Vietnam War has been restaged, remembered and recollected. One of the war's enduring legacies is the way it has inspired its veterans, its victims and its historians to try to piece together a portrait of what actually happened - an ongoing process that continues with Burns' documentary. There has been no universal consensus, no final word.

As Pulitizer Prize-winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen wrote, "All wars are fought twice. The first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory."

Cathy Schlund-Vials is a professor of English and Asian-American Studies at the University of Connecticut. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

-

See also: The Beachwood vs. Ken Burns' Vietnam.

-

Comments welcome.

The Conversation

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:13 AM | Permalink

The CTE Diaries: The Life And Death Of A High School Football Player Killed By Concussions

"Football killed Zac Easter. But before it did, before the head trauma inflicted by concussions became too much to bear, he recorded it all in his diary, hoping that his story might ensure that what happened to him wouldn't happen to others."


-

Previously in concussions:
* Bob Probert's Broken Brain.

* NFL Players Killing Themselves Because They Miss Football So Much.

* The College Football Report: Dementia Pugilistica.

* Blackhawks Playing Head Games.

* Jay Cutler Should Consider Retiring.

* Dislike: Friday Night Tykes.

* Hurt And Be Hurt: The Lessons Of Youth Sports.

* Chicago Soccer Player Patrick Grange Had CTE.

* Sony Softened Concussion To Placate NFL.

* Ultra-Realistic Madden To Simulate Game's Debilitating Concussions.

* Dear Football: I'm Breaking Up With You.

* Dead College Football Player's Brain Leaves Clues Of Concussions' Toll On Brain.

* More Bad Concussion News For Young Football Players.

* NFL Tried To Fix Concussion Study.

* The Week In Concussions: Another Enforcer Down.

* Teen Concussion Rate Rising Significantly.

* Conflict Of Interest For NFL Doctors To Report To Teams: Harvard Study.

* U.S. Supreme Court Ends Fight Over $1 Billion NFL Concussion Deal.

* U.S. High School Soccer Concussions On The Rise.

* Youth Football Finally Listening To Coach Coffman.

* Many Kids Still Don't Report Concussion Symptoms. How Can We Change That?

* Brain Damage In Former Players Fuels Soccer 'Heading' Fears.

* Canadian Youth Hockey Injuries Cut In Half After National Policy Change.

* More Teen Knowledge About Concussion May Not Increase Reporting.

* High School Boys Fear Looking 'Weak' If They Report Concussions.

* Pro Flag Football Is Now A Thing - Starring Former NFL Players!

* Nearly All Donated NFL Brains Found To Have CTE.

* Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions.

* Whoa. Perhaps The Smartest Player In NFL History - He's In Math PhD Program At MIT - Assesses Situation And Decides To Save His Brain.

* Study: CTE Affects Football Players At All Levels.

* Dan Jiggetts Is Right About CTE.

* Letting Our Boys Onto The Football Field Is A Losing Play.

* Tackle Rings?

* CTE Season Preview.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:35 AM | Permalink

The Beachwood vs. Ken Burns' Vietnam

An e-mail exchange between our very own Tim Willette and Steve Rhodes.

Tim: I read that Dan Ellsberg is not in the Burns documentary.

If that's true . . . A 10-episode, 18-hour documentary about the war and Ellsberg isn't in it? Maybe LBJ isn't in it, either!

Steve: But John McCain's in it!

Tim: They're interviewing McNamara's hair now.

Steve: I wondered if they interviewed Bush, Cheney, Trump . . .

Tim: Holy shit! They're interviewing Rob Rheault (Coppola based the Kurtz character on him - so far they haven't brought this up). Wow.

Steve: Wow! I wonder if they'll interview Ron Kovics. Also, Peggy Noonan and Bill Kristol . . .

Tim: I expect Mark Halperin any time now. Also Shelby Foote to tell us the villagers loved the strategic hamlet program, and Wynton Marsalis to explain why all Vietnamese jazz after 1965 sucked. And of course George Will to point out the introduction of the DH ('73) led to the fall of Saigon.

-

Comments welcome.

-

1. From David Rutter:

One can watch Ken Burns' work on several levels. He's admirable as a basic storyteller technician but, in his typical quest to show "many truths," he eventually obscures the one necessary truth that withstands reinvention.

In the Civil War series (which I generally admire for technique) he lost track of the essential cause of the war and thereby obscured that slavery was the principle sustaining motive for the South's "lost cause." Slavery always looks more appealing when it's portrayed in sepia tones with aching violin solos as background. But it was a cruel, despicable motive for war.

In the Vietnam opus, he almost misplaces the essential that the war was never that nation's Civil War. It was an American extension of the colonial universe that France employed to bleed the country and which then the U.S. adopted.

South Vietnam was never a self-generated free state filled with "freedom fighters." It was created and sustained by U.S. intelligence operators.

I am not the first or most insightful (see Jeff Stein in Newsweek) to suggest the erroneous narrative of "Freedom Fighters against the Communist Horde" was conveniently adopted by American correspondents and sold to America as the reason we had to be there.

But that energizing narrative was never true. And before we are allowed to cleanse ourselves of what the Vietnam War did to us, we should at least see our sin clearly for the self-indulgent solipsism it was.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:18 AM | Permalink

Rhymefest Leads Obama Library CBA Effort

Hundreds of community residents will gather at Hyde Park Academy High School, 6220 S. Stony Island, at 6 p.m. today for a meeting announcing a renewed push for a Community Benefits Agreement with the Obama Library that includes the City, the University of Chicago, and the Obama Foundation.

The Obama Library Community Benefit Agreement Coalition will announce a new push for a City Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance which would ensure benefits around jobs, housing, sustainability, transportation and education.

Che "Rhymefest" Smith, hip-artist and community activist, will keynote the event in support of a Community Benefits Agreement. The Coalition will also announce new ally organizations, which now number over a dozen.

This meeting comes after Obama asserted last week that his global not-for-profit will not enter into a legally binding agreement with communities impacted by his presidential library.

He spoke on Thursday via teleconference at a public forum on the development. The Coalition camped overnight outside of the meeting's venue to ensure that they'd be able to have their questions answered directly by the Foundation's leaders.

"On behalf of the thousands of Chicago residents who have been mired by lack of employment, contracts, and access to capital, we will continue to urge the City of Chicago, the University of Chicago, the Obama Foundation, and other partners in this development to sign a much-needed Community Benefits Agreement," said Anton Seals Jr., of the Bronzeville Regional Collective.

"We are pushing for a City Community Benefit Agreement Ordinance because that can provide homeowners and low-income renters protection from displacement by surges in housing prices and rental stock - protection that the Foundation cannot provide without city policy.

"Already this year, Woodlawn has seen the third-highest relative increase in home values in the country, threatening increased rents and property taxes."

The Obama Library CBA Coalition says in a statement: "We are calling not only for transparency and accountability on how public dollars will be used as the Obama Presidential Center is realized. We are calling for something stronger than a handshake agreement that everyday citizens will not be harmed by land-grabs and the new revitalization efforts coming to Bronzeville, Jackson Park, South Shore, Woodlawn, and other predominantly African-American communities nearby to the west.

"As lifelong Chicagoans, we are not new to the political games. People should not have to sacrifice their homes for the Obama library. This public/private project, like others headed our way, has the potential to put people to work, stimulate local economies, strengthen neighboring public schools, and create economic engines for small businesses, and more growth and opportunity - if it is legally accountable to the community it seeks to benefit.

"We are proud the Obama Foundation chose Jackson Park. We now call on the former president to make history again: With the City and others, sign a Community Benefits Agreement and demonstrate that the words you've spoken about inclusion, transparency, and global problem-solving have meaning."

*

ObamaCBA.org, @ObamaCBA

This event is being organized by the Obama-Library CBA Coalition, led by the Bronzeville Regional Collective (BRC), Kenwood Oakland Community Org. (KOCO), Prayer and Action Collective (PAC), Southside Together Organizing Power (STOP) - with support from Chicago Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights.

Allied with Alliance of the Southeast (ASE), Brighton Park Neighborhood Council (BPNC), Chicago Jobs Council (CJC), the Chicago Rehab Network, Chicago Women in Trades (CWIT), Metropolitan Tenants Organization (MTO), Showing up for Racial Justice (SURJ), Wolfpack, Woodlawn East Community And Neighbors (WECAN).

-

See also: Obama's Rejection Of Community Benefits Deal Still A Win, Activists Say.

-

Previously: Why No Community Benefits Agreement For The Obama Library?

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:54 AM | Permalink

September 19, 2017

The [Tuesday] Papers

You matter always. Overthrow the status.

New stuff this week! #quimbys #quimbysbookstorechicago #zines

A post shared by Quimbys Bookstore (@quimbysbookstore) on

-

Sean Spicer At The Emmys
Hey, war criminals George W. Bush, Barack Obama and their cronies were on Ellen, so . . .

-

Don't Ever Conflate Disaster Recovery With Education Reform
Paging the Tribune's editor-in-chief.

-

A Bloody Decade Of The iPhone
The long and complicated supply chain has caused innumerable work injuries, occupational diseases and premature deaths over the past decade.

-

FCC Asks Sinclair Some Questions
"The Applicants do not indicate what steps, if any, they have already taken or what specific steps they plan to take Post-Transaction to comply with the national ownership limit."

-

Who Is Stealing Wisconsin's Birch?
A prolific poacher can make hundreds of dollars per day with no investment other than a pickup truck and hand saw.

-

BeachBook

Equifax Impressed By Hackers' Ability To Ruin People's Finances More Efficiently Than Company Can.

*

The Heidelberg Project Is Coming Down.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Rage against the dying light.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:03 AM | Permalink

The Weekend In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Chon at Riot Fest on Friday.


-

2. Bushoong at Jacqueline's on Friday night.

-

3. Jawbreaker at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

4. Hot Water Music at Cobra Lounge for a Riot Fest aftershow on Sunday night.

-

5. The Queers at Cobra Lounge for a Riot Fest preshow on Thursday night.

-

6. The Buzzcocks at Riot Fest on Friday.

And . . .

The Buzzcocks at Cobra Lounge for a Riot Fest aftershow on Saturday night.

-

7. Eddie Vedder outside Wrigley Field with Manuel Miller and Jack James Mckee on Friday.

-

8. Cap'n Jazz at Riot Fest on Sunday.

-

9. Jaik Willis at Reggies on Sunday night.

-

10. That 1 Guy at Reggies on Sunday night.

-

11. The Mighty Mighty Bosstones at Riot Fest on Sunday.

-

12. Peaches at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

13. Paramore at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

14. The Lawrence Arms at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

15. Nine Inch Nails at Riot Fest on Friday night.

-

16. Mike D at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

17. Queens of the Stone Age at Riot Fest on Saturday night.

-

18. X at Riot Fest on Friday.

-

19. Fishbone at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

20. Fidlar at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

21. At The Drive-In at Riot Fest on Saturday night.

-

22. Death From Above at Riot Fest on Friday.

-

23. Danzig at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

24. Built To Spill at Riot Fest on Sunday.

-

25. Wu Tang Clan at Riot Fest on Saturday night.

-

26. GWAR at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

27. Dead Cross at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

28. New Order at Riot Fest on Friday night.

-

29. Ministry at Riot Fest on Friday.

-

30. Daikaiju at Liar's Club for a Riot Fest aftershow on Sunday night.

-

31. Slaves at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

32. Bad Brains at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

33. Pennywise at Riot Fest on Sunday.

-

34. GBH at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

35. Taking Back Sunday at Riot Fest on Saturday night.

-

36. Golgol Bordello at the Concord on Sunday night.

-

37. Madeline Kenney at Schuba's on Sunday night.

-

38. Shaina Hoffman at Cafe Mustache on Friday night.

-

39. M.I.A. at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

40. Vic Mensa at Riot Fest on Friday night.

-

41. Dessa at Riot Fest on Sunday.

-

42. The Regrettes at Riot Fest on Saturday.

-

43. Prophets of Rage at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

44. Dinosaur Jr. at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

45. Best Coast at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

46. Minus the Bear at Riot Fest on Sunday.

-

47. TV On The Radio at Riot Fest on Sunday night.

-

48. The Story So Far at Riot Fest on Friday.

-

49. Wishbone Ash at the Arcada in St. Charles on Friday night.

-

50. Anton Hatwich at Cafe Mustache on Friday night.

-

51. The Smithereens at the Arcada in St. Charles on Saturday night.

-

52. Ed Sheeran in Rosemont on Friday night.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:44 AM | Permalink

A Bloody Decade Of The iPhone

Ten years ago the first iPhone went on sale. The iconic product not only profoundly altered the world of gadgets, but also of consumption and tall corporate profit; this world would be impossible without the toiling of millions along the assembly line.

I look back at the first 10 years of the iPhone and see a bloody decade of labor abuse, especially in Chinese factories such as those run by Foxconn, the world's largest electronics manufacturer. At one point Foxconn had more employees in China than the U.S. armed forces combined.

Foxconn makes most of its money from assembling iPhones, iPads, iMacs and iPods. It's notorious "military management" was blamed for causing a string of 17 worker suicides in 2010.

The company tried hard to stop the suicides - not by digging out the roots of exploitation, but by erecting "anti-jumping nets" atop its buildings. Never before has a modern factory hidden behind such suicide-prevention netting, which last appeared on transatlantic slave ships centuries ago.

Foxconn is only one part of the Apple empire. The long and complicated supply chain has caused innumerable work injuries, occupational diseases and premature deaths over the past decade.

To date, Apple does not offer a full account for the total damage of victimized lives. The number must be many, many thousands if we include all Apple suppliers. And yet factories like Foxconn often enjoy immunity, sometimes taking no responsibility at all.

-

To Make A Living, Workers Must Break The Law

Apple continues to put out bogus claims. The company claims to hold its suppliers accountable "to the highest standards."

In reality, corporate practices in the making of the iPhone are substandard when held up against either Chinese labor regulations or ethical smartphone companies such as Fairphone. Apple's standards for their workers are anything but "the highest."

Wages remain low. Students and Scholars Against Corporate Misbehavior calculate that the living wage for an iPhone worker in Shenzhen, China, should be about $650 per month. But to earn this amount today, an average worker would need to pull off 80-90 hours of overtime every month - more than double the legal cap of 36 hours.

In other words, to make a living, workers have no choice but to break Chinese law.

Back in 2012, Apple vowed to work with Foxconn to bring the amount of overtime down to no more than 49 hours a week. It later broke its promise and retreated to adopt the Electronic Industry Code of Conduct, which stipulates "no more than 60 hours a week."

The EICC standard is 25% lower than the Chinese legal threshold. So why did Apple opt for a less-than-legal code of conduct in the Chinese context over a higher standard? Tim Cook owes us an explanation.

Even with the EICC, workers refusing to do excessive overtime at the current wage level simply won't be able to make ends meet. The only way for workers to earn a livelihood without doing an illegal amount of overtime, and without compromising their physical, mental and social health, is for Apple and their suppliers to raise basic wages.

Is There Real Progress Behind The Progress Reports?

Apple also brags about its training programs. According to its 2017 Supplier Responsibility Progress Report, the company partnered with its suppliers to train more than 2.4 million workers on their rights as employees. One basic right is for workers to unionize.

However, those at Foxconn are stuck with a management-run fake union that is ineffective and fooling no one.

If Apple is serious about its words, it should let workers know about their rights to genuine union representation and use its influence to let workers exercise this right. Unfortunately, no such thing has occurred in the past 10 years. Will it happen in the next 10?

Considering that Apple has recently backed out from the Fair Labor Association, a third-party auditor of corporate social responsibility, I'm skeptical. The FLA is not exactly "the highest standard" in labor-related auditing to begin with. But Apple no longer even bothers to ask it to assess supplier working conditions.

Despite this regressive move, Apple declared in its annual supplier responsibility report that it "continue(s) to partner with independent third-party auditors."

The glossy report offers no information on who the auditors actually are, and how their independence is guaranteed. This is fairly inconsistent with Apple's claim to be the most transparent of IT companies.

What then, are "the highest standards?" The least Apple can do is to let international trade union federations audit Foxconn and other suppliers to ensure their workers are not mistreated. If Apple and Foxconn are so proud of what they have done for workers, why would they be afraid?

Apple should also stop pretending it doesn't know about Fairphone, the Lovie Award-winning Dutch smartphone firm that was "Europe's "fastest-growing tech startup" in 2015.

With its modular design, information transparency and worker welfare fund, Fairphone has brought revolutionary change to the ethical design, manufacture and recycling of smartphones, setting a truly new standard for the likes of Apple.

Last August, I visited Hi-P, a factory in Suzhou, China, that assembles Fairphones. Hi-P also happens to be a supplier for Apple. According to a worker I spoke to, she and her colleagues preferred to make Fairphones because the job was less demanding and more generously remunerated.

"It's much harder working for Apple. They are so stingy," the assembly-line worker in her late 30s told me. "Our managers asked them [Apple] to give us similar bonuses [as we received from Fairphone]. They tried again and again, but ended up getting nothing even close."

If an ordinary worker can plainly demonstrate that Apple does not, in fact, have the "highest standards," surely it's time the company stopped pleading ignorance or innocence of its labor abuse.

There's no excuse for Apple's first bloody decade of the iPhone. And even less so for its next decade.

Jack Linchuan Qiu is a journalism professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His book, Goodbye iSlave: A Manifesto for Digital Abolition, is available from the University of Illinois Press.

This article is part of the Democracy Futures series, a joint global initiative with the Sydney Democracy Network. The project aims to stimulate fresh thinking about the many challenges facing democracies in the 21st century.

-

See also:

* Wisconsin Assembly Sends $3 billion Foxconn Incentive Package To Governor.

* Foxconn To Get $230,000 In Incentives For Every Wisconsin Job Created.

* Foxconn Has A Long History Of Lying About Its Plans To Open Plants And Create Jobs.

* Tribune Editorial Page Hard-On For Foxconn.

-

Comments welcome.

The Conversation

-

1. From Steve Rhodes;

Putting the con in Foxconn.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 2:02 AM | Permalink

If George W. Bush Can Be On Ellen, Of Course Sean Spicer Will Be At The Emmys

Though some jaws dropped, many laughed, and the former White House press secretary was applauded for having a "sense of humor" about the work he did for President Donald Trump, there should be nothing surprising about Sean Spicer's on-stage appearance at Sunday night's Emmy Awards.

And so while some jeered the Emmy's producers for trying to make a cheap joke or "normalize" Spicer, it was clear that many didn't find the gag particularly funny.

But taking the criticism a step further, journalist Glenn Greenwald makes the point, in a post at The Intercept on Monday morning, that there is nothing shocking - and much that's very predictable - about a man like Spicer being welcomed into the circles of the elite.

sean-spicer-emmys.jpg

Noting the mix of "shock and indignation" his appearance generated, Greenwald argues there "should be nothing whatsoever surprising about any of this, as it is the logical and necessary outcome of the self-serving template of immunity which DC elites have erected for themselves."

He continues:

The Bush administration was filled with high-level officials who did not just lie from podiums but did so in service of actual war crimes. They invaded and destroyed a country of 26 million people based on blatant falsehoods and relentless propaganda. They instituted a worldwide torture regime by issuing decrees that purported to re-define what that term meant. They spied on the communications of American citizens without the warrants required by law. They kidnapped innocent people from foreign soil and sent them to be tortured in the dungeons of the world's worst regimes, and rounded up Muslims on domestic soil with no charges. They imprisoned Muslim journalists for years without a whiff of due process. And they generally embraced and implemented the fundamental tenets of authoritarianism by explicitly positioning the President and his White House as above the law.

We're supposed to all forget about that, or at least agree to minimize it, in service of this revisionist conceit that the United States has long been governed by noble, honorable and decent people until Donald Trump defaced the sanctity of the Oval Office with his band of gauche miscreants and evil clowns. Many of the same people who, just a decade ago, were depicting Dick Cheney, Karl Rove and Paul Wolfowitz - remember them? - as monsters of historic proportions are today propagating the mythology that Trump is desecrating what had always been sacred and benevolent American civic space.

Not only were all Bush officials fully immunized from the legal consequences of their crimes - in D.C,, that's a given - but they were also fully welcomed back into decent elite society with breakneck speed, lavished with honors, rewards, lucrative jobs and praise. Those same Bush officials responsible for the most horrific crimes are now beloved by many of the same circles which, today, are expressing such righteous rage that Sean Spicer is allowed onto the Emmy stage and a classroom at Harvard.

And Christian Christensen, a journalism professor at Stockholm University and a frequent Common Dreams contributor, put it this way:

And so while George W. Bush, as Greenwald noted in his column, has appeared with smiles on Ellen DeGeneres's daytime show and high-level people who served under him, including press secretary Ari Fleischer and speechwriter David Frum, are now embraced by mainstream news outlets and polite members of "liberal" society, there's little that should be shocking when Spicer drives onto the Emmy's stage in a motorized podium.

bush_ellen.jpg

"If you're someone who employs David Frum or hires Ari Fleischer or treats Bush-era war criminals as respectable and honored sources," concludes Greenwald, "you really have no standing to object to the paradigm that has ushered Spicer into the halls of elite power. This is the precedent of elite immunity that has been created, often by the same people who are now so upset that Sean Spicer and his fellow Trump functionaries are the beneficiaries of the framework they helped to install."

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

-

Comments welcome.

-

1. From Steve Rhodes:

I would just add that many Obama officials - and Obama himself - also participated in the kind of war crimes and gross malfeasance attributed seemingly singularly to Bush and his cronies. In fact, Obama chose not to prosecute those responsible for the CIA's worldwide torture regime, and expanded the NSA's spying operations while prosecuting journalists and whistleblowers at a record rate, lest we forget.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:46 AM | Permalink

Who Is Stealing Wisconsin's Birch?

In the autumn of 2016, forestry and law enforcement officials in northwestern Wisconsin started receiving reports of paper birch trees being stolen from public and private lands. The tree's white, papery bark is popular for "Northwoods"-style decorations and crafts, driving demand for raw material.

Theft of smaller paper birch trees, saplings and limbs are common, with buyers paying $1.50 to $2 per pole. Wardens from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources estimate that a prolific poacher can make hundreds of dollars per day with no investment other than a pickup truck and hand saw. Private, tribal, county, state and national forests in northern Wisconsin, Minnesota and Upper Michigan are all facing this birch theft.

forests-paperbirch-poaching-management-industry.jpgCalsidyrose/CC BY 2.0)

In response, representatives from tribal, county and state government departments, along with the Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission, law enforcement agencies, and timber wholesalers and buyers established a committee to address this birch theft. Additionally recent media attention is prompting calls to law enforcement as people recognize and report this illegal activity - some offenders are being prosecuted for timber theft.

A tribal treaty right to gather material on public lands in ceded territory complicates the issue of paper birch theft. Illegal harvesting is generally conducted by non-tribal members, but treaty rights present a complex enforcement issue.

Tribal members can harvest up to 75 lodgepoles per day on some public forest lands with the appropriate permit, but the potential impact of overharvest on the regeneration and growth of birch is a concern. On tribal lands, members are expressing concerns for the resource after seeing truckloads of birch leaving reservations. The Bad River and Lac Courte Oreilles reservations have birch harvesting moratoriums in place to reduce commercial harvests, impacting the treaty rights of those gathering these trees for personal or cultural use.

In the larger picture of Wisconsin's forest products industry, the volume of birch theft is very small. However, illegal cutting steals future revenue from forestland owners, and destroys trees that will never be legally cut and sold. Additionally, these thefts reduce the future birch supply available for harvest and sale into the traditional forest products industry for uses like pulpwood for paper production.

A Declining Resource

Wisconsin's 16.5 million acres of timberland supports a total growing stock of 21.9 billion cubic feet for all tree species. The growing stock of paper birch (Betula papyrifera) makes up a small portion of this volume, consisting of 481 million cubic feet, or about 2 percent of total growing stock. While paper birch's annual removal in the form of legal harvest is 13.1 million cubic feet, the species has a negative net annual growth rate of -4.3 percent in Wisconsin. This means the state is losing this forest type as other tree species take their place through natural succession.

This negative growth rate is happening for several reasons. Paper birch is an early successional species; it needs full sun exposure and disturbance to thrive. Larger clear cuts in past years provided each, but this harvest method has declined over time, with a consequence of decreasing birch regeneration. Other reasons for the tree's declining numbers include high mortality caused in drought years, and from insect and disease pressure.

It is important for consumers to ask questions when making home decor purchases. Where did the birch come from? Was it legally harvested? In traditional wood markets, timber theft has been an issue for export lumber for many years. Consumers in the United States and Europe had concerns about illegally harvested timber and ceased purchasing lumber from certain African countries where illegal logging is rampant.

Both the U.S. and the European Union have laws that prevent the import of illegally harvested timber products. In the U.S., the ongoing Seneca Creek Study has shown due diligence can demonstrate the legality of harvested timber, a requirement for exporters hoping to sell American lumber into the EU. In the rare cases that theft does happen, legal systems are in place to deal with the issue.

Birch theft is the unfortunate result of consumer demand, unscrupulous harvesters and unscrupulous buyers. Local awareness and media attention will help restrict this activity, and efforts by the working committee in northern Wisconsin may provide other solutions. Paper birch is an important forest component that should be managed for future generations.

Scott Bowe is a wood products specialist at the University of Wisconsin-Extension, and a professor in the UW-Madison Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology. This article was originally published on WisContext which produced the article in a partnership between Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Public Television and Cooperative Extension.

-

Previously in Wisconsin:

* Wisconsin Cheese Production Continues To Grow.

* Wisconsin's Specialty Cheesemakers May Be Better Off Than Other States.

* Tips For Growing Blueberries In Wisconsin.

* Amid A Boom, Wisconsin Cranberry Growers Look To Future Markets.

* The Top 10 Wisconsin Insect Trends Of 2016.

* Wisconsin's Penokees Are A Geologic Gem.

* Wisconsin Researchers Aim To Make Cows Happier.

* Wisconsin And The Extinction Of The Passenger Pigeon.

* The Life Of Land After Frac Sand.

* Blueberry Maggot Fly Poised To Expand In Wisconsin.

* Efforts To Boost Marten Numbers In Wisconsin Meet Ongoing Failure.

* How To Raise A Pizza.

* RECALL! Wisconsin Pork Sausage Patties.

* Making The Most Of Wisconsin's Autumn Garden Harvest.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:34 AM | Permalink

Don't Ever Conflate Disaster Recovery With Education Reform

Storms will inevitably come; the tragedy is that avoidable manmade disasters will follow.

After Hurricane Katrina, many talked about New Orleans schools as a "clean sheet of paper." People bandied around phrases like "starting from scratch" and "wipe the slate clean" - anything that treated teachers, students and parents as if they were as easily erased as drawings on an Etch A Sketch. It seems that many considered the people who worked in public schools prior to the storm as collateral damage for the grand New Orleans experiment (another worn-out phrase).

If there is one lesson we should learn from past disaster recovery efforts, it is that people can't be erased. Even in death people have value; history and culture remain. Sometimes the public school a person attended embodies the spirit of a grandmother who convenes family members for holidays and special occasions. Communities protect the names of schools as they would a relative.

Establishing a sense of normalcy - getting a school back on its feet - is like finding a lost loved one. Education reform, on the other hand, is "disruptive" in nature, not restorative. Even though the school being reformed may have had problems before the disaster, those who attended the school had invested in its improvement. To wipe the slate clean is to deny people the opportunity to capitalize on their investments, as well as to recover on their own terms.

As Florida L. Woods, then-principal of Paul L. Dunbar Elementary School, said a month after the storm: "The people who were there should be the ones given the opportunity to rebuild . . . We know the history, we know the culture of the city, the district, and the people."

Sure, rebuilding school buildings and improving systems are worthy goals after any disaster. But Hurricane Katrina blew a window of opportunity wide open for New Orleans reformers to jam through a mostly predetermined agenda of disempowering the New Orleans Public School Board. In the weeks after the storm, the Louisiana legislature changed its previous definition of an academically failing school to be able to take control of the vast majority of schools in the city. As a consequence, New Orleans experienced rapid educational upheaval while people attempted to recover from trauma caused by the storm.

The reform agenda led to a state takeover, the expansion of charter schools, an introduction to school choice via the removal of geographic attendance zones, as well as a radical racial shift in teachers. An infusion of federal and philanthropic cash supported these efforts - not all of which were focused on establishing a sense of normalcy.

Now, in the wake of Hurricane Harvey (and Irma), someone else will see an opportunity to reform dozens of severely damaged schools in the name of disaster recovery.

The people directly affected by the storm should be the architects of their own recovery. In other words, reform shouldn't be done to the community; it should be undertaken by the community.

In this regard, recovering cities should take the time they need to make sure exclusion from the recovery process doesn't prolong the damage caused by the storm.

Officials from the Houston Independent School District have postponed the already deferred September 11 start date for all of its 215,000 students as the entire region scrambles to assess the damage from Hurricane Harvey. Damage to 115 schools, including 22 that HISD deemed extensively damaged, forced district leaders to place approximately 10,000 students in schools not originally assigned to them.

Houston and other cities can learn a lot from the restructuring of New Orleans' school system. For instance, local and state entities worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to do a collective assessment of the damage and negotiated a $1.8 billion lump sum grant, rather than doing a school-by-school assessment, thereby ensuring that every student could have a new or refurbished school.

But erecting new buildings takes years (more than five, in the case of New Orleans). In the meantime, while students study in schools not originally assigned to them, their mental health takes priority. Already traumatized by the storm, students will have difficulty adjusting to new school environments thrust upon them. There's less to worry about in regards to academic performance. After expected dips in academic performance due to interruptions and understandable distractions in the aftermath of Katrina, New Orleans students caught up or may have even exceeded expectations in their new schools. But this isn't enough of a reason to cause havoc in kids' lives. Academics are an important, but by no means the only, consideration in a post-disaster environment.

Students in Houston will need psychological support to help manage post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health disorders, such as depression. The prevalence of serious mental illness doubled in New Orleans residents, and nearly half of the respondents exhibited probable PTSD in the wake of Katrina, according to several researchers who published their findings in the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry.

My colleague Jon Valant at the Brookings Institution writes that children are resilient, especially academically, but he cites research showing that their physical and mental health needs must also be addressed. Rationalizing radical change in the midst of recovery based on the potential of increased test scores is ill-timed at best - at worst, it's paternalistic and painfully insensitive to the needs of the child.

And then there's the stress on the adults who work in schools. Of the more than 7,000 employees who were terminated from New Orleans schools in the months after Katrina by the Orleans Parish School Board, approximately 4,300 were teachers, 71 percent of whom were black, and 78 percent of whom were women. Not only did this negatively impact the black middle-class of the entire city, it emasculated the black community as a whole, which still feels the sting of that decision today.

Those affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma and future storms should certainly look back to post-Katrina recovery efforts to help their cities and schools recover faster and stronger. The storms will keep on coming, and opportunities to improve schools will always present themselves. But man-made disasters in education require a different response.

We may need education reform, but disguising reform as recovery is like tossing a book on how to swim to a person who's drowning.

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

-

Previously by Andre Perry:
* Black And Brown Kids Don't Need To Learn 'Grit,' They Need Schools To Stop Being Racist.

* Why Black Lives Matter Should Take On Charter Schools.

* Don't Be Surprised If Colin Kaepernick Prompts More Schoolchildren To Sit For The Pledge Of Allegiance.

* "Wraparound" Services Are Not The Answer.

* Youth Aren't Props.

* NOLA's Secret Schools.

* Poor Whites Just Realized They Need Education Equity As Much As Black Folk.

* Letting Our Boys Onto The Football Field Is A Losing Play.

* America Has Never Had A Merit-Based System For College Admissions.

-

See also:

* Hurricane McQueary.

* The Apology Kristen McQueary Should Have Written.

-

Trib Editor: We Didn't Get It Wrong, Readers Did!

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:10 AM | Permalink

September 18, 2017

FCC Presses Sinclair For Answers On Tribune Merger

"The FCC has formally requested additional information from Sinclair in their bid to merge with Tribune."

FCC Presses Sinclair for Answers on Tribune Merger by Allied Progress on Scribd

-

More at Allied Progress.

-

Previously:
* Item: Former Trump Aide Joins Sinclair.

* Trump's FCC Chair Continues To Shaft The Public, Offer Major Handouts To Big Media.

* Trump-Friendly Sinclair's Takeover Of Tribune TV Stations Brought To You By Trump's FCC Chairman.

* Jonathan Pie, TV Reporter! Make The Air Fair.

* 'Maybe The Worst FCC I've Ever Seen.'

* A Pair Of Decades-Old Policies May Change The Way Rural America Gets Local News.

* Tribune's Disastrous Sale To Sinclair.

* Lawmakers Demand Answers About FCC's Favoritism Toward Sinclair.

* Can Anyone Stop Trump's FCC From Approving A Conservative Local News Empire?

* Sinclair's Flippant FCC Ruling.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:31 PM | Permalink

The [Monday] Papers

Chicago River Deer.

Chicago River Deer

A post shared by Sarah Mitchell (@mitchpickle) on

-

From frequent Beachwood contributor Steve Balkin, Roosevelt University professor emeritus:

Chicago Efforts To Stop Genocide Of Rohingya People In Myanmar

Here is a link to my flickr photo album of 102 photos of a rally held September 6, 2017 in the Federal Plaza of Chicago for the Rohingya people of Myanmar (formerly known as Burma).

They are victims of extreme violence and genocide as the Myanmar military engages in ethnic cleansing, pushing them off their land and homes.

One of the protest signs reads, "Never Again. Happening Again," which is especially touching to me, a Jewish person who lost family members in the Holocaust.

Burma Task Force USA has a Chicago office: E-mail: info@BurmaMuslims.org. Phone: (312) 750-1178

They are looking for volunteers to help increase advocacy for the Rohingya in the USA and also to provide tutoring and assimilation help to Rohingya refugees living in Chicago at the Rohingya Culture Center.

-

See also:

Tribune: Persecuted Rohingya Muslims Find Rare Refuge In Chicago.

*

"The center is a community space for maintaining the Rohingya refugee community's identity, learning the English language, and developing the social skills necessary to integrate into the new society that has adopted them."

*

-

Chicagoetry: 77 Minutes After 8
What else is a sky like me to do at times but rain?

-

Bears: From Moral Victory To Immoral Lost
Twitter is lit.

-

Coffman: The Best Part Of The Bears Game
"For all intents and purposes it was over by the time the Cubs contest started further down the dial."

-

TrackNotes: The Immortal Penny Chenery
"She seen her duty and she done it."

-

The White Sox Report: Ending Up
The future is arriving.

-

BeachBook

Can The White Sox Turn This 27-Year-Old Into The Perfect Manager?

*

The Bodega Pundit.

*

La Croix's Natural Flavors Were Not A Mystery.

*

Evanston Going From Boot To Barnacle.

*

Donald Trump Is Also A Male Supremacist.

*

Aaron Rodgers, Unmasked.

*

The Thankless Task Of Being Michael Moore.

*

No, Native Americans Aren't More Genetically Susceptible To Alcoholism.

*

How Well-Meaning Nonprofits Perpetuate Poverty.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Sane clown posse.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 11:58 AM | Permalink

Chicagoetry: 77 Minutes After 8

77 Minutes After 8

Way past 8
I met my intimates
Hugo Himself and Mike Miracle

To watch the proxy war
On the big screen
At the Proxy bar

In the Village
On Damen near where
Sweet Alice used to be,

Mesmerized
By the plethora
Of chyrons,

Petting our peeves,
Fanning our fears,
Newest amongst them

The shrill shriek of a car engine
Suddenly revving.
We rescinded all

Immodest demands
And relished the miracle
Of our true selves.

I'd been raining all day
But my intimates
Forgave me, for

What else is a sky
Like me to do
At times but rain?

Forgiveness
Is the miracle
Of friendship.

I'd rained so much
The river rose

So the tour boats
Couldn't fit
Under the bridges.

I surely was the rain but not
The thunder; that's God
Singing in the shower.

And if God is, in fact,
Father, imagine the pain
He must feel,

His holy heart
A dead farm.
He could use a hearty song.

We three chuckled
At our lucky trinity
(We've only lost one brother

To the endless War),
Three "Be Movies"
Vowing to remain

Authentic as we laughed
Under assumed names.

-

J.J. Tindall is the Beachwood's poet-in-residence. He welcomes your comments. Chicagoetry is an exclusive Beachwood collection-in-progress.

-

More Tindall:

* Chicagoetry: The Book

* Ready To Rock: The Music

* Kindled Tindall: The Novel

* The Viral Video: The Match Game Dance

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:53 AM | Permalink

SportsMonday: The Best Part Of The Bears Game

In one way, the Bears game on Sunday worked out perfectly. For all intents and purposes it was over by the time the Cubs contest started further down the dial.

I'm not going to join the mob baying for a change at quarterback. Does anyone really believe Mitch Trubisky will have a legitimate shot at success this season with the roster general manager Ryan Pace has put together for the Bears? He will not. And that is definitely enough about that monstrosity of a football game.

But I will join a much better kind of mob: the one raucously celebrating the Cubs pulling out another win and burying the Cardinals once and for all in 2017. It was a great weekend of baseball capped off by the team hanging on by the tips of their breaking-ball spinning fingernails to win 4-3 on Sunday. How close was this to a loss? It was a close as giving up two hits and two walks, but no runs, in an eighth inning. It was as close as a fly ball to deepest center with the tying run on base . . . caught on the warning track. But the Cubs pulled it out to take a six-game lead on the Cards with 13 to play.

The weekend began with Kyle Hendricks putting on a clinic on how to pitch and how to act. One great thing about watching baseball on TV is that you have such a better view of pitches. And so it was that it was obvious in the first two innings alone that Hendricks threw one, two, three pitches that were clearly, easily in the strike zone that were called balls. He threw another one, right on a corner, called a ball.

So what did he do? He stayed completely cool, like he always does. The place could have been a powder keg on Saturday after John Lackey's tantrum the day before, a pathetic display that could have cost the Cubs that game and two more after he sucked in catcher Willson Contreras. Both players were tossed from a one-run game before the fifth inning was over and Contreras was later suspended for two games after he slammed his mask down and it bounced into the umpire.

The fact that it was par for the course for the incredibly immature Lackey (the dude is right on the edge of 40 years old for goodness sakes), didn't make it any better. And the fact that Cubs rallied for seven runs in the next inning was baseball happenstance. Lackey's tirade had nothing to do with it.

The next day, home plate ump Carolos Torres is missing calls right and left and Hendricks responds by . . . putting up his glove, catching the throw from his catcher and preparing to make the next pitch.

Shockingly enough, it was a much better strategy. Hendricks just kept throwing strikes and got out of the inning. He faced his toughest challenge of the day in the next inning when, despite Torres gaining a better grasp of the zone, the Cardinals loaded the bases with one out and the dangerous Tommy Pham (the guy who consistently hit the ball the hardest for the visitors all weekend) coming up.

Hendricks threw him a slider that seemed to stay too far up but Pham hit a ground ball to short that resulted in the inning-ending double play. As Hendricks then cruised through the next four innings, he got more calls than he didn't, in part because he is remarkably consistent and in part because he kept his cool when it mattered most.

The Cubs eventually won 4-1, the last run coming on Addison Russell's blast of a solo home run in his first at-bat since being out a month-and-a-half with a foot injury. It was such a memorable moment at the end of a memorable game.

On Sunday, Brian Duensing survived that scary eighth inning on the mound and Wade Davis got his 31st consecutive save in the ninth despite that scary fly ball off the bat of Dexter Fowler. (Having Davis pitch the ninth for the third straight day was probably managerial malpractice but the Cubs 'pen has been hit by a few injuries so we'll cut Joe Maddon some slack, especially with an off day today.) The Cubs roll on this week with two in Tampa starting Tuesday night and four in Milwaukee.

Sunday's victory also meant that the Brewers lost two games in the standings to the Cubs, despite going 4-2 this past week, aided by the switching of a series from Florida to Milwaukee this past weekend due to hurricane-related issues. The Cubs went 6-0.

But it could have been worse for Milwaukee. They could decimated their depth by trading four draft picks for one for a quarterback the team is now afraid to start (sorry about this rather awkward segue but it is time to wrap this thing up).

The worst thing about all the people out there yelling and screaming for Trubisky is that it is just so old. Meatball sports fans have been calling for teams to throw out the bum starter and bring in the backup quarterback since George Halas was still playing.

In the aftermath of Sunday's loss, I say all the team's assistant coaches have obviously underperformed. They must be fired and it should have been done yesterday. Actually, Bears, just try to keep it relatively quiet over there for the next month. We still almost certainly have that much time left to focus on the Cubs.

-

Jim "Coach" Coffman welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:48 AM | Permalink

Ending Up

The pennant races have ended. The Dodgers, Cubs, Nationals, Astros, Red Sox and Indians have either clinched or are confidently in command of their respective divisions with two weeks to go in the 2017 baseball season.

There is just one more wild card playoff spot to be determined - between the Twins, 103-game losers just a year ago, and the Angels.

What with the NFL season underway and the Blackhawks skating to get in shape for the 2017-18 campaign, why would anyone continue to keep an eye on baseball?

Until they got beat 4-3 in Kansas City last Friday night, the Cleveland Indians certainly were in the national spotlight as they ran up 22 straight victories. But few noticed that the Tribe ran off two more wins over the weekend to make it 24 out of 25 to clinch the Central Division. Can they top the Astros for the league's best record? Maybe so, but outside of Cleveland and Houston, who cares?

Nevertheless, historically once the pennant and/or wild card races are decided, there have been instances worth noticing as the season winds down.

Long ago in 1941, then 23-year-old Ted Williams sported a .39955 batting average on the final day of the season. Rounded up, Williams would have entered the record books with a .400 average, a feat that hadn't been attained since 1925 when Rogers Hornsby hit .403 and hasn't been reached since. (Hornsby his .400 three times in his 23-year career.)

Red Sox manager Joe Cronin, whose team finished second, 17 games behind the Yankees, intimated to Williams that he could sit out a season-closing doubleheader against the last-place Philadelphia A's. It's a fairly well-known fact that Teddy Ballgame said, "No way." With an ego that even Fenway Park couldn't contain, Williams didn't see himself as a .400 hitter since he was .00045 away from that magic mark. He proceeded to go 6-for-8 in the twinbill to finish at .406.

A few other tidbits from that season attract attention. Williams led the American League with 37 home runs while driving in 120. He walked 147 times, more than anyone in the league, bringing his slash line to .406/.553/1.287. In 606 plate appearances, he struck out just 27 times.

Obviously, Williams was the league's most valuable player. Well, not so fast. That was the same campaign in which Joe DiMaggio hit safely in 56 consecutive games, and Joe played in New York on a pennant winner. He was MVP.

Here's one more. For former players who have died, Baseball Reference provides the date of death and where the individual is buried. For Williams, it says, "Buried: Frozen."

Compare Williams' intrepid performance with Jose Reyes in 2011 when the Mets' shortstop was locked in a battle with Milwaukee's Ryan Braun for the National League batting title. Going into the season's final game, Reyes was hitting .336, just a point higher than Braun. In a totally meaningless game against the Reds - the Mets finished 77-85 while Cincinnati was a third-place team as Braun's Brewers were division champs - Reyes led off the bottom of the first inning and bunted for a base hit to raise his average to .337. Choosing not to swing away might have been enough to thaw Teddy Ballgame.

At that point, Mets manager Terry Collins pulled Reyes for a pinch runner, "leaving the boisterous crowd momentarily dumbfounded," as the New York Times reported. Now even Rogers Hornsby was rolling around in his grave.

As things turned out, Braun went 0-for-4, making Reyes the league's top hitter. Since then, Reyes has never hit higher than .296.

After the game, Collins' meeting with the press was epic.

"I wanted to take him out at the appropriate time," said Manager Terry Collins, who met with Reyes before the game to discuss possible outcomes. "He said if he got a hit his first time out, he'd like to come out. It was decided then . . . "

"I understand," said Collins of the scattered jeers. "I heard some comments from the stands. I don't blame them. People pay a good price to come to these games. You got to understand that I ask these players to do a lot . . .

Collins began to cry and did not finish the sentence. Then, after 15 seconds, still fighting tears, he continued, "We worked hard to get their respect this year, and they deserve ours."

Let's also consider the player hitting just below .300 the final day of the season. Foremost in his mind is his agent negotiating a contract or going to arbitration where hitting .300 is a strategic tool possibly worth as much as a seven-figure number. A pair of Wharton professors, Devin Pope and Uri Simonsohn, studied hitters from 1975 to 2009 who were hitting .299 in their final at-bat of the season.

What did the scholars learn? That over the course of 34 years, not one of these players drew a base on balls. They swung at everything in their quest to hit .300.

As we enter the final weeks of the season, the athletes of the rebuilding White Sox have more than individual numbers motivating them. Many are auditioning to remain members of a team whose future prospects look more promising with each passing day.

Despite the fact that the Sox lost four straight to the Indians, who were beating everyone, the ballclub has had a decent September, even considering that they were almost no-hit Sunday in Detroit. Tim Anderson's ninth-inning, two-out double was the lone safety off Tiger lefthander Matt Boyd.

That loss left Rick Renteria's crew with an 8-9 mark for the month, not so horrible for a team that is 29 games under .500.

The offense has come alive with a team batting average of .288 and an average of almost 5 1/2 runs per game for the month. The Sox have recorded double digits in hits nine times in September and even slammed out 25 knocks last Thursday in beating Detroit 17-7.

Individually, Avisail Garcia is hitting .394 this month after posting a .423 mark in August. Jose Abreu is sailing along at .344 the past 17 days with five homers and 17 RBI. He's just three RBI short of 100, the fourth straight season he'll reach the century mark. Anderson is hitting .418 in September, and he's stolen seven bases in as many attempts. While he still leads the major leagues with 26 errors, he's yet to make an error this month.

And top prospect Yoan Moncada has raised his average from .188 to .227 by hitting .302 with three home runs and seven RBI.

Meanwhile, Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez and Carson Fulmer, three young pitchers who spent most of the season at Charlotte, have been truly impressive this month. In three starts and almost 19 innings, Giolito is 1-1, giving up a paltry 10 hits, walking eight and fanning 18. His ERA is 2.41 for September.

Fulmer has pitched in four games, two in relief with as many starts. In 16-plus innings, he's struck out 17 while allowing only nine hits and six walks for a 1.62 ERA. And Lopez is 2-2 in four starts, having pitched at least six innings in all of them. He's walked only five batters over 25 innings with a 3.96 ERA.

This has been an entertaining team to watch the past few weeks. The individual numbers are fun to track, but it's apparent that this young team is playing out the string, not merely for person accomplishments for contract time, but to win as many games as possible. That's certainly miles apart from a guy bunting for a hit in the first inning and then being replaced by a pinch runner.

-

Former Bill Veeck bar buddy Roger Wallenstein is our White Sox correspondent. He welcomes your comments.

-

1. From Terry Yale Feiertag:

Bill Terry of the Giants hit .401 in 1930.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:23 AM | Permalink

TrackNotes: The Immortal Penny Chenery

And then, on a beautiful Sunday, you get punched in the stomach.

Penny Chenery, the owner and elegant human representative of the magnificent Secretariat, passed away Saturday in Boulder, Colorado. She was 95. But immortal to me.

I learned a few new things about her today. Including an affair she had with Secretariat's trainer, Lucien Laurin.

But her always honest reflections taught us once more.

"It may spoil my image," Ms. Chenery told the Lexington Herald-Leader in discussing her revelation of the affair with Laurin, who died in 2000. "I don't know, and at this point I don't care. It was a tremendous experience for me to go through the Secretariat years, and I just really wanted to let people know what it's like to have a top horse and no one to turn to."

That last part is so revealing, as everyone in the world fell in love with Big Red. I remember reveling in the horse, too, but I always got a kick out of seeing Mrs. Tweedy (at the time by marriage) as much at a loss of words as we were. The responsibility, and burdens, she shouldered with such a horse had to be so much a weight on her. The entire racing world, and fans, civilians in the saddle, knew he was such a phenomenon, multiplying every day, knew how special Secretariat was and it became her job to see that he fulfilled his tremendous potential. She did it.

I said it once before, and I can't say it any better today.

After his planetary victory in the Belmont Stakes, "Secretariat's owner, Penny (Chenery) Tweedy, hugged those around her, flashing the now-famous smile. She waved her arms to the crowd, as if to say 'This is great, isn't it?'"

I had the great pleasure to write about Secretariat for the Beachwood, tied in with the release of Disney's movie Secretariat.

I hated it, as you might have read, and I'm happy Ms.Chenery didn't like it much either.

The movie's director Randall Wallace, subservient to the fraudulent Disney, didn't shy away from his motives.

"Obviously, one can romanticize it all, but I think Penny Chenery had a sense that connected her to the horse," Wallace said when the movie was released. He turned it into a commercial, a Biblical parable.

Full of grace and diplomacy, Ms. Chenery pooh-poohed, the first four words saying it all. "Ms. Chenery dismissed the suggestion of a mystical tie. As she told The Times: 'It's a Disney movie. No, we didn't have a spiritual connection. We had a mutual respect, but he didn't stand still long enough for me to look in his eye and say a prayer.'"

But she knew what she had and what she had to do. From a bit of a distance for her, Riva Ridge in 1972 had cusped the Triple Crown, winning the Kentucky Derby and Preakness before defeat in the Belmont. She syndicated Secretariat for $6.08 million, a record at the time, in part to keep Meadow Stables viable.

She built the barn on the strength of broodmares. Secretariat sired a few good colts, but his strength in the shed was with extending the lineage of his mother, Somethingroyal. His progeny on the dam side were highly respectable.

As I researched the series, I couldn't help but escape the human aspect of the story. Laurin acted cool. Jockey Ron Turcotte acted like he didn't give a damn; just another horse. But he knew, too.

But Ms. Chenery, with all humility and honesty, stood out front, answered all the questions, an "I dunno" thrown in from time to time, reveling in the horse as much as we did. Watching his wins just like the rest of us fans - Secretariat was unbettable by then - seemingly saying "I don't know what he's going to do either."

Ms. Chenery said she never had a chance to look Secretariat in the eye, but I think she did. She once said that "He knows who he is and what he can do. He just loves to run, and we love to watch him run. He knows that."

Sounds to me like she knew him well enough. And knew about racing, and knew about racing fans.

There's a real old line: "She seen her duty and she done it."

That is life, achieved.

This one hurts.

-

Tom Chambers is our correspondent on the rail. He welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:04 AM | Permalink

Bears: From Moral Victory To Immoral Loss

The clock restarts on Johnny Foxhole.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:01 AM | Permalink

September 16, 2017

Dem Group Files Ethics Complaint Against Sarah Huckabee Sanders For Calling On ESPN To Fire Jemele Hill

New York, NY - The Democratic Coalition announced today that it has filed an ethics complaint against White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders with the Office of Government Ethics for her comments calling on ESPN host Jemele Hill to be fired.

The group cited Sanders' possible violation of federal law which makes it a crime for a government employee to influence "a private entity's employment . . . solely on the basis of partisan political affiliation."

"When Sarah Huckabee Sanders called for Jemele Hill to be fired by ESPN, she crossed the line and put herself in dubious legal territory," said Jon Cooper, chairman of the Democratic Coalition. "Even in Donald Trump's America, there's still such a thing as freedom of speech. For Sanders to publicly call for the dismissal of a Trump critic is bizarre and disturbing, to say the least. If anyone is to be fired, it should be her."

Sanders' comments came shortly after Hill called President Donald Trump a "white supremacist" in a tweet, saying during a press briefing on Wednesday that it was a "fireable offense."

18 U.S. Code § 227 makes it a federal crime - punishable by a fine or up to 15 years in prison - for an employee in Sanders' role to influence or threaten to influence a private employment decision. On Wednesday, Sanders said, "That's one of the more outrageous comments that anyone could make and certainly something that I think is a fireable offense by ESPN."

"This is yet another example of the Trump White House's blatant disregard for the Constitution and its authoritarian efforts to quiet dissenters. It is of the utmost importance that we hold the Trump administration accountable for this illicit behavior and protect our democratic institutions," added Nate Lerner, the group's executive director.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:33 PM | Permalink

The Weekend Desk Report

They're not the only ones.

#flicksonflash #daca #supportdaca #chicagolife #chicagograffiti #raven #moschicago2017 #moschicago

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

-

Beachwood Sports Radio: Joe Maddon Don't Need No Stinkin' Meetings
Inside the Cubs' volatile stretch run. Plus: Bears Strangely Competent; White Sox' Future . . . Here?; Blackhawks' Future . . . Here?; South Parking Lot Saga; Stupid CFL; Amateur Doping; and Schweinsteiger!

-

Beachwood Photo Booth: Devilish Dr. Phil
Reflective.

-

The Week In Chicago Rock
Is in pre-production.

-

Weekend BeachBook

Pro-Trump, Anti-Hillary Facebook Group That Spread Fake News And Organized Anti-Immigrant Rallies Across Texas Linked To Russia.

*

Trump Appointed Republican Who Counted Jews In Government Agency For Nixon.

*

Merely An Empire: 18 Hours In Vietnam.

This is really good.

*

The Strange World Of Sorority Consultants.

More like The Strange, Oppressive, Horrible World Of Sororities, The Greek System And The Dominant Culture Generally.

*

After 44 Years, Elgin May Be Getting Ice Cream Trucks!

*

Which Illinois State Fair Grandstand Concerts Made, Lost Money.

*

Things ESPN Should Apologize For, Including That Yelling Show And The Other Yelling Show.

-

Weekend TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

The Weekend Tronc Line: Tip jar.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 11:41 AM | Permalink

September 15, 2017

Beachwood Photo Booth: Devilish Dr. Phil

Reflective.

drphil.jpg(ENLARGE FOR PROPER VIEWING)

-

More Chicago photography from Helene Smith.

-

Helene on Twitter!

-

Meet Helene!

-

Stationery, iPhone cases, hoodies.

-

Listen to Helene talk about Photo Booth; starts at 57:54.

-

Previously:
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Man Grilling
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Yum Yum Donuts
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Father's Day
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vintage Airmaster
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Time
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Shade
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Illinois Slayer
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Fire Escape
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Nugget
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hollywood, Chicago
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flag Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Van In Flames.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fluid Power Automation.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Corn Dog.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop The Killing Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Backyard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A to Z Things.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Swedish Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Rothschild Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Silos.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Wires.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Orange Garden.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Irving Park Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Pigeons.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Lanagan's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: For Rent.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Pizza & Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mori Milk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Breakfast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Chicago Christmas Postcard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Harold's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Family Fun.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snow Bike.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nativity Scene.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Warsaw.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deluxe Cleaners.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Golden Cue.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Die Another Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sears Key Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jeri's Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Barry's Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Liberty.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Kitchen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Specials.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Won The Cup.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartender Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Plane Blues.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Finest Quality.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Family Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Girls Wanted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skokie Savanna.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Signpost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Man And The Tree.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Street Fleet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Citgo Story.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fantasy Hair Design.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Garage.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Clark Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pole Position.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Geometry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Found Love.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fill In The Blank.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vacuums Of The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dumpster Still Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wagon Master.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Intersecting West Rogers Park.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Antiques.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cow Patrol.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Backstage Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skully Bungalow.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Francisco Frankenstein.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Long Cool Heat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Smokers' Mast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Big Fat Phone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Happy Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alley Men.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Show!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You've Got Mailbox.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Broken Window Theory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dali Logan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Svengoolie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Horner Park Hot Dogs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cubs Rehab.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 20th Century Schizoid Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Men On Vans.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Is Done.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snowy Lincoln.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Waiting Room.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Avondale Chicken.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Winter's End.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Friendly Skies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boyhood Buzzer Beater.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: J Date.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: International Window Lady.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shanghai Inn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Open For Business.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Andersonville Unplugged.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 3-Flat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Turkey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicagolandia.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Eat At Odge's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deitch Pharmacy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sud-Z Bubble.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bands Wanted!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Belmont Tavern.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Superheroic San Luis Freeze.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Oasis.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lyndale Food & Jewelry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Book Window.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alco Dude.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ballin Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Worry, Be Cookie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Four Trey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Office.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America From Inside The Golden Nugget In Ravenswood.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cellphone Repair.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boots 'N' Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunrise Strip.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: At The Corner Of Glad And Happy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Uptown Autumn Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mid-Century Modern Halloween.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Autumn Station Wagon.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Betty's & Nick's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ohio House Impact.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: End School Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Portage Park Peek-A-Boo.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: South Side Sundown.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Susie's Drive-Thru.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Ham.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Food & Liquor, Milhouse.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Hare Blue Line Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Schwing!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ad Deluxe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jesus At The Drive-In.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Tanks Of Avondale.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Conveyance Belt.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Esquire In The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nick's Meat Market.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Keep Havin A Good Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Knock Knock.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Man At Marie's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonneville.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Logan Bags.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Stairwell.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Velvet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Court Is In Session.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: DLER ALKY.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Railyards Rush Hour.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop Killing People.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 1.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Greystone Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You Are Beautiful.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Auto Part Overlords.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bearground.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 2.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skyway Sculpture.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Dome Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hello, St. Joe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Revolution Books.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Driveway.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Proceed To Checkout.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Summer Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Daily Double.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Are Moving.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 3.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunny Day Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ashland & Pawn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Party Store.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Donuts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: AAA Sales.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Rule.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Butcher Boy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Endorsement.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: I Voted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pink(ish) Cadillac.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stuffed With Sadness.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Air.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Economy Heating.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Season's Greetings.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Housemates.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Have Fresh Goat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartcam.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gaslight.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Urban Wheat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Embassy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln's Cozy Corner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Glory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bowling Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Red Lion, Red Hots.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Sitting.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Jukebox Is Not A Democracy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Descending Darkly.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Handicapped Milk Jug Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gumball Express.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicken Run.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wyoming, Michigan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bus Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Manzana.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Look Back.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mail Call.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gas Pump No. 8.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Photo Shoot.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flotos' Gifts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shelf Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: S&M Carpets.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Elvis At The Golden Nugget.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wunder's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Daisies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Supply Line.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sal's Barber Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Classy Oogle Queen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cloudy Gate.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cherry Pie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lannings' Crossing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:19 PM | Permalink

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #169: Joe Maddon Doesn't Need No Stinkin' Meetings

Inside the Cubs' volatile stretch run. Plus: Bears Strangely Competent; White Sox' Future . . . Here?; Blackhawks' Future . . . Here?; South Parking Lot Saga; Stupid CFL; Amateur Doping; and Schweinsteiger!


-

SHOW NOTES

* 169.

:23: No Meetings Maddon.

* Not Into It.

* Pepper Martin: The Wild Horse Of The Osage.

* Jen-Ho Tseng, Taylor Davis Feel Nerves In First Cubs Starts.

* Jesus, Christ! Jose Quintana!

* Baezian™!

* Maddon Planning To Use Wade Davis For More Than 3 Outs.

* Two More Hours To Not Come To The Ballpark!

37:27: The White Sox' Future Is . . . Here?

* The Big Three.

38:41: The Blackhawks' Future Is . . . Here?

39:36: The Competent Bears.

* Trubiskyites Terribly Wrong.

* Immobile Mike.

* Mea Culpa.

* Moral Victories Neither Moral Nor Victories.

* Tarik Cohen Disappointingly Not Jewish.

* Bernstein & Goff Owe Another Caller An Apology.

* Maybe It Wasn't Bobbie Massie's Fault!

* Football Is A Film Game!

* Kevin White Is A Bust But Was Not A Starter!

* Bears Were Not Hiding Adam Shaheen, He Just Sucks!

* Dion Sims Looks Good!

* Pernell McPhee Madness!

* Sam Acho Strangely Competent!

1:12:24: South Parking Lot Saga.

* Starring George McCaskey and David Haugh.

1:15:32: Tampa Test.

* Hoge Forgets Tampa Knows Glennon, Too.

1:17:46: Stupid CFL.

* Coffman: "They're still getting it wrong."

1:19:03: Amateur Doping.

1:19:39: Schweinsteiger!

* Playoff Push!

* Take A Party Bus, People!

-

STOPPAGE: 21:12!

-

For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:30 PM | Permalink

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. ChameleonsVox at the Chop Shop on Thursday night.


-

2. Soft Kill at the Chop Shop on Thursday night.

-

3. Pete Townshend, Eddie Vedder, Billy Idol, Alfie Boe, the Chicagoland Pops Orchestra and the Chicago Children's Choir at the Rosemont Theatre on Wednesday night.

-

4. Sugar Toolz at the Hideout on Wednesday night.

-

5. Blaze Ya Dead Homie at The Forge in Joliet on Tuesday night.

-

6. Kip Moore at Joe's Bar on Thursday night.

-

7. The David Forman Project at the Elbo Room on Wednesday night.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 3:59 PM | Permalink

September 14, 2017

The [Thursday] Papers

I hope to return to news analysis and commentary in this space next week.

In the meantime . . .

-

Make Credit Freezes Free In Illinois
"There is no reason why consumers should be charged a fee to place a credit freeze on their sensitive personal information."

-

How White People Were Invented
They didn't exist until 1613.

-

BeachBook

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Hero Was Originally Black.

*

Big Things, Small Town.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Laureate.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:54 AM | Permalink

How "White People" Were Invented By A Playwright In 1613

The Jacobean playwright Thomas Middleton invented the concept of "white people" on October 29,1613, the date that his play The Triumphs of Truth was first performed.

The phrase was first uttered by the character of an African king who looks out upon an English audience and declares: "I see amazement set upon the faces/Of these white people, wond'rings and strange gazes."

As far as I, and others, have been able to tell, Middleton's play is the earliest printed example of a European author referring to fellow Europeans as "white people."

A year later, the English commoner John Rolfe of Jamestown in Virginia took as his bride an Algonquin princess named Matoaka, whom we call Pocahontas.

The literary critic Christopher Hodgkins reports that King James I was "at first perturbed when he learned of the marriage."

But this was not out of fear of miscegenation; James's reluctance, Hodgkins explained, was because "Rolfe, a commoner, had without his sovereign's permission wed the daughter of a foreign prince."

King James was not worried about the pollution of Rolfe's line; he was worried about the pollution of Matoaka's.

Both examples might seem surprising to contemporary readers, but they serve to prove the historian Nell Irvin Painter's reminder in The History of White People that "race is an idea, not a fact."

Middleton alone didn't invent the idea of whiteness, but the fact that anyone could definitely be the author of such a phrase, one that seems so obvious from a modern perspective, underscores Painter's point.

By examining how and when racial concepts became hardened, we can see how historically conditional these concepts are. There's nothing essential about them.

As the literature scholar Roxann Wheeler reminds us in The Complexion of Race, there was "an earlier moment in which biological racism . . . [was] not inevitable."

Because Europeans didn't always think of themselves as "white," there is good reason to think that race is socially constructed, indeed arbitrary.

If the idea of "white people" (and thus every other "race" as well) has a history - and a short one at that - then the concept itself is based less on any kind of biological reality than it is in the variable contingencies of social construction.

There are plenty of ways that one can categorize humanity, and using color is merely a relatively recent one.

In the past, criteria other than complexion were used, including religion, etiquette, even clothing.

For example, American Indians were often compared with the ancient Britons by the colonizers, who were descendants of the Britons.

The comparison was not so much physical as it was cultural, a distinction that allowed for a racial fluidity.

Yet, by the time Middleton was writing, the color line was already beginning to harden, and our contemporary, if arbitrary, manner of categorizing races began to emerge.

The scholar Kim Hall explains in Things of Darkness that whiteness "truly exists only when posed next to blackness" - so the concept of "white people" emerged only after constructions of "blackness."

As binary oppositions, "whiteness" first needed "blackness" to make any sense. The two words create each other. The scholar Virginia Mason Vaughan writes in Performing Blackness on English Stages, 1500-1800 that "Blackfaced characters in early modern dramas are often used . . . to make whiteness visible."

Black and white have never referred to defined groups of people; they are abstract formulations, which still have had very real effects on actual people.

There is little verisimilitude in describing anyone with either term, which explains their malleability over the centuries.

How arbitrary is it to categorize Sicilians and Swedes as being "white," or the Igbo and Maasai as both "black?"

This kind of racial thinking developed as the direct result of the slave trade.

Hall explains: "Whiteness is not only constructed by but dependent on an involvement with Africans that is the inevitable product of England's ongoing colonial expansion."

As such, when early modern Europeans begin to think of themselves as "white people" they are not claiming anything about being English, or Christian, but rather they are making comments about their self-perceived superiority, making it easier to justify the obviously immoral trade and ownership of humans.

Hall explains that the "significance of blackness as a troping of race far exceeds the actual presence" of Africans within England at the time.

Before Middleton's play, there were a host of imagined "black" characters, such as in Ben Jonson's The Masque of Blackness , which featured Queen Anne performing in blackface, as well as Shakespeare's "noble Moor" in Othello, staged a couple of years before Middleton's play.

Understandings of race were malleable; in early modern writing, exoticized characters can be described as "dusky," "dun," "dark," "sable" or "black."

Depictions of an exoticized Other weren't only of Africans, but also Italians, Spaniards, Arabs, Indians, and even the Irish.

Middleton's play indicates the coalescing of another racial pole in contrast to blackness, and that's whiteness - but which groups belonged to which pole was often in flux.

Consider the Dark Lady of Shakespeare's sonnets. In sonnet 130, he says of his mysterious paramour that "her breasts are dun;" in sonnet 12, he references her "sable curls;" and in sonnet 127 he writes that "black wires grow on her head."

As is commonly understood, and taught, Shakespeare subverted the tradition exemplified by poets such as Petrarch who conceptualized feminine beauty in terms of fairness.

Part of this subversion lay in pronouncements such as the one that states that black is "beauty's successive heir," a contention of Shakespeare's that can seem all the more progressive when our contemporary racial connotation of the word is considered.

Thus, how much more radical is his argument in sonnet 132, that "beauty herself is black/And all they foul that thy complexion lack."

Shakespeare's racialized language connoted a range of possibilities as to how the Dark Lady's background could have been imagined, and the conjecture that she was based on women variously European or African indicates this racial flux in the period.

Or take Caliban, the native of the enchanted isle colonized by Prospero in The Tempest. Often sympathetically staged in modern productions as either an enslaved African or an American Indian, there are compelling reasons to think that many in a Jacobean audience would rather understand Caliban as being more akin to the first targets of English colonialism, the Irish.

By this criterion, Caliban is part of the prehistory of "how the Irish became white," as the historian Noel Ignatiev put it in 1995.

None of this is to say that Caliban is actually any of these particular identities, nor that the Dark Lady should literally be identified as belonging to any specific group either, rather that both examples provide a window on the earliest period when our current racial categorizations began to take shape, while still being divergent enough from how our racialized system would ultimately develop.

Yet our particular criteria concerning how we think about race did develop, and it did so in service to colonialism and capitalism (and their handmaiden: slavery).

Bolstered by a positivist language, the idea of race became so normalized that eventually the claim that anyone would have coined such an obvious phrase as "white people" would begin to sound strange.

But invented it was.

With the reemergence today of openly racist political rhetoric, often using disingenuously sophisticated terminology, it's crucial to remember what exactly it means to say that race isn't real, and why the claims of racists aren't just immoral, but also inaccurate.

Middleton demonstrates how mercurial race actually is; there was a time not that long ago when white people weren't "white," and black people weren't "black."

His audience was just beginning to divide the world into white and not, and, unfortunately, we remain members of that audience.

Race might not be real, but racism very much is. Idols have a way of affecting our lives, even if the gods they represent are illusory. In contemplating Middleton's play, we can gesture towards a world where once again such a phrase as "white people" won't make any sense.

In realizing that humans were not always categorized by complexion, we can imagine a future where we are no longer classified in such a way, and no longer divided as a result of it either.

This article was originally published at Aeon and has been republished under Creative Commons.

-

Comments welcome.

Aeon counter - do not remove

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:49 AM | Permalink

Regarding Equifax | Make Credit Freezes Free In Illinois

Consumer advocates praised the introduction of House Bill 4095, legislation to make credit freezes free for all Illinois residents, sponsored by Rep. Greg Harris (D-Chicago) and championed by Attorney General Lisa Madigan. Sen. Dan Biss (D-Evanston) has filed companion legislation in the Senate, Senate Bill 2230.

In response to the Equifax data breach, which has placed over 140 million Americans at risk for various forms of identity theft, consumer advocates and attorney generals have advised consumers to seriously consider placing a credit freeze with all three credit bureaus. A credit freeze is the only real tool consumers have to stop new account identity theft.

"There is no reason why consumers should be charged a fee to place a credit freeze on their sensitive personal information," said Abe Scarr, Illinois PIRG director. "We look forward to working with legislators from both parties to ensure Illinois residents have free access to this critical tool to protect their financial well-being."

Illinois residents currently have to pay a fee to access this basic security feature. State law provides exemptions for residents 65 or older, active duty service members, and victims of identity theft with a police report. HB4095 and SB2230 would allow all Illinois residents to place a freeze on their credit reports, or lift an existing freeze, for free.

Joining Illinois PIRG in supporting the legislation are Center for Changing Lives, Citizen Action Illinois, Digital Privacy Alliance, Heartland Alliance, Navicore Solutions, and Woodstock Institute.

"Given recent data breaches, there has never been a more critical time for this legislation," says Jody Blaylock, senior policy associate with the Heartland Alliance. "We must ensure that people, especially those experiencing poverty, can protect their credit and continue to build financial security."

Seven states have laws making credit freezes free, including Indiana. Illinois PIRG has this guide for consumers interested in placing a credit freeze with all three credit bureaus.

-

See also:

* 5.4 Million Illinois Residents Affected By Massive Equifax Data Breach.

* Chatbot Lets You Sue Equifax For Up To $25,000 Without A Lawyer.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:17 AM | Permalink

September 13, 2017

Why No Community Benefits Agreement For The Obama Library?

Nine months after Chicagoans lined up overnight for a chance to hear President Barack Obama's farewell address, Chicagoans are again lining up overnight to engage the officials responsible for the Obama Presidential Center and neighborhood developments.

They want to know: Why don't officials from the Obama Foundation, as well as the City of Chicago and University of Chicago, commit to a Community Benefits Agreement?

When: Sept. 13 (Wed.), 5:30 p.m. to Sept. 14 (Thurs.), 5:30 p.m.

First press conference Sept. 13 (Wed.) at 5:30 p.m.

Where: In front of Hyatt Regency McCormick Place, 2233 S. MLK Drive

Who: Obama Library South Side Community Benefits Agreement Coalition

About 20 residents from across neighborhoods affected by the Obama library will camp out and line up for the 24 hours preceding an Obama Foundation meeting.

At the meeting, officials will ask for "ideas on how the Obama Foundation can be a vital part of the South Side community."

Michelle Williams, a resident of a subsidized building across the street from where the library will be located, is participating in the camp-out and says "We are camping out and lining up so that we will be the first ones in the meeting so we can ask officials why they have avoided growing calls for a CBA."

A CBA should legally bind those institutions to deliver on their own promises for more/better jobs, business, housing, schools, transportation, and parks for the neighborhoods surrounding the future Obama library.

And it should bind together in one plan the many calls and opportunities of the groups and plans that are springing up around the Obama library. Thus, we all can realize the Obama library's exciting potential to support the kind of communities that President Obama fought for. And we can fight the history and threat of long-time residents' displacement.

As President Obama has said, "Communities ha[ve] to be created, fought for, tended like gardens."

#

ObamaCBA.org, @ObamaCBA

Mark your calendar: #GetItInWriting Summit: Sept. 20 (Wed.), 6 p.m., at Hyde Park Academy, 6220 S. Stony Island.

This event is organized by the Obama-Library CBA Coalition, led by the Bronzeville Regional Collective (BRC), Kenwood Oakland Community Org. (KOCO), Prayer and Action Collective (PAC), Southside Together Organizing Power (STOP) - with Chicago Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights.

Allied with Alliance of the Southeast (ASE), Brighton Park Neighborhood Council (BPNC), Chicago Jobs Council (CJC), Chicago Women in Trades (CWIT), Metropolitan Tenants Organization (MTO), Showing up for Racial Justice (SURJ), Wolfpack, Woodlawn East Community And Neighbors (WECAN).

-

See also:

Town Hall For An Obama Library Community Benefits Agreement, April 18, 2017.

Note: Video is first 15 minutes and last 15 minutes.

*

Longtime Residents Want Protections Put In Writing.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:40 AM | Permalink

The Voice Of Suka

In the 1990s, with only a 19th-century painting as a guide, the classically trained Polish musician, composer and teacher Maria Pomianowska painstakingly reconstructed the Bilgoraj suka and Plock fiddle, a lost medieval ancestor of the modern violin.

Since then, she has been crafting a new repertoire for the instrument, blending the plaintive melodies of Polish folk music with the flavors she has absorbed in her musical travels across North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. With earthy vocals and a small instrumental ensemble, she will spin a hypnotic musical experience invoking powerful ancient spirits.

"My main desire was to revive a playing technique with the idea of continuing the instruments' development," Pomianowska says.

What would we have if instruments of this type had not disappeared, but continued to develop, with performance techniques and repertoire expanding, acquiring new elements. The moods of traditional Polish music, reverberations of Persian and Indian melodies, and rhythms of the Middle and Far East have all made impressions on my heart. Thirty years of traveling throughout all of the continents has taught me that simple, old Polish instruments are capable of conversing in all the languages of the world.

Pomianowska has released over 20 recordings and is celebrated for her ability to revive ancient traditions as inspiration for music of our time. Whether interpreting Chopin's folk tunes with instrumentalists from a range of cultures or composing a piece commissioned by Yo-Yo Ma for cello and suka, there is no limit to her imagination and ability to plumb the depths of musical history to uncover new inspiration for the 21st century.

*

Maria Pomianowska & Reborn are Aleksandra Kauf (vocal, Bilgoraj suka, Mielec suka), Patrycja Napierala (drums), Iwona Rapacz (bass suka).

*

Thursday, Sept. 14 at 2:30 p.m.
Lecture Demonstration
Coe College
Cedar Rapids, IA

*

Friday, Sept. 15 at 1:30 p.m.
Lecture Demonstration
University of Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa

*

Saturday, Sept. 16 at 6 p.m.
Landfall Festival of World Music
CSPS HALL
1103 Third St SE
Cedar Rapids, IA
Suggested $10 donation at the door

*

Tuesday, Sept 19 at 4 p.m.
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
World Music Festival

Young Auditorium
930 W. Main Street
Whitewater, WI
Free

*

Saturday, Sept. 30 at 7:15 p.m.
Lotus World Music and Arts Festival
Buskirk-Chumley Theater
114 E Kirkwood Ave.
Bloomington, IN
Tickets

*

Sunday, Oct 1 at 4 p.m.
Lotus World Music and Arts Festival
Buskirk-Chumley Theater
114 E Kirkwood Ave.
Bloomington, IN
Tickets

*

Friday, Oct 6 at 8 p.m.
(door 7 p.m.)
The Cedar
416 Cedar Ave.
Minneapolis, MN
Tickets

*

More information.

-

At the Kennedy Center in August.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:33 AM | Permalink

The [Wednesday] Papers

Midnight oasis.

-

Why No Community Benefits Agreement For The Obama Library?
Meanwhile, dude calls for a Citizen Engagement Summit! Pure Obama.

-

The Voice Of Suka
"Maria Pomianowska has painstakingly reconstructed the Bilgoraj suka and Plock fiddle, a lost medieval ancestor of the modern violin."

-

BeachBook

Obama Was Bullshit.

*

The Otis Redding Story.

*

How Print And Radio Are Different.

*

Meet The Girl Scout Cookie Queen Of Chicago.

*

Find Out What Climate Change Sounds Like In A Chicago Courtyard.

*

Permanent Records Finds Its Angel.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Definitely maybe.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:00 AM | Permalink

September 12, 2017

The [Tuesday] Papers

Meeting of Styles!

#flicksonflash #chicagograffiti #moschicago2017 #moschicago #59&Western

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

*

#flicksonflash #chicagograffiti #moschicago #moschicago2017

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

*

*

-

Protect Rogers Park
Area man rallies neighbors.

-

WFLU-TV
Keep it down.

-

Art Institute: Past Forward
Architecture meets design.

-

Egg Island Almanac
The extraordinary in the ordinary.

-

Amateur Doping
Not just for elite athletes anymore.

-

The Weekend In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Diarrhea Planet, Masked Intruder, Brain Tentacles, Stevie Nicks, Heaven's Gateway Drugs, Aethereal, Red Plastic Buddha, Soft Candy, Magic Castles, The Orange Drop, High Wire, David Maxim Micic, Plini, Never Shout Never, Vince Neil, and Chase Atlantic.

-

Catching up with . . .

The Week In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Nots, Brockhampton, Deep Purple, and Alice Cooper.

The Weekend in Chicago Rock
Featuring: Blake, Ween, Kinky, Kelroy, Slavic Soul Party, Carnage, Tipper, Whethan, Deadmau5 and Eric Prydz, Damian Marley, Sheila Jordan, STS9, Johnny Blas Afro Libre, The Rooms, Jenna Przybysz, The Jonathan Doyle Swingtest with Joel Paterson, Infrared, Lonnie Smith, Jason Moran, Tom Fitzgerald, The David Forman Project, Kevin Morby, and John Mayer.

The Week In Chicago Rock
Featuring: Kelly Hogan and Casey McDonough, APED, Shelby Lynne and Allison Moorer, Olivia Newton-John, Depeche Mode, Green Day, Lady Gaga, Catfish and the Bottlemen, and the Zac Brown Band.

-

BeachBook

All You Need.

*

Remembering Pat Hill.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

Ditka telling Fox News's Jesse Waters why he supports Trump.

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Ibuproven.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:24 AM | Permalink

Protect Rogers Park

The city of Chicago sued the U.S. Justice Department last month for threatening to deny them public safety grants if they refuse to work closely with federal immigration enforcement.

Instead of waiting for court decisions, however, Gabe Gonzalez and a group of neighbors in Chicago took matters into their own hands.

Gonzalez worries about his undocumented friends in the diverse Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago. Even those with legal status, are living in an increasing state of fear.

"I hate bullies - I just hate them." Gonzalez says. "The thought that men with guns are going to come in these people's houses and take them away - you've got to do something."

Gonzalez is a professional community organizer. He and his wife have experience advocating for workers, women, immigrants and refugees. But neither of them had ever launched an organization of their own - until last February. They created an event page on Facebook and called for concerned people in Rogers Park to join them for a meeting at a neighborhood church. To their surprise, 500 people showed up eager to "do something" too. Their grassroots organization, Protect RP, was born.

The goal of Protect RP is to train volunteers in direct action techniques to defend people in their neighborhood from deportation. A team of volunteers developed a curriculum and, as shown in this video, they are now teaching people how to mobilize and confront ICE agents.

The group has already trained more than 100 volunteers on how to respond when someone calls the hotline.

The "rapid response" to a suspected raid unfolds immediately. Trained verifiers are the first on the scene, to document the action and confirm that the raid is real. Two volunteers developed a cellphone app that then serves as a "panic button." When it is triggered, it sends texts to alert people that a raid has begun. Undocumented residents know to stay clear, and activists know to gather at the scene.

Protect RP doesn't want to people to get arrested, says Gonzalez, "but we are using every tactic we have at our disposal to slow ICE down."

The group has studied ICE and determined that they have a tight schedule. The goal is to ruin that timetable.

Gonzalez is already sharing their training materials with organizations in Chicago and is happy to distribute them elsewhere.

This post first appeared on BillMoyers.com.

-

See also:

Today!

-

And:

Gonzalez talking about Protect RP in June on Live From The Heartland.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:15 AM | Permalink

WFLU-TV

Keep it down.


-

"Flu shots are available for all patients over age 6 months, parents, and caregivers. You can come in without an appointment at noon, 7 days/week, beginning Monday, September 18. Any changes to supply will be posted on our Facebook page, our website, or our phone message (312.642.5515 option 9)."

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:17 AM | Permalink

Egg Island Almanac

An endangered right whale attempting to nurse her new calf in the December ocean, foxgloves blooming in different places from year to year, or the rescue of imperiled Kemp's ridley sea turtles - the bounty and cruelty of nature infuses this latest collection of poems from Brendan Galvin, which takes as its maxim finding the extraordinary in the ordinary all around us.

The poems chronicle the waxing and waning of the seasons from one winter to the next in the area around Egg Island, the dunes near a small seacoast town on the outermost reaches of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

eggislandalmanac.jpg

Galvin's training as a naturalist and environmental writer is evident as his practiced eye roves the waves, marshes, and forests, finding meaning and beauty in the smallest detail - bird-watching, rebuilding a woodpile, or the flight of bobwhite quail.

Other poems recall the poet's affectionate memories of his deceased wife and the life they shared together, acknowledging grief without veering into the maudlin. Always present beneath the surface is the question of where humans fit into this wild, ever-changing landscape.

In meditations that recall the poetry and prose of Mary Oliver or W. S. Merwin, Galvin sets off on a vivid journey sure to increase readers' appreciation for the natural world. Perhaps his most compelling message is that readers need not jet off to Everest or Kilimanjaro to experience mystery and beauty on Earth - there's wonder aplenty in our own backyards.

Crab Orchard Series in Poetry

The Crab Orchard Series in Poetry began in 1998 as a co-publishing venture of the Crab Orchard Review literary journal (published by the English department at Southern Illinois University) and Southern Illinois University Press with a mission to publish some of the best new work by established and new voices in American poetry.

Each fall, the Crab Orchard Review sponsors an open competition for poetry manuscripts; the winners are then published in the series the following fall.

Each spring, the journal chooses a manuscript for their First Book Award as well as an editor's selection. These manuscripts are then published the following spring.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:51 AM | Permalink

At The Art Institute | Past Forward: Architecture and Design

"Curator Zoë Ryan introduces the new installation of the museum's collection of 20th- and 21st-century architecture and design, which presents the two as an integrated, ever-changing, and multilayered experience. Learn more."


-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:28 AM | Permalink

Amateur Doping

The 11th annual CrossFit Games took place last month.

While the event has come a long way from humble beginnings, the prize money and fame now attached to it have led to concerns that competitors may be doping to gain an unfair advantage.

CrossFit is a fitness regime practiced by people all around the world. But the majority of those who take part in its high-intensity competitive workouts are not elite athletes; they do so on an amateur level or recreationally.

The first CrossFit Games, in 2007, had 70 registered athletes competing for $500 in prize money. By 2017, it had more than 300,000 athletes competing for the possibility of winning $275,000. Games organizers have signed multimillion-dollar sponsorship and marketing contracts, and secured a multi-year TV deal with ESPN.

Evidence suggests that when sport becomes more commercialized, the prizes more lucrative and the competition fiercer, doping becomes more attractive for athletes.

The prevalence of doping among elite athletes in general is between 14% and 39%. The uncovering of recent scandals, such as the one revealed in the documentary Icarus, is further evidence that doping is widespread.

crossfitdope.jpg

Similarly, given the growing pressure to compete, its heavy physical demands and the quest for self-improvement and a winning edge, it is not unreasonable to think that similar percentages may exist in CrossFit.

Doping Is Not Exclusive To Elite Athletes

It is a misperception to think that performance-enhancing drug use is an issue in elite sport only. Most people who use these substances do so to improve their appearance, general well-being and/or performance (non-elite).

In the UK, steroid use among 16-to-24-year-old men increased fourfold in the last year.

In Australia, the dramatic increase in steroids detected at the borders and the number of users of needle and syringe programs suggest a similar story.

As such, there are concerns that performance-enhancing drug use is quickly becoming a public health crisis.

In our UK study on CrossFit, 13% of 123 participants reported having used performance- or image-enhancing drugs (mainly weight-loss drugs and steroids).

Participants mainly used these substances not to enhance their sport performance but to develop body image and/or for cosmetic purposes (50%), to lose weight (41.6%) and to put on size/gain weight (25%).

Doping As A Public Health Problem

Tackling doping has been largely left to the sporting arena. Sporting authorities mainly rely on testing and surveillance to combat doping. But the rise of doping among the general public has required governments to rethink their approach.

Some have simply applied elite sports' testing and surveillance model to recreational athletes. For example, in Denmark and Belgium, everyday gym-goers can be subjected to drug testing. If they test positive they can receive similar sanctions to professional athletes.

Other jurisdictions have gone the criminal justice route, enacting and intensifying laws against the consumption, possession and/or trafficking of these drugs.

Queensland in Australia, for instance, reclassified steroids as a schedule-one drug in 2014. This means they are classed alongside heroin, cocaine and ice in the highest category of dangerous illicit drugs, with penalties of up to 25 years' imprisonment for possession or supply of steroids.

Similar tough penalties apply in other Australian states.

From Anti-Doping To Health Promotion

The government must tackle the needs of this rapidly growing drug-using population. But simply copying failed sport policy, or taking two steps back via criminal justice measures, is the wrong approach.

Many sport researchers, including ourselves, have argued for an approach centered on public health that seeks to tackle the wider sociocultural reasons behind the rise in drug use, while seeking to reduce the harms associated with such use.

For example, it is increasingly recognized that social pressure to conform to idealized beauty standards, coupled with the growth of social media, has led to growing numbers of young people being unhappy with how they look.

A harm reduction-based program would accept that the use of performance- and image-enhancing substances occurs. Therefore, such an approach would focus on minimizing harms of use, using strategies such as peer education, prevention strategies, testing of the quality of drugs, and medical advice.

The current controls against anti-doping in sport are largely incompatible with this approach. It would require sport officials to accept doping as part of sport and to shift concerns away from the purity of sport and to the health of the athlete. We are a long way from having these sober discussions.

Thus, for now, our policy approach to this growing public health problem must learn to differentiate between the CrossFit Games athletes and the amateur/recreational CrossFitter, shifting from a punitive model largely reliant on deterrence to one centered on health promotion.

Kyle J.D. Mulrooney is a PhD Fellow, Doctorate in Cultural and Global Criminology, at the University of Kent. Katinka van de Ven is a Research Fellow, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, at UNSW. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

-

Comments welcome.

The Conversation

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:18 AM | Permalink

September 11, 2017

The Weekend In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Diarrhea Planet at the Wurst Music Fest at Randolph and Ogden on Friday night.


-

2. Masked Intruder at the Wurst Music Fest on Friday night.

-

3. Brain Tentacles at the Virgin on Friday night.

-

4. Stevie Nicks at Ravinia on Sunday night.

-

5. Heaven's Gateway Drugs at Livewire on Friday night.

-

6. Aethereal at Livewire on Friday night.

-

7. Red Plastic Buddha at Livewire on Saturday night.

-

8. Soft Candy at Livewire on Saturday night.

-

9. Magic Castles at Livewire on Saturday night.

-

10. The Orange Drop at Livewire on Saturday night.

-

11. High Wire at Township on Sunday night.

-

12. David Maxim Micic at Beat Kitchen on Saturday night.

-

13. Plini at Beat Kitchen on Saturday night.

-

14. Never Shout Never at Durty Nellie's in Palatine on Friday night.

-

15. Vince Neil at the Arcada in St. Charles on Saturday night.

-

16. Chase Atlantic at Bottom Lounge on Friday night.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:16 PM | Permalink

The [Monday] Papers

Superheroes.

Superhero lunch #street #streetphotography #Cosplay

A post shared by @gboozell on

*

#flicksonflash #meetingofstyles #moschicago2017 #moschicago

A post shared by FLASH ABC MARS (@flash_abc) on

*

*

#mileofmurals #rogersparkchicago #workinprogress #mural #ghasse

A post shared by Gretchen Hasse (@gbhasse) on

*

Just a good old puppers.

A post shared by Sarah Mitchell (@mitchpickle) on


-

SportsMonday: Bears Don't Totally Suck
But try to remain calm.

-

Wrongfully Convicted Man: Illinois Supreme Court Should Hear Civil Case
Alan Beaman has repeatedly sought to bring forth his civil suit since his exoneration.

-

The Chicago Tribune Presents Oprah's Boyfriend's Identity Seminar
"Your success is based on your willingness to be a leader of your own life."

-

Popular Online Feminism
The women's magazine formula.

-

The White Sox Report: Streaks
A record-setting week.

-

Wisconsin's Autumn Harvest
How to make the most of it.

-

The Weekend In Chicago Rock
I am so behind on this feature. I will catch up this week, I swear.

-

Programming Note
I'll get back to columns featuring the news, I'm just taking care of some other business right now.

-

BeachBook

Illinois Sheriff Sued For Ignoring State's New Trust Act Protecting Immigrants.

*

Brush Your Teeth And Get Vitamins Too?

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Unbuttoned.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:24 PM | Permalink

Making The Most Of Wisconsin's Autumn Garden Harvest

Most summer vegetable crops reach their peak of maturity by early autumn, and it's critical to harvest at the right time to ensure high quality produce.

It is best to harvest crops when the weather is dry, preferably during the later part of the day after any morning dew has evaporated.

Physical damage to the skin of produce should be avoided when harvesting, as it can diminish storage quality and lead to decay issues.

Additionally, using a sharp knife to sever the stalks of vegetables that are tough to harvest by hand minimizes accidental tearing of stem ends.

Here's a look at how best to harvest five common types of produce grown in Wisconsin.

Tomatoes: Fruits that are fully ripe and colored can be harvested for eating, juicing and canning.

gardening-autumn-harvest-produce-tomatoes.jpgTomato harvest/WxMom (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Mature tomatoes that have growth cracks on the top should be harvested when they turn partially pink, between 30 and 60 percent in color, and stored indoors at normal room temperature for about six days to reach their full hue.

Before frost strikes, mature green tomatoes should be harvested and stored indoors for ripening.

Sweet potatoes: Tubers can be harvested just before the first frost.

Beginning late August, fertilization and watering should be discontinued to stress the sweet potato vines. This process helps in translocating the starch from the vine to the tubers.

Using a garden fork to carefully uproot the sweet potatoes can minimize bruising.

Harvested sweet potatoes can be stored indoors at normal room temperature for about 2-3 weeks.

Pumpkins and winter squash: Squash fruits begin to mature from September through October.

gardening-autumn-harvest-produce-pumpkins.jpgBatwing pumpkins/WxMom (CC BY 2.0)

The fruit reach full maturity and are ready for harvesting when the outer rind becomes hard and waxy with a uniform deep solid color.

To test the firmness of the rind, fingernail pressure should be gently applied to check the resistance of the fruit.

Bell peppers: Green bell peppers are harvested when the mature fruits reach a fully grown size of about 3-4 inches long, are firm and tend to break easily from the plant.

Depending on the weather conditions in autumn, bell peppers that are other colors can take a while to develop the red, orange or yellow hues of the ripe stage.

Sweet corn: Ears should be harvested about 21 days after silky strands appear, when kernels are fully formed and milky.

Other harvest indicators for sweet corn are browning of the silks and kernels that are fully formed at the tips of ears.

Different types of produce require specific storage conditions in terms of temperature, moisture, light and ventilation.

Given appropriate practices, many crops harvested in fall can be stored for long periods while preserving their quality.

What about extra produce? Have pounds of peppers? Tons of tomatoes? Many local food banks, community gardens and other organizations accept fresh produce donations and have need for more vegetables to help people in need of nutritious and fresh food.

Vijai Pandian is a horticultural agent and educator for the University of Wisconsin-Extension Brown County. This article is adapted from an item originally published by the Green Bay Press Gazette and then published on WisContext in a partnership between Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Public Television and Cooperative Extension.

-

Previously in Wisconsin:

* Wisconsin Cheese Production Continues To Grow.

* Wisconsin's Specialty Cheesemakers May Be Better Off Than Other States.

* Tips For Growing Blueberries In Wisconsin.

* Amid A Boom, Wisconsin Cranberry Growers Look To Future Markets.

* The Top 10 Wisconsin Insect Trends Of 2016.

* Wisconsin's Penokees Are A Geologic Gem.

* Wisconsin Researchers Aim To Make Cows Happier.

* Wisconsin And The Extinction Of The Passenger Pigeon.

* The Life Of Land After Frac Sand.

* Blueberry Maggot Fly Poised To Expand In Wisconsin.

* Efforts To Boost Marten Numbers In Wisconsin Meet Ongoing Failure.

* How To Raise A Pizza.

* RECALL! Wisconsin Pork Sausage Patties.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:31 AM | Permalink

Streaks

It was a record-setting week for the White Sox. Holy Cow! Hey Hey! You can put it on the board, yes!

Let's hope a couple of years from now we're celebrating for much different reasons, like a division championship or a pennant win. At the present time we'll have to be diverted by the role the Sox played last week in helping the Cleveland Indians to four victories in their current 18-game winning streak.

For less tongue-in-cheek plaudits, how about Jose Abreu hitting for the cycle last Saturday, just the sixth player in White Sox history to do so?

But first, the Indians' inspiring string of victories have catapulted the defending American League champions to the best record in the league, surpassing the Houston Astros, who had held that distinction since Opening Day.

Cleveland hasn't lost a game since August 23. They pulled into town last Monday for a four-game set, and the closest the Sox came to ending the streak was a 5-3 decision in the opening game. The Indians outscored our fellows 30-10 before departing for home where they swept a three-game weekend series over Baltimore.

The 1935 pennant-winning Cubs won 21 in a row for the longest streak ever, and the Indians can tie that mark if they can win three more at home against Detroit beginning tonight.

As far as win streaks go, the White Sox won 11 straight in 2010 for their longest string this century. The longest winning streak in White Sox history came in 1906 - in case you forgot - when the team won 19 straight. Actually it was more of an unbeaten streak since the Sox played to a scoreless tie against the Yankees in a game that apparently ended because of darkness. Back then those games were not resumed or replayed. The Sox had won 11 in a row prior to the tie, and they went on to win the next eight games, so technically they went 20 games without a loss. They also won the pennant before beating the Cubs, who had won an astounding 116 games, in the World Series.

While it wasn't a winning streak, the Sox were on fire between June 11th and 23rd in 1961 when they reeled off 19 victories in 20 games. Of course, that was the year of Roger Maris's 61 home runs as he led the Yankees to a 109-53 record. The Sox finished in fourth place 23 games behind. Today their 86-76 record probably would earn a wild card berth in the post-season.

As lovely and wonderful as winning streaks are, they often do not portend future success. When the Sox won six straight in April to raise their record to 13-10, there were false hopes that rebuilding doesn't necessarily equal heaps of losses.

The Cubs' 21-game streak 82 years ago occurred with 23 games remaining in the regular season. The Cubbies then dropped their last two games before getting beat by Detroit in the World Series. Alas, there is no record of North Side fans flying the "L" after that letdown.

When the 2002 Oakland A's of Moneyball fame won 20 straight games in August and September, they finished the year with 35 wins in their last 43 games. They matched the Yankees' 103 wins, but couldn't beat New York in the ALCS, losing in five games.

The 2001 Mariners, winners of 116 games which tied the '06 Cubs for most all-time, reeled off 15 straight wins in the middle of the year. Their dreams also were ended by New York in the league championship series, four games to one.

The 2000 Atlanta Braves also won 15 in a row early in the season en route to winning their division with a 95-67 record. The Cardinals then bumped the Braves in three straight in the division series.

Also, consider the 1977 Kansas City Royals who trailed the South Side Hitmen for most of the year before catching fire in late August and September. The Royals of Amos Otis, Hal McRae, Freddie Patek and George Brett closed out the season by going 27-6, including a 16-game winning streak at the start of September. Meanwhile, the Sox, who trailed Kansas City by two games at the end of August, posted a 17-16 mark at season's end as the Royals raced to the postseason.

Unfortunately for the Royals, the Yankees once again lay in wait to halt Kansas City's momentum by beating Amos and George and their teammates 3-2 in the ALCS.

The one team that boasted a long winning streak, 15 games, and remained strong was the 1991 Twins, who wound up beating the Braves in the seventh game of the World Series in that memorable 1-0, 10-inning masterpiece in which Jack Morris pitched a complete game shutout.

All of this might signal that the Dodgers, losers of 10 straight and 15 of 16, very well could rebound in this season's playoffs. Just a couple of weeks ago when the team was 90-36, the pundits were predicting at least 110 wins and very possibly a challenge to the all-time record of 116. Inexplicably, they can't beat anyone right now.

However, as we've seen, many teams that went on long winning streaks and closed out the season on a roll didn't experience success when it most counted. Don't assume the Dodgers are dead.

In the meantime, the Sox' Jose Abreu is very much alive. Not since 2000, when Jose Valentin did it, had a Sox hitter recorded a cycle, and Abreu accomplished it the hard way, waiting until his final at-bat in the eighth inning to leg out a triple to the alley in right center. He homered and doubled off former Cub and Sock Jeff Samardzija in the first and third innings, respectively, before blooping a single to left off reliever Josh Osich in the seventh as the Sox pummeled the cellar-dwelling Giants 13-1.

On Sunday Abreu smacked his 30th and 31st home runs as the Sox ran roughshod over San Francisco 8-1. Abreu's top home run total was 36 in his rookie season in 2014, so he's a threat to beat that mark. And he needs 10 more RBI to reach 100, which would tie Joe DiMaggio and Albert Pujols as the only players to drive in 100 runs their first four seasons in the big leagues.

Abreu has absolutely ravaged lefthanders this season to a tune of a .380 average. His second-inning homer over the centerfield wall on Sunday came on a knee-high fastball from lefty Madison Bumgarner that might have wound up in the dirt had Abreu taken the pitch. Instead he hit it over 400 feet.

While there won't be any long winning streaks to close out this White Sox season, at least Abreu's quest for 100 RBI is reason enough to keep watching along with the development of all the young talent.

-

Former Bill Veeck bar buddy Roger Wallenstein is our White Sox correspondent. He welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:18 AM | Permalink

SportsMonday: Bears Don't Totally Suck

Opportunity blown.

But the dream is still alive. That would be the one where the Bears record five or more wins this season.

It's the dream because I said it was of course, in my preview last week. At least I said that winning five games was about as good as the Bears could hope to do in the coming campaign.

The team played well and had a great chance to win on Sunday. They failed to take advantage and in the end, the main thing people will remember was that the game was simply a 23-17 loss to the Falcons. Not a shocker.

But the Bears played considerably better than I thought they would. Also not a shocker but certainly surprising. Six or even seven wins might be possible - try to remain calm.

The best part of the weekend was when Ryan Pace signed Akiem Hicks to a four-year contract extension with a total guaranteed value of $30 million (the total value of the package is $48 mill. but the guaranteed money is what matters).

The defensive end recorded two sacks on Sunday, could have had more and is the most exciting piece of a Bear front-seven that clearly has a ton of potential.

That front seven limited Falcon quarterback Matt Ryan and his explosive offense enough that the Bears needed only to punch it in from the 5 and kick a winning extra point in the final 30 seconds.

There was a little bit of speculation about whether quarterback Mitch Trubisky could have done better finishing that drive. Perhaps the question should have been if Tarik Cohen would have been a better receiving option than Josh Bellamy or especially Jordan Howard, whose brutal drop was the worst play during the final sequence.

Cohen had more than 150 combined yards and is certainly the early favorite to be the most exciting part of the Bears offense this year - and of the special teams as well.

Hicks' contract extension was especially exciting because it moved the Bears even closer to the salary cap this season (one report over the weekend put them $12 million under before the Hicks deal).

And that is exciting to me because I had feared the primary McCaskey strategy this off-season had been a cash grab, especially when they let Alshon Jeffrey go for nothing rather than paying him about $17 million.

For a while it appeared the Bears would be way, way under the cap this season, ensuring even more monster profits than usual for ownership.

The Bears are still regretting not re-signing Jeffrey to a franchise deal when they had the chance as injuries continue to decimate their receiving corps. But general manager Ryan Pace is using the payroll flexibility that came with letting him go in great ways.

Speaking of receivers, Kevin White was no better than the Bears' fourth receiving option on Sunday, just as he had been all through the preseason. He doesn't run crisp routes, doesn't have extraordinary speed, and does not project as a major contributor in any way. He suffered an injury that may lead to his being sidelined for the season. But it barely matters. The Bears are clearly thin at receiver but Markus Wheaton is expected back soon and there are potentially other reinforcements in the wings.

All in all, the Bears gave us a little reason for hope the season won't suck. I'll take it for now.

-

See also:
* Campbell: Austin Hooper's 88-yard TD Featured A Total Breakdown By The Bears' Defense.

* Rozner: Same Questions, Bears Still Looking For Answers.

* Bernstein: Bears Display What They Are (And What They Are Not).

-

The view from Atlanta:

* Ho-Hum, Falcons Win Without All The Offensive Flash.

* Falcons' Opening Act Better Than Their Closing (But Not By Much).

* Skill, Grit And A Little Bit Of Luck.

-

NFL Highlights Video.

-

Bears Twitter

*

*

-

Falcons Twitter

*

-

Jim "Coach" Coffman welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:17 AM | Permalink

The Personal Is Now Commercial: Popular Feminism Online

Once a week, during electives at primary school in 1980, I walked with a group of girls to the local hairdressing salon where we were taught how to apply eyeshadow, lipstick and smooth foundation onto our perfect skins. We also played AFL with the boys during sports period, but the news from women's liberation about makeup and women's oppression hadn't yet arrived at my little school in the sleepy seaside town of Sorrento.

Second-wave feminism, to a large extent, defined itself against the beauty industry. As Susan Magarey writes, one of the Australian Women's Liberation movement's first actions was a 1970 protest against Adelaide University's "Miss Fresher" beauty contest. It was inspired, in part, by a protest in the U.S. against the 1968 Miss America pageant.

Women's liberationists did have their disagreements about individual choices and tactics. Anne Summers, writing in the newsletter MeJane in 1973, said she was abused for wearing makeup at a Women's Liberation conference. Carol Hanisch, a member of the New York Radical Women group behind the 1968 protest, argued later that protesters should target not the women who enter beauty contests but "the men and bosses who imposed false beauty standards on women."

In 1963, Betty Friedan had argued women's magazines were central to creating the feminine mystique, an infantilizing image of womanhood built around a myth of beautiful women in beautiful homes tending to handsome husbands and beautiful children.

friedan.jpg

By 1975, Summers agreed. In Damned Whores and God's Police, she wrote:

Popular magazines have as their principal raison d'être the codification and constant updating of femininity.

And by 1991, feminists were still linking beauty to women's oppression. Naomi Wolf's The Beauty Myth argued that women's progress in the public sphere was matched by a fashion and media industry that promoted increasingly narrow standards of physical perfection: the superwoman also had to be a supermodel.

wolf.jpg

Wolf's thesis was an important and galvanizing one, but by the 1990s popular culture was in some ways outrunning popular feminism. As an undergraduate, I nodded along with my feminist friends reading Wolf during the day, while at night we frocked up and painted our lips to visit inner-city clubs where androgyny and queer culture were increasingly visible.

Celebrity figures such as David Bowie, Prince and Madonna had prompted fans, as well as gender and cultural studies scholars, to ask if fashion and makeup could be seen in terms of play, choice and experiments around gender and sexuality, rather than inherently as oppressive.

Scholars had also started to ask whether women who consumed fashion and beauty products really were all passive dupes of big corporations. In more recent years, some have convincingly argued that beauty and fashion magazines might have been slipping feminist messages and empowering information into their pages all along.

The Women's Magazine Formula

The relationship of feminism to the beauty industry and women's magazines, in other words, has a complex history. Still, as I listened to Elaine Welteroth, the editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue, speak to the Sydney Writers' Festival in June this year, it occurred to me that today's popular feminism would be unrecognizable to many of the Miss America protesters half a century ago.

For Welteroth, an African-American former beauty editor at Teen Vogue, women's magazines and beauty products are feminism now.

"Beauty and style are just really great platforms to open up important conversations," she said.

Welteroth has been widely celebrated for commissioning stories ranging from Trump gaslighting America and abortion rights to cultural appropriation at the Coachella music festival and the difficulties of being intersex.

teenvogue.pngA recent Teen Vogue homepage.

She told her Sydney audience that fashion and beauty are portals to sisterhood and political awareness:

I can't tell you how many times I've been in the bathroom with another woman . . . we feel we have nothing in common but we talk about a great lipstick shade or great hair ... and it's just this doorway for connection and for understanding and for dialogue.

While acknowledging earlier magazines that pioneered this path, like Marie Claire, Sassy and Ms., Welteroth claimed Teen Vogue's pairing of "fashion and beauty" with "radical information" is "special and unprecedented."

On my most Pollyannaish days, I want to cheer Welteroth and other online publications that mix politics with fashion and beauty for the way they are mainstreaming feminism. In Australia, Fairfax's Daily Life blends wide-eyed articles about Miranda Kerr's wedding dress with stories about Rosie Batty and smart commentary by writers such as Ruby Hamad about the relationship between feminism and Islam.

Mia Freedman's Mamamia mixes stories about making waxing less painful with articles on reproductive rights. Freedman's websites were described as being at the epicenter of the mainstream Australian women's movement three years ago, although even then, as writer Chloe Hooper observed, Freedman had become "something of a lightning rod for contemporary feminism."

On closer inspection, though, this lashing together of feminist politics with a women's magazine sensibility has produced some odd results. In The Feminine Mystique, Friedan ridiculed a 1960s edition of the women's magazine McCall's for running articles on baldness in women; on the Duke and Duchess of Windsor; and on finding a second husband.

In 2015, when Freedman launched a new (and now defunct) site called Debrief Daily, the site included stories on why women's hair thins out, the name of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's new baby, and "Four Reasons Why Second Marriages Are Happier Marriages."

In other words, the women's magazine formula runs deep in many online publications newly rebranded as "feminist."

And as Freedman's recent and widely criticized podcast interview with feminist writer Roxane Gay suggests, the relationship between feminism and online women's magazines may be at breaking point (more on this below).

But does this mash-up of fashion and celebrity and feminism have to be incompatible? For Welteroth the answer is no; she says you can cover hard-hitting political and social issues and beauty, fashion and fame. Teen Vogue, she told us, takes news stories that "maybe needed a little bit more context for a younger audience, needed maybe a personal narrative to make [them] seem relevant to them."

It's this "making the political personal" that echoes the second-wave idea of the personal being political, albeit in a reversed way.

The Personal Is Neoliberal

In my PhD research, I've looked at the origin of the phrase "the personal is political."

Gloria Steinem once said crediting someone for coming up with it would be as absurd as assigning credit to someone for inventing the term "World War II."

Still, its first use in a publication is commonly cited as being the headline of an article by the member of New York Radical Women I mentioned earlier, Carol Hanisch, in the 1970 collection of essays Notes from the Second Year.

notesfromsecondyear.jpg

Hanisch's article was a defense of second-wave feminism's consciousness-raising. Meeting in small groups, women told stories about their lives to understand how their personal problems were actually political ones. And they planned collective action.

Women in the left and the civil rights movement felt that while they protested inequalities between black and white, and the imperialist war in Vietnam, there were glaring injustices in their personal lives. Women took the bulk of responsibility for housework and childcare, did the "shitwork" (Hanisch's word) in protest movements, were judged on their appearances, and took all the responsibility for contraception and abortion.

Second-wave feminists wanted sexual emancipation and the right to work alongside men, but they didn't want to do everything. They discussed all kinds of solutions, from communal living to state-provided free childcare, to a total revolution in the consumerist capitalist system.

The jarring thing about the feminism of sites such as Daily Life or Mamamia is that they seem to want to make women responsible for doing everything again. Take a look at the sections at the top of a magazine's website and you'll see a list of topics such as "relationships," "health," "beauty," "careers," and so on.

dailylife.pngA recent Daily Life homepage.

The endless articles and lists of ways to improve and excel in all those areas can make these sites exhausting just to look at. It seems no coincidence that the same sites will carry articles about managing anxiety, or "10 Ways To Cope With Your Depression," and, most famously, Freedman's own tale of using Lexapro to cope with anxiety, a drug she endorsed to readers.

Many second-wavers were influenced by the counter-culture and, with their radical therapy groups and interest in personal growth, they were also interested in self-care. And medication, of course, can be life-saving. But when second-wave feminists like Friedan saw large numbers of women who were anxious and using anti-depressants, they asked how the world needed to change. Or as Hanisch said in 1970:

There are no personal solutions at this time. There is only collective action for a collective solution.

Reflecting on her original article in 2006, Hanisch did acknowledge that we can change ourselves at the same time we change the world. But now websites like Mamamia are increasingly asking how women can transform and adapt themselves to fit into a competitive, individualistic world. The emphasis is mostly on individual achievement and adaption to the status quo - rather than on changing the status quo.

The Political Becomes Personal

The use of first-person stories on women's websites like Daily Life and Mamamia exploded around the same time as media budgets were cut (a trend writer Jia Tolentino has written about in the U.S.). They have been immensely popular, as researcher Kate Wilcox found in her study of the Daily Life website.

At their best, these contemporary personal stories are a new form of feminist consciousness-raising, helping women to realize they aren't alone and to understand that their experiences have social and political contexts. Some great writers with extraordinary stories, such as Mamamia's Rosie Waterland, emerged from this process.

At their worst, today's personal story trend never gets beyond the personal to be political, focusing instead on the scandalous, the trivial or sensational, as Roxane Gay recently found.

roxanegay.jpg

Gay is an accomplished writer and academic who makes the personal political in her latest book Hunger.

She places the story of her body in the context of her past traumatic sexual abuse. She writes that her body has been pathologized by the medical profession, by the media (singling out shows such as The Biggest Loser) and by people who treat her as an object to be feared and commented on, rather than as a person with opinions and feelings.

Freedman's interview with Gay was not terrible, but it wasn't very enlightening either. It mostly glided over big political questions. Instead she asked Gay to repeat a series of stories - about her experiences on planes, her relationship with her parents and where Gay sources her clothes.

Freedman's most egregious mistake, however, was to introduce her podcast by going into minute (and questionable) detail about Gay's access requirements. Freedman revealed discussions with Gay's publicists about lifts, stairs and chairs: reducing Gay to a freaky body that doesn't belong in the world - the very thing her book asks people not to do.

Feminist books, magazines and now websites have allowed consciousness-raising to move out of small intimate groups, opening up a proliferation of stories for women to read anywhere at any time. Observing the U.S. scene, Tolentino says the personal essay trend is all but over.

But books marketed as popular feminist texts have been (and remain) increasingly personal and memoir-based. Often now written by women who are celebrities (Lena Dunham, Sheryl Sandberg, Caitlin Moran . . . ), their life story becomes both the example and proof of the author's feminist credentials.

The very personal tone in which popular feminism is conducted today can be traced back to both second-wave consciousness-raising and the confessional column of women's magazines. Although Gay is an academic and cultural commentator as well as a feminist celebrity, as the Mamamia interview debacle showed, these two traditions can collide, creating a new set of problems where the political can become unhelpfully personal.

I'm not suggesting we give Freedman, a publisher who made her name as the youngest editor of Australian Cosmopolitan, a free pass. I am suggesting, though, that we shouldn't have been surprised by the way this story turned out.

Freedman apologized to Gay almost as soon as her interview was published, but her No Filter personal podcast thrives, with Freedman recently tweeting it has reached 4 million downloads.

Selling Consciousness-Raising

With their roots in the new left and anti-capitalist counter-culture, it's not surprising many early women's liberationists opposed the beauty industry and the commodification of women's bodies. They weren't against sex (who is?), but rather the "commercial exploitation of sex," as an early Sydney women's liberation group told Julie Rigg in a 1969 interview with The Australian.

Now, on Welteroth's Teen Vogue, articles about make-up and hairstyles, or a bathing suit brand worn by model Bella Hadid, jostle with serious stories about cinematic representations of eating disorders.

And while Mamamia will run body-positive stories, it's often tied to products you can buy, like active wear and tights for larger women.

Welteroth and Teen Vogue haven't been described as "woke" without good reason. And they are challenging publishers and the broader community's preconceptions about what young readers are interested in.

But the site is still bound to the genre's code of presenting attractive bodies and aspirational lives. So it will run a critical article about cultural appropriation at Coachella music festival and illustrate it with Instagram images of stunning models and a Jenner family member wearing an American headdress.

On the face of it, it was encouraging when Welteroth told her Sydney audience her plans for Teen Vogue include bringing young girls together "IRL" to "actually have conversations around the table where they can have their voices heard and work together to try to now solve some of these problems in the world we talk about."

This is consciousness-raising version 2.0, branded Vogue™. It has to be a good thing for a struggling and isolated teen to read about a celebrity coming out, or coping with depression, or the mechanics of safe anal sex.

But I find it hard to celebrate what is also, in many ways, a major corporation effectively "selling your politics" back to you, as one friend recently put it.

I'm not the target audience. And I don't think it would be terrible if those Vogue-convened consciousness-raising sessions came with a gift pack of a rainbow tattoo for Pride Week, a T-shirt with a Black Lives Matter-endorsed fist logo, and even purple eyeshadow for feminism. But I can't help feeling like I'm back in primary school, being marched down to the beauty professionals to learn how to be a woman.

Kath Kenny is a doctoral candidate at Macquarie University. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

-

Comments welcome.

The Conversation

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 12:00 AM | Permalink

September 10, 2017

The Chicago Tribune Presents Oprah's Boyfriend's Identity Seminar

The Chicago Tribune presents Stedman Graham's Identity Seminar in Naperville on September 28th, from 6:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. at the Wentz Concert Hall at the Fine Arts Center at North Central College.

Identity is the foundation for thinking and growing. It is the cornerstone of social and economic development. Today, the evidence is everywhere. In no other time in history has there been a greater need for people to be leaders of their lives and claim their right as human beings, which includes the freedom to achieve their full potential.

"We live in a time demanding self-development, self-mastery and self-actualization," Stedman Graham says. "In the 21st century, you have the potential to create your life and be whoever you decide to be. You must realize that your potential as a human being is not based on how the world defines you, but how you define yourself. Through education, hard work and purpose, you can start to develop, evolve and create the opportunities that define and determine your identity and your future."

Your success is based on your willingness to be a leader of your own life. As self-leaders, knowing who we are and being clear about our identity are necessary to navigate our lives.

It is critical that we learn how to adapt without losing our sense of who we are. The key is to know ourselves.

Now more than any other time, we as leaders need to be self-learners who are responsible for our work and accountable to the organizations, families or communities we serve.

People who are secure in their identity can see beyond obstacles and take full advantage of the extraordinary opportunities that present themselves.

The Identity Seminar offers the opportunity to empower yourself and develop your potential no matter your nationality, race, religion, gender or other labels encountered.

With a strong sense of Identity you will:

  • Have clarity to recognize what is important in your life.
  • Define, plan, and prepare with a purpose and direction.
  • Build self-leadership skills.
  • Become aware of the barriers to your potential.
  • Improve performance and productivity.
  • Become a self-directed learner.

Those who lead, who are employed by or who are patrons of business, are the drivers of economies. They are the engine that affects family, finances, community and culture.

Now is the time for leadership, change, improvement, growth and accepting new challenges as they continue to emerge.

The differentiator is whether you, your workforce, your constituents or your customers are prepared with the skills and the mindset to do so.

Register for the September 28, 2017, by calling 312.755.8170 or visit http://bit.ly/2j9MexQ.

About Stedman Graham
Stedman Graham is chairman and CEO of S. Graham & Associates, a management and marketing consulting company that specializes in the corporate and educational markets.

As an entrepreneur, author and educator, Graham lectures and conducts seminars for businesses and organizations around the country.

He has written 11 books including two New York Times Best Sellers and a Wall Street Journal bestseller.

Identity Leadership content is driven by his proprietary Nine-Step Success Process™.

Clients have included Gulfstream Aerospace, General Dynamics, the Indiana Pacers, the Minnesota Vikings, Key Bank, Deloitte, CVS Pharmacy, AARP and various high schools, colleges and military bases across the nation and internationally.

-

Previously in Stedman Graham:
* Our Favorite Oprah Moments.

* Oprah's Other Secrets.

* Inside Oprah's Auction.

* 20 Tweets: Stedman Graham.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 6:46 AM | Permalink

Wrongfully Convicted Man: Illinois Supreme Court Should Hear Civil Case

The Roderick and Solange MacArthur Justice Center has filed a petition asking the Illinois Supreme Court to hear the civil rights case brought by Alan Beaman, who served 13 years in prison after being falsely convicted of murder.

In 2008, Beaman was more than a dozen years into a 50-year sentence for the 1993 murder of Jennifer Lockmiller when the Illinois Supreme Court unanimously reversed the conviction and the State's Attorney dropped all charges. Mr. Beaman subsequently received a certificate of innocence and official pardon from the Governor. Beaman is now asking the Illinois Supreme Court for the opportunity to move forward with his civil suit.

"Alan Beaman spent his youth behind bars for a crime he could not have committed," said Locke Bowman, executive director of the MacArthur Justice Center. "Mr. Beaman deserves his day in court, before a jury, to seek justice from the men who conducted a dishonest and blatantly biased investigation that robbed him of his youth."

The case alleges that from the first day of the investigation into Ms. Lockmiller's murder, the defendants labeled Beaman the "primary suspect" despite no concrete evidence tying him to the crime and significant evidence of other, more likely, suspects.

Beaman asserts that investigators ignored or pushed aside other possible suspects, including a man who was in an on-off relationship with the victim and, unlike Beaman, had motive, opportunity and a violent history towards women.

When this man was brought in for questioning, he failed to comply with the polygrapher when asked if he was the killer. The polygraph report went missing; it was never given to the prosecutor or defense.

"Without the completely baseless, biased investigation conducted by the defendants, Mr. Beaman would not have been indicted, tried and convicted," said Bowman. "All he is seeking now is an opportunity for a jury to hear the truth."

The Illinois Supreme Court filing argues that the case has important implications for holding police accountable when they cause wrongful convictions.

"The Supreme Court should hear this case because it is profoundly important not only for Mr. Beaman but for all wrongfully convicted people in a state notorious for jaundiced investigations and wrongful convictions," said David Shapiro, appellate director of the MacArthur Justice Center.

Malicious prosecution claims have become a cornerstone of police misconduct litigation. In 2016, Illinois ranked second among all states for wrongful convictions that resulted in exonerations. The Court's ruling could provide important guidance to lower courts about when police officers should be held liable for wrongful convictions.

Beaman has repeatedly sought to bring forth his civil suit since his exoneration.

He originally brought forth a lawsuit in federal court, which ruled in favor to the defendants on Beaman's federal law claims.

Beaman's current action originated in the Circuit Court of McLean County in April 2014, which rejected the state law claims. The complaint names the Town of Normal, Illinois and three of its former police officers as defendants.

-

See also: Jim Dey: Monetary Damages Elusive For Wrongly Convicted Man.

-

And: The Wrongful Conviction Of Alan Beaman:

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 5:52 AM | Permalink

September 8, 2017

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Nots at the Empty Bottle on Tuesday night.


-

2. Brockhampton at Bottom Lounge on Wednesday night.

-

3. Deep Purple in Tinley Park on Wednesday night.

-

4. Alice Cooper in Tinley Park on Wednesday night.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 11:04 PM | Permalink

The [Friday] Papers

For completists, there was no column on Thursday.

Pilsen.

#streetart #chicago #pilsen

A post shared by Rebecca Lind (@chitownmuggle) on

-

Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's
Red light district.

-

Recovery Month
"Sometimes it is easy to see what alcohol is doing to the drinker. It may be more difficult to see what it is doing to the rest of the family."

-

The Undocumented Vs. Our "Best" Corporations
Guess who pays more in taxes?

-

CTE Season Preview!
What you need to know.

-

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #168: Johnny Foxhole's Brutal Bears
Blowouts begin Sunday. Plus: CTE Season Preview; Johnny Foxhole; The No Fun League Loosens Up; Confounding Cubs; Something About The White Sox; and Schweinsteiger!

-

The Week In Chicago Rock
Is in pre-production.

-

BeachBook
A sampling.

The Hollow Courage Of Bill Maher.

*

Bears Don't Own The Rights To 'Go Bears' And 'Bear Down.'

*

Beer Glasses Light Up After NFL Touchdowns.

*

When The Rich Said No To Getting Richer.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

*

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Slide in.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 7:18 PM | Permalink

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #168: Johnny Foxhole's Brutal Bears

Blowouts begin. Plus: CTE Season Preview; Johnny Foxhole; The No Fun League Loosens Up; Confounding Cubs; Something About The White Sox; and Schweinsteiger!


-

SHOW NOTES

* 168.

:38: Establishing The Bears' Bullshit.

* A new defensive metric.

* Ryan's roster.

* Bears Roster Analysis: Not Enough Difference-Makers.

* Jacquizz Rodgers is the other guy I was thinking of!

* Wiederer: Is It Win Or Else For Bears Coach John Fox In 2017?

* Pissy Virginia.

* Offensive line not so offensive?

* Chicago's WRs: Worst Receivers.

* Nonsense On Stilts.

35:44: CTE Season Preview!

36:15: Johnny Foxhole.

* AND RYAN PACE.

40:20: The No Fun League Tries To Loosen Up.

* Rhodes: "Enjoy has the word joy in it!"

46:49: Confounding Cubs.

* Playoff-bound but not totally sound.

* It's gonna be all about the bullpen, people.

58:31: Something About The White Sox.

58:51: Schweinsteiger!

-

STOPPAGE: :48

-

For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 3:26 PM | Permalink

CTE Season Preview

"Researchers are tackling fresh questions about a degenerative brain disease now that it has been detected in the brains of nearly 200 football players after death. As a new NFL season gets underway, here's a look at what's known about CTE."


-

Plus, Comment of the Week:

-

Previously in concussions:
* Bob Probert's Broken Brain.

* NFL Players Killing Themselves Because They Miss Football So Much.

* The College Football Report: Dementia Pugilistica.

* Blackhawks Playing Head Games.

* Jay Cutler Should Consider Retiring.

* Dislike: Friday Night Tykes.

* Hurt And Be Hurt: The Lessons Of Youth Sports.

* Chicago Soccer Player Patrick Grange Had CTE.

* Sony Softened Concussion To Placate NFL.

* Ultra-Realistic Madden To Simulate Game's Debilitating Concussions.

* Dear Football: I'm Breaking Up With You.

* Dead College Football Player's Brain Leaves Clues Of Concussions' Toll On Brain.

* More Bad Concussion News For Young Football Players.

* NFL Tried To Fix Concussion Study.

* The Week In Concussions: Another Enforcer Down.

* Teen Concussion Rate Rising Significantly.

* Conflict Of Interest For NFL Doctors To Report To Teams: Harvard Study.

* U.S. Supreme Court Ends Fight Over $1 Billion NFL Concussion Deal.

* U.S. High School Soccer Concussions On The Rise.

* Youth Football Finally Listening To Coach Coffman.

* Many Kids Still Don't Report Concussion Symptoms. How Can We Change That?

* Brain Damage In Former Players Fuels Soccer 'Heading' Fears.

* Canadian Youth Hockey Injuries Cut In Half After National Policy Change.

* More Teen Knowledge About Concussion May Not Increase Reporting.

* High School Boys Fear Looking 'Weak' If They Report Concussions.

* Pro Flag Football Is Now A Thing - Starring Former NFL Players!

* Nearly All Donated NFL Brains Found To Have CTE.

* Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions.

* Whoa. Perhaps The Smartest Player In NFL History - He's In Math PhD Program At MIT - Assesses Situation And Decides To Save His Brain.

* Study: CTE Affects Football Players At All Levels.

* Dan Jiggetts Is Right About CTE.

* Letting Our Boys Onto The Football Field Is A Losing Play.

* Tackle Rings?

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:43 AM | Permalink

Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's

Red light district.

mariesoct15bw.jpg(ENLARGE FOR PROPER VIEWING)

-

More Chicago photography from Helene Smith.

-

Helene on Twitter!

-

Meet Helene!

-

Stationery, iPhone cases, hoodies.

-

Listen to Helene talk about Photo Booth; starts at 57:54.

-

Previously:
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Man Grilling
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Yum Yum Donuts
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Father's Day
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vintage Airmaster
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Time
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Shade
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Illinois Slayer
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Fire Escape
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Nugget
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hollywood, Chicago
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flag Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Van In Flames.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fluid Power Automation.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Corn Dog.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop The Killing Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Backyard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A to Z Things.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Swedish Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Rothschild Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Silos.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Wires.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Orange Garden.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Irving Park Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Pigeons.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Lanagan's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: For Rent.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Pizza & Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mori Milk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Breakfast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Chicago Christmas Postcard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Harold's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Family Fun.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snow Bike.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nativity Scene.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Warsaw.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deluxe Cleaners.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Golden Cue.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Die Another Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sears Key Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jeri's Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Barry's Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Liberty.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Kitchen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Specials.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Won The Cup.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartender Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Plane Blues.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Finest Quality.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Family Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Girls Wanted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skokie Savanna.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Signpost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Man And The Tree.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Street Fleet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Citgo Story.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fantasy Hair Design.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Garage.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Clark Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pole Position.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Geometry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Found Love.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fill In The Blank.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vacuums Of The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dumpster Still Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wagon Master.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Intersecting West Rogers Park.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Antiques.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cow Patrol.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Backstage Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skully Bungalow.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Francisco Frankenstein.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Long Cool Heat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Smokers' Mast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Big Fat Phone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Happy Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alley Men.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Show!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You've Got Mailbox.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Broken Window Theory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dali Logan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Svengoolie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Horner Park Hot Dogs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cubs Rehab.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 20th Century Schizoid Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Men On Vans.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Is Done.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snowy Lincoln.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Waiting Room.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Avondale Chicken.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Winter's End.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Friendly Skies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boyhood Buzzer Beater.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: J Date.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: International Window Lady.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shanghai Inn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Open For Business.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Andersonville Unplugged.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 3-Flat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Turkey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicagolandia.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Eat At Odge's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deitch Pharmacy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sud-Z Bubble.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bands Wanted!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Belmont Tavern.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Superheroic San Luis Freeze.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Oasis.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lyndale Food & Jewelry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Book Window.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alco Dude.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ballin Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Worry, Be Cookie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Four Trey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Office.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America From Inside The Golden Nugget In Ravenswood.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cellphone Repair.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boots 'N' Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunrise Strip.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: At The Corner Of Glad And Happy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Uptown Autumn Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mid-Century Modern Halloween.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Autumn Station Wagon.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Betty's & Nick's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ohio House Impact.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: End School Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Portage Park Peek-A-Boo.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: South Side Sundown.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Susie's Drive-Thru.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Ham.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Food & Liquor, Milhouse.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Hare Blue Line Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Schwing!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ad Deluxe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jesus At The Drive-In.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Tanks Of Avondale.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Conveyance Belt.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Esquire In The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nick's Meat Market.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Keep Havin A Good Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Knock Knock.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Man At Marie's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonneville.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Logan Bags.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Stairwell.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Velvet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Court Is In Session.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: DLER ALKY.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Railyards Rush Hour.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop Killing People.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 1.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Greystone Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You Are Beautiful.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Auto Part Overlords.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bearground.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 2.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skyway Sculpture.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Dome Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hello, St. Joe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Revolution Books.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Driveway.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Proceed To Checkout.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Summer Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Daily Double.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Are Moving.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 3.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunny Day Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ashland & Pawn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Party Store.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Donuts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: AAA Sales.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Rule.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Butcher Boy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Endorsement.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: I Voted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pink(ish) Cadillac.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stuffed With Sadness.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Air.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Economy Heating.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Season's Greetings.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Housemates.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Have Fresh Goat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartcam.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gaslight.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Urban Wheat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Embassy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln's Cozy Corner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Glory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bowling Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Red Lion, Red Hots.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Sitting.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Jukebox Is Not A Democracy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Descending Darkly.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Handicapped Milk Jug Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gumball Express.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicken Run.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wyoming, Michigan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bus Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Manzana.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Look Back.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mail Call.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gas Pump No. 8.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Photo Shoot.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flotos' Gifts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shelf Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: S&M Carpets.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Elvis At The Golden Nugget.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wunder's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Daisies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Supply Line.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sal's Barber Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Classy Oogle Queen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cloudy Gate.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cherry Pie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lannings' Crossing.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 8:47 AM | Permalink

September 7, 2017

The Undocumented Vs. Our "Best" Corporations

While President Trump demonizes undocumented workers and preys on their children, and GOP politicians try to sell the country on the absurd idea that tax cuts for rich people and corporations help regular people, the Patriotic Millionaires think it is worth pointing out that our undocumented fellow residents pay far more in federal taxes than many of our "best" corporations.

To wit:

pm1.jpg

*

pm2.jpg

*

pm3.jpg

*

pm4.jpg

-

Previously by The Patriotic Millionaires:

* Patriotic Millionaires vs. Carried Interest.

* Tax Day | Patriotic Millionaires Available For Comment.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 4:54 PM | Permalink

Recovery Month

September National Recovery Month includes opportunities for families and friends of alcoholics to find help and hope in Chicago area Al-Anon Family Groups.

"Sometimes it is easy to see what alcohol is doing to the drinker," Al-Anon communications specialist Mona Dougherty said. "It may be more difficult to see what it is doing to the rest of the family."

Mary Kay Clarke, Addictions Center Manager for Linden Oaks Behavioral Center at Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights, said, "We don't just look at the patient alone. When we're treating an alcoholic or an addict, we're not just dealing with one person. We're dealing with the entire family, because family members get to a point of hopelessness and helplessness. They don't know what to do, and they don't feel confident enough to make important decisions until they try Al-Anon.

"Family members don't know there are other people out there like them, so they feel isolated. After they attend Al-Anon meetings, there's a sense of palpable relief. They become calm and relaxed, because they've been around people who have been through what they are going through. They learn how to detach with love. They get to the point of saying I still love you, but I'm not going to allow this to go on in our home anymore. Al‑Anon is a great support system for them."

An anonymous Al-Anon member was married for three years before alcoholism came between her and her husband at the expense of their marriage. She said, "I made all the mistakes in the book, like pleading, nagging, threatening, bargaining, crying and trying to fix everything. I compromised and humiliated myself in the process. I knew in my heart the relationship was doomed, but he was a loving and funny and amazing man while sober, so I told myself those moments were worth the pain. And I told myself the biggest lie of all. When he was drinking, I told myself at least I've got a man, and I'm not alone. Al-Anon has been the biggest blessing to me. I'm much more confident and I worry less and less about things that used to eat me up inside."

Al-Anon Family Groups are for families and friends who have been affected by a loved one's drinking. In Chicago, 82 Al-Anon Family Groups meet every week. Nearly 16,000 groups meet weekly throughout the U.S., Canada, Bermuda, and Puerto Rico. Al-Anon Family Groups meet in more than 130 countries, and Al-Anon literature is available in more than 40 languages.

For more information about Al-Anon Family Groups - or Alateen for young people - go to al-anon.org to view a copy of "Al-Anon Faces Alcoholism 2018" or to listen to a "First Steps to Al-Anon Recovery" podcast. To find a local meeting, call toll-free: 1-888-4AL-ANON.

-

See also:

* Chicago Recovery Walk & Olympics.

* Orland Park Substance Awareness Forum Hosts Free Movie Night On Sept. 27.

* Chicago Artist Turning Used Drug Bags Into Art For National Recovery Month.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:32 AM | Permalink

September 6, 2017

The [Wednesday] Papers

"This month in the gumball machine: poems from the watery depths."

-

THIS IS BIG

People! 37 Years Of Court Data! Unprecedented! Let's Make This Happen!

-

The Chicago Architectural Biennial: Names To Know!

-

Crain's Editorial: Providing Salary History Should Be History.

-

Beneath Chicago Lies An Entire Second City Of Ants.

-

Jet Ski Racing This Weekend.

-

Hurricane Cats Arrive At Chicago Shelter.

-

'Zombie Dogs" Roaming Near Chicago Are Infected Coyotes, Police Warn.

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Daily.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:02 AM | Permalink

September 5, 2017

The [Tuesday] Papers

The famous Minnesota State Fair Pronto Pup - with mustard and ketchup if that's what makes you happy.

Continuing with the classics, this Pronto Pup! What a work of art. ✨

A post shared by Minnesota State Fair - Food (@mnstatefairfood) on

-

Beachwood Photo Booth: Lannings' Crossing
A Grand Rapids intersection.

-

Coffman: The Coming Bears Fiasco
"The problem is it is most probable the Bears will be below average at running back, receiver, quarterback, offensive line, defensive line, linebackers, safeties and cornerbacks, especially in the event of just one injury."

-

Beachwood Sports Radio: A Clusterbomb Of Ridiculousness
The Bears are who we told you they were. Plus: 'The Cubs Are Ready To Go'; Concussion Report; Rick Hahn's Best Season; and The Fire Go Up In Smoke.

-

The White Sox Report: Colon & The Kids
Were they watching?

-

If Corporations Paid Their Fair Share . . .
. . . We could have free higher ed, universal healthcare, & decent infrastructure. Or we could keep giving corporations tax breaks.

-

The Weekend In Chicago Rock
Is in production.

-

BeachBook

Jeff Sessions Lied About Military Gear For Local Police.

*

Water Clarity Is A Murky Matter In The Great Lakes.

*

Coast Guard Shuts Down Illegal Charter Boats In Chicago Area.

-

TweetWood
A sampling.

*

*

-

The Beachwood Tronc Line: Drop dead.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 11:48 AM | Permalink

SportsMondayTuesday: The Coming Bears Fiasco

The time has come to make a Bears prediction. The time has also come to acknowledge it is an impossible task. And not because of the excuse others will use, the one having to do with multiple major potential contributors seemingly not having made it all the way back from injuries and therefore questionable for the season.

My primary dilemma is, who knows whether this team will win two or maybe even three games? Heck, perhaps everything will go right and they'll get five glorious victories. I fear I won't be able to determine whether 2-14, 3-13 or good golly Miss Molly 4-12 will be the way to go (I have to narrow it down somehow and five wins is obviously the least likely). But by the end of the column I vow there will be closure.

What's that you say? You just want to know if this team has even a tiny chance to be good? Well, in order for an expert prognosticator like myself to rationally predict success, I need to conclude that the Bears will be better than average in a majority of position groups.

The problem is it is most probable the Bears will be below average at running back, receiver, quarterback, offensive line, defensive line, linebackers, safeties and cornerbacks, especially in the event of just one injury. And despite all the Bears apologists gearing up to again give this organization a pass because of ill health, that is no longer acceptable in today's NFL.

It is way past time for observers to acknowledge that the new normal in this fearsome sport is many injuries per team per season. In a game this fast and this violent, that is the way it is going to be for the foreseeable future. Good teams find ways to overcome. Bad teams, like the miserable Bears, use it as an excuse. It was lame last year. It will be pathetic this year.

Oh, and the strength of schedule. Many are already giving the Bears another excuse due to the perceived difficult slate of opponents they face. Shockingly enough this supposed adversity is overblown as well.

Beside the two games each against division rivals - you know, the basic element of a schedule that every team faces - the Bears spend half their schedule taking on the teams from the mediocre NFC South and the even more mediocre AFC North.

It is rough to open against the Falcons from that first group of course, but no one else in their division finished above .500 last season. The Steelers lead the latter group and they will almost certainly field a great offense again. But who is afraid of their defense? The Ravens and Bengals are mired in mediocrity. And the Browns?

In order to have success, the Bears will have to play decently against those teams and have success in their division. That would be exactly what all the other teams in the NFL will have to do.

And yes, yes, I myself wrote just a week ago that the early sked was brutal. That was during the preseason, OK? I'm grasping at straws during all preseasons to give a local team a break. That crap comes to an end once the regular season is upon us.

Let's get back to the groups.

The Bears go into this season with one every-down back on the roster. One? How can anyone think that Jordan Howard and third-down backs and a special teams guy is the way to go? Unbelievable. The running back is the guy most likely to get hurt by the way, if somehow that wasn't already clear.

The team already suffered the prominent injury to the wide receivers group when Cam Meredith went down. And the problem of course is that that group was already terrible to begin with. No team in the NFL goes into the season with a weaker group of wide receivers than the Bears. Kendall Wright is competent in the slot. And that is it.

And so we come to quarterback Mike Glennon. The guy showed some real promise in the third exhibition game, you know, the one that is slightly more meaningful than completely meaningless? But who the hell is he going to throw to now that Meredith is out for the year?

The Bears seem to have no clue who will start in the middle of the offensive line. Tackles Bobby Massie and Charles Leno, guards Josh Sitton and Cody Whitehair, and center Hroniss Grasu showed real promise during the preseason. Then the Bears practiced with Whitehair at center for most of last week, disrupting both the center and guard positions. I just don't understand.

As for the defense, linemen Akiem Hicks, Eddie Goldman and Jonathan Bullard have a chance to be good. They have an even better chance to be injury-prone and the backups are not inspiring. At linebacker, Danny Trevathan is supposed to start in the middle and he has not practiced once in the preseason. On the outside, Leonard Floyd had two serious concussions last year. Look out if he gets another one this time around.

The best cornerback, Prince Amukamara, has an ankle injury. More importantly, he can't catch (no interceptions last year). The starting safeties are a castoff (Quinton Demps) and a rookie (Eddie Jackson).

The Bears' tight ends, starting with Dion Sims and Zach Miller, will be above average if they stay healthy. It is a miracle. The rookie who is supposed to provide depth at the position, Adam Shaheen, looks like a bust.

Throughout the preseason, we've heard about how much the Bears have improved their depth. What. A. Crock. At cornerback, the Bears primary backup is Kyle Fuller. Remember that at the end of last year, defensive coordinator Vic Fangio wanted nothing more than to dump Fuller. In a shockingly candid moment, he put it out there that Fuller simply wasn't tough enough to make it in the NFL. But there he is, ready to start if Amukamara can't go.

The Bears will be lucky to finish 3-13. Then they will be in the running for a top draft pick and it looks like there will be some great quarterbacks available. The one thing they won't need is a quarterback. Perfect.

-

Jim "Coach" Coffman welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:22 AM | Permalink

Colon & The Kids

He's a rotund, cuddly teddy bear out there on the mound, the kind of guy who should have his own rocking chair in the dugout. Perhaps the bat boy should bring him slippers and a pipe between innings.

At age 44, Bartolo Colon just keeps on throwing strikes, like he did last Thursday as his Twins trimmed the White Sox 5-4 to complete a three-game sweep of the South Siders. Leaving after six innings of work with the scored tied at 3, Colon kept his team in the game despite giving up 10 hits, not an unusual occurrence for the 20-year veteran who clearly loves to pitch and compete.

Steve Stone reminded viewers time and again that Colon throws his fastball more than 80 percent of the time. Early in his career, the Dominican righthander's heater was consistently in the mid-90s, and he reached 92 last week.

But that's not the story. Pinpoint control is. Colon rarely walks anyone. He's issued 10 passes in 55 innings for the Twins this season. Against the White Sox, he didn't walk anyone. If a fastball under the hitter's hands is called for, Colon is your man. If an opponent tends to swing at pitches in his eyes, Colon is more than willing to cooperate.

Colon appeared to be finished in 2009 when he was a member of the White Sox. Ineffectiveness and arm woes sent him to the DL, and he actually disappeared in July. Then-manager Ozzie Guillen confessed that he didn't know the whereabouts of his pitcher. Colon was inactive the entire 2010 season before making a comeback with the Yankees in 2011 when he was 38.

When the great Cuban pitcher Luis Tiant rebounded similarly in the early '70s, Harry Caray commented, "You coulda had this guy for a ham sandwich," as Tiant went on to win 146 games after a disastrous 1970 season in Boston when he won just one game.

It might have taken some cheese added to the ham to sign Colon seven years ago after he underwent stem cell treatments in the Dominican Republic for elbow and shoulder injuries. Dr. Joseph Purita, who got his medical training at Georgetown, used Colon's own stem cells from his bone marrow and fat, of which he had plenty. Injecting those cells into Colon's torn rotator cuff apparently did wonders.

"This is not hocus pocus," Dr. Purita told the New York Times, consistently denying that human growth hormone had anything to do with Colon's miraculous recovery. The big guy did lose 50 games to suspension in 2012 for synthetic testosterone, but who can be sure that this had anything to do with his desire to dominate opposing batters. It all makes for a storybook tale.

We assume that young Sox pitchers like Lucas Giolito, Carlos Rodon and Reynaldo Lopez were watching closely last Thursday. All are capable of throwing hard and striking people out. Yet Colon, using an assortment of dancing fastballs, fanned eight in his six innings against the Sox while displaying his unflappable manner with runners on base.

Sox pitchers this season have walked 530 batters, more than any other staff in baseball. Last week, while losing four of six games, they put 23 runners on base via the walk. Seven of those scored. Consider that the Sox dropped 6-4 and 5-4 decisions to Minnesota and a 3-1 decision on Friday against Tampa Bay, and you might have the answer to why Ricky Renteria's ballclub is no closer to .500 than 27 games.

Sure, this is a rebuilding team, but you still have every reason to believe that big league pitchers have to ability to throw strikes. As silly and simple as it sounds, there is no defense for bases on balls. The batter always gets on base. Is it too much to expect that anyone whose talent propels them to the major league level would have the ability to get the ball over the plate? Apparently, that is a false assumption.

Historically there have been other pitchers who enjoyed longevity because of their command of the strike zone. Jamie Moyer gave up more home runs (522) than anyone in history, yet he pitched for 25 seasons, retiring at age 49 in 2012 with 269 wins. Key to his success were the 2.6 walks per nine innings that Moyer accounted for.

The next four pitchers in home runs allowed - Robin Roberts, Phil Niekro, Fergie Jenkins, and Don Sutton - are all in the Hall of Fame, and none walked more than three batters per nine innings. Furthermore, all pitched at least 19 years in the big leagues. Roberts retired when he was 39, the youngest of the quartet to do so. Knuckleballer Niekro pitched until he was 48.

Fans love the old guys who rely on guile and cunning to befuddle hitters. Greg Maddux's 23 years, 355 wins, 3.16 ERA, and, lest we be remiss, the 1.6 walks per nine innings are mind-numbing milestones that are so much more meaningful and important than today's soup de jour of exit velocity, 100 mph hummers, and tape measure dingers.

However, we may have seen the last of the 40-year-olds who continue to be effective due to their ability to hit spots and fool hitters. Today's top pitchers like Chris Sale, Clayton Kershaw, Corey Kluber and Zach Greinke have not been called upon, as yet, to cajole and nudge hitters with an array of laser-directed fastballs, off-speed offerings, with maybe a knuckler or two mixed in.

No pitcher in baseball history has a better strikeout-to-walk ratio than ex-Sox Sale, whose 5.11 mark is markedly better than the runner-up, a guy named Tommy Bond whose last pitch was thrown in 1882. Sale is just 28. If he keeps this up for the next dozen years, throwing as hard as he does, he'll be one of the greatest of all-time. We'll see, but his style is nothing like the vast majority of the pitchers who have enjoyed notable longevity.

While on the topic of pitching, Chicago was the scene of a rare phenomenon on Sunday. Last week I noted that White Sox prospect Lucas Giolito was a product of the Harvard-Westlake School, the tony private school in Los Angeles. He and prep teammate Max Fried both were first-round draft choices in 2012.

As fate would have it, both were starting pitchers Sunday 70 blocks apart in Chicago. Giolito took the mound for the Sox while Fried, pitching for Atlanta, faced the Cubs at Wrigley. Both allowed a single run - Giolito over seven innings and Fried over five - earning victories, the first for Fried and the second for Giolito. I'm not sure if the saber guys keep tabs on events like this, but I'd bet two high school teammates have never been starting and winning pitchers the same afternoon in the same city where one of them (Fried) was making his first-ever big league start.

Giolito was magnificent. The lone blemish was a solo home run off the bat of Lucas Duda. Giolito fanned 10 and - you knew this was coming - he walked just one hitter. Who knows? He might have been paying special attention to Colon last Thursday.

Joining Giolito on the mound last week for the White Sox were young prospects Carlos Rodon, Carson Fulmer and Reynaldo Lopez. The foursome accounted for 19 innings pitched, allowing just 11 hits, six walks and 23 strikeouts. Their combined ERA was 2.84, and Fulmer got his first major league win on Saturday in a rain-delayed 5-4 win over the Rays.

With 27 games remaining on the schedule, the opportunity to observe the progression of the Sox' young pitchers is enough to keep our interest. Now if they just keep throwing strikes.

-

Former Bill Veeck bar buddy Roger Wallenstein is our White Sox correspondent. He welcomes your comments.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:02 AM | Permalink

September 4, 2017

The Weekend In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Blake at Quenchers on Friday night.


-

2. Ween at the North Coast Music Festival in Union Park on Sunday night.

-

3. Kinky at Joe's Bar on Friday night.

-

4. Kelroy at Joe's Bar on Friday night.

-

5. Slavic Soul Party at the Chicago Jazz Fest in Millennium Park on Friday night.

-

6. Carnage at North Coast on Saturday night.

-

7. Tipper at North Coast on Sunday night.

-

8. Whethan at North Coast on Saturday.

-

9. Deadmau5 and Eric Prydz at North Coast on Friday night.

-

10. Damian Marley at North Coast on Saturday night.

-

11. Sheila Jordan at Jazz Fest on Sunday night.

-

12. STS9 at the Concord for a North Coast aftershow on Sunday night.

-

13. Johnny Blas Afro Libre at Jazz Fest on Sunday night.

-

14. The Rooms Trio at Jazz Fest on Sunday night.

-

15. Jenna Przybysz at Jazz Fest on Sunday night.

-

16. The Jonathan Doyle Swingtest with Joel Paterson at Jazz Fest on Sunday.

-

17. Infrared at Jazz Fest on Sunday.

-

18. Lonnie Smith at Jazz Fest on Friday night.

-

19. Jason Moran at Jazz Fest on Friday night.

-

20. Tim Fitzgerald at Jazz Fest on Friday.

-

21. The David Forman Project at Uncommon Ground on Sunday night.

-

22. Kevin Morby at Lincoln Hall on Friday night.

-

23. John Mayer in Tinley Park on Saturday night.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:41 PM | Permalink

September 1, 2017

The Week In Chicago Rock

You shoulda been there.

1. Kelly Hogan and Casey McDonough at City Winery on Wednesday night.


-

2. APED at Quenchers on Thursday night.

-

3. Shelby Lynne and Allison Moorer at City Winery on Wednesday night.

-

4. Olivia Newton-John at the Rialto in Joliet on Sunday night.

-

5. Depeche Mode in Tinley Park on Wednesday night.

-

Catching up with . . .

Green Day at Wrigley Field on August 24.

-

Lady Gaga at Wrigley Field on August 25.

-

Catfish and the Bottlemen at Wrigley Field on August 24.

-

The Zac Brown Band at Wrigley Field on August 26.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:32 PM | Permalink

The Beachwood Radio Sports Hour #167: Bears 'A Clusterbomb Of Ridiculousness'

The Bears are who we told you they were. Plus: 'The Cubs Are Ready To Go'; Concussion Report; Rick Hahn's Best Season; and The Fire Go Up In Smoke.


-

SHOW NOTES

* 167.

:15: The Bears Are Who We Told You They Were.

*

*

Bernstein: What Was John Fox Thinking?

*

*

*

-

31:30: 'The Cubs Are Ready To Go.'

*

Bernstein: This Cub Is Killing It.

46:15: Highland Park Park District Cancels Tackle Football.

* See also: Tackle Rings?

48:43: Rick Hahn's Best Season.

* Every last crumb.

49:41: Schweinsteiger!

* The dream is over.

-

For archives and other shows, see The Beachwood Radio Network.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 1:02 PM | Permalink

If Corporations Paid Their Fair Share . . .

A progressive think tank was joined by hundreds of supporters Thursday in a Twitter campaign demanding that corporations pay a fair tax rate.

A day after President Donald Trump touted his "scam" tax proposal, the Institute for Policy Studies' #PayUpCorps campaign highlighted needs in infrastructure, healthcare and other sectors that could be paid for with all the money corporations stand to save under the Koch brothers'-backed tax plan.

Trump and Republican leaders in Congress hope to cut the corporate tax rate from an already low 35 percent to 20 percent - though the Institute on Tax and Economic Policy has found that many Fortune 500 companies effectively already pay only about 20 percent of their profits in taxes, and, contrary to Republican promises, the savings don't lead to job creation.

Supporters of #PayUpCorps, including Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), shared their thoughts on how that money could be better spent, and debunked Trump's claim that corporate tax cuts will create jobs.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 10:15 AM | Permalink

Beachwood Photo Booth: Lannings' Crossing

A Grand Rapids intersection.

jennings.jpg(ENLARGE FOR PROPER VIEWING)

-

More Chicago photography from Helene Smith.

-

Helene on Twitter!

-

Meet Helene!

-

Stationery, iPhone cases, hoodies.

-

Listen to Helene talk about Photo Booth; starts at 57:54.

-

Previously:
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Man Grilling
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Yum Yum Donuts
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Father's Day
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vintage Airmaster
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Time
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Shade
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Illinois Slayer
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Fire Escape
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Nugget
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hollywood, Chicago
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flag Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Van In Flames.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fluid Power Automation.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Corn Dog.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop The Killing Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Backyard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A to Z Things.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Swedish Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Rothschild Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Silos.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Wires.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Orange Garden.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Irving Park Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Pigeons.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Lanagan's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: For Rent.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Pizza & Liquors.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mori Milk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Breakfast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Chicago Christmas Postcard.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Harold's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Family Fun.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snow Bike.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nativity Scene.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Warsaw.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deluxe Cleaners.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Marie's Golden Cue.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Die Another Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sears Key Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jeri's Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Barry's Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Liberty.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Kitchen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Golden Specials.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Won The Cup.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartender Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Plane Blues.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Finest Quality.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Family Guy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Girls Wanted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skokie Savanna.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Signpost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Man And The Tree.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Street Fleet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Citgo Story.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fantasy Hair Design.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Garage.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Clark Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pole Position.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Window Dressing.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Geometry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Found Love.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Fill In The Blank.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Vacuums Of The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dumpster Still Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wagon Master.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Intersecting West Rogers Park.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Antiques.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cow Patrol.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Backstage Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skully Bungalow.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Francisco Frankenstein.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Long Cool Heat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Smokers' Mast.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Big Fat Phone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Happy Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alley Men.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Show!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You've Got Mailbox.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Broken Window Theory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Dali Logan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Svengoolie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Horner Park Hot Dogs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cubs Rehab.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 20th Century Schizoid Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Men On Vans.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Penn-Dutchman Is Done.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Snowy Lincoln.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Waiting Room.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Avondale Chicken.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Winter's End.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Friendly Skies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boyhood Buzzer Beater.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: J Date.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: International Window Lady.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shanghai Inn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Open For Business.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Andersonville Unplugged.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: 3-Flat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Turkey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicagolandia.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Eat At Odge's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Deitch Pharmacy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sud-Z Bubble.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bands Wanted!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Belmont Tavern.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Superheroic San Luis Freeze.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Evanston Oasis.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lyndale Food & Jewelry.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Book Window.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Alco Dude.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ballin Drugs.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Worry, Be Cookie.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Four Trey.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Office.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America From Inside The Golden Nugget In Ravenswood.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cellphone Repair.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Boots 'N' Grill.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunrise Strip.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: At The Corner Of Glad And Happy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Uptown Autumn Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Diner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mid-Century Modern Halloween.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Autumn Station Wagon.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Betty's & Nick's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ohio House Impact.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: End School Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Portage Park Peek-A-Boo.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: South Side Sundown.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Susie's Drive-Thru.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Holiday Ham.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Food & Liquor, Milhouse.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: O'Hare Blue Line Man.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Schwing!
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ad Deluxe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Jesus At The Drive-In.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Tanks Of Avondale.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Conveyance Belt.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonk.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Esquire In The Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Nick's Meat Market.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Keep Havin A Good Day.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Knock Knock.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Man At Marie's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bonneville.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Logan Bags.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Stairwell.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Blue Velvet.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Court Is In Session.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: DLER ALKY.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Railyards Rush Hour.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stop Killing People.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 1.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Greystone Chicago.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: You Are Beautiful.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Auto Part Overlords.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bearground.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 2.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Skyway Sculpture.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Dome Car.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Hello, St. Joe.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Revolution Books.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Driveway.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Proceed To Checkout.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Summer Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Daily Double.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Are Moving.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: America, Summer 2016, Part 3.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sunny Day Tap.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Ashland & Pawn.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Party Store.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Donuts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: AAA Sales.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Rule.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Butcher Boy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Endorsement.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Ghost.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: I Voted.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Pink(ish) Cadillac.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Stuffed With Sadness.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Air.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Economy Heating.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Season's Greetings.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: American Housemates.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: We Have Fresh Goat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bartcam.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gaslight.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Urban Wheat.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Embassy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Lincoln's Cozy Corner.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Old Glory.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bowling Night.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Red Lion, Red Hots.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: House Sitting.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: A Jukebox Is Not A Democracy.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Descending Darkly.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Handicapped Milk Jug Zone.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gumball Express.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicken Run.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wyoming, Michigan.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Bus Stop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Manzana.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Don't Look Back.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Mail Call.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Gas Pump No. 8.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Photo Shoot.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Flotos' Gifts.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Shelf Life.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: S&M Carpets.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Elvis At The Golden Nugget.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Wunder's.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Chicago Daisies.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Supply Line.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Sal's Barber Shop.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: The Classy Oogle Queen.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cloudy Gate.
* Beachwood Photo Booth: Cherry Pie.

-

Comments welcome.

Posted by Beachwood Reporter at 9:41 AM | Permalink

MUSIC - Song Of The Moment: Alabama.
TV - Media Consolidation To Get Even Worse.
POLITICS - Offshore Leaks Database.
SPORTS - Beachwood Radio: Broken Bears; Cubs' 7-Year Itch.

BOOKS - Inside The Book Of The Dead.

PEOPLE PLACES & THINGS - Lakes, Cheese & You.


Search The Beachwood Reporter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter
Email:

Follow BeachwoodReport on Twitter



Beachwood Radio!


Ask Me Anything!